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Three questions:
>When was the last time any government did something that made it easier for the farmer to run his/her business?
>Will every other country around the world be implementing the same measures that are a direct cost to farmers?
>Is there a problem with seed companies going broke lately?

You can probably gauge my level of support from those questions...
 

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They are taking cues from Apple and Deere; license to use and the consumer never actually owns the product. It would be nice if they had more than one consultation per province so the grassroots opposition could be better quantified.

Edit: Just spoke to my local Sask Wheat commission director(who posts on here) who said it is best to contact AAFC to voice concerns. I will update this post with that when I get it. It sounds like this change is being rushed through with minimal consultation. The meeting in Saskatoon is only a 50 seat room. Greatly deficient when this will fundamentally change how the industry is structured.
 

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I thought Europe or England already had this. I can not imagine Monsanto letting you keep seed back and paying a royalty .Too much money on the table
 

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Another Gift From Gerry Ritz (the Ritz Cracker)

He’s the gift that keeps on Giving- should’ve been Tar and Feathered and drug around town
 

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Im not a farmer but have been involved in ag all my adult life so bear that isn mind. Here are my thoughts. I think it's BS. However, IF they are going to implement this, then it should come with the condition that NO existing varieties are EVER deregistered. This way, any varieties that require the royalty paid would have to have ACTUAL financial benefit to the producer or they just won't seed it and stick with the older, non-royalty varieties. They would have to actually EARN the royalty, not just extort it out of the producers. This would put an end to the perpetual "X% better than the check (Y variety) that we all know is BS in most cases. If these new varieties that have been coming out over the last 20 years REALLY performed better than the check by the claimed yield, we would be averaging over 100 BPA by now.
 

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Yes just one more step towards us being their servants. Getting very close to not actually ever owning anything we have or use, such as technology, the grain we grow, and the banks pretty much own the rest. It's getting sickening, I'm almost on the verge of telling the whole world to go F*#K itself and leave me alone.
 

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Anybody know the dates? I'm 50 and have had enough of this as well. Every time I turn around someone else wants a piece of my pie. There isn't any left. I have said that if Turdo gets in again we are finding somewhere else to live. Hard to do as there isn't many places where we can go that our dollar is par. I just hope people are smarter this time but I have a feeling the majority east haven't figured it out.
 

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Oh this is finally starting to rear its head. Wondered how long it would take.

It's a revolving door between government and big ag. We are really behind the 8 ball here.

A couple of us went to the CSTA meeting in Calgary last December because we heard of this in the pipeline. Among the discussions were meetings thinking up ways to get more money out of the "value chain"(that's how you are viewed boys), under the guise of having more money for breeding programs and variety research. Also how to manage farmer backlash. The heads of the farmer groups (such as Alberta wheat) were there rubbing shoulders with monsanto/syngenta/richardson-pioneer/etc and giving advice on how to structure things.

Farmers are going to need to be vocal on this one, this is a pure cash grab. And we need to push back on upov-91. Their ultimate goal is hard end point royalties and no farm saved seed.
 

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The meeting in Saskatoon is in a venue that only holds 50 people, half of which will be commission directors, a lot of the other half will probably be apas, so there will be next to no room for producers. Seems like a sham process to push through what they want.
 

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The meeting in Saskatoon is in a venue that only holds 50 people, half of which will be commission directors, a lot of the other half will probably be apas, so there will be next to no room for producers. Seems like a sham process to push through what they want.
Somehow I feel like they won't have the wine+cheese, tapas, or open bar at the farmer meetings like they had at the industry ones.
 

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This is coming from the UPOV 91 agreements, and it does already happen in other countries. Canada is finally catching up to the rest of the world, good or bad. This agreement allows for the breeders to collect royalties on their seeds for X numbers of years to put that money back into research, but it also allows for changes in new varieties coming to the market. For example, if a variety has been tested in one country and has passed all the minimum check standards, that data can be transferred any where in the world, just have to match data to each countries check standards. This would allow foreign varieties that are better than domestic varieties to be allowed in months time rather than years time doing testing as if it was a brand new unregistered variety.
Unfortunately this is a broad brush approach to things, as this agreement covers all breeding of plants, from wheat to pineapples, and there is really not any separation between annual crops and perennials.
Canada has always been a part of this agreement, but we were operating on a previous agreement (UPOV 78 I believe). In 2015 it was agreed to enter into the UPOV 91 agreement, but I am not sure how much that has been enforced, and I do remember that there is a new convention coming soon to again relook at this agreement.
For some industries this will be a big advantage in breeding, newer strains will be coming into production much sooner with a worldwide breeding program. Unfortunately for things like the "usual" cash crops, wheat, barley, oats, etc. they are very location specific. Even varieties that are bred in Manitoba will not work so well in Alberta, and vise versa, so bringing in a variety from Australia really wont help at all. But under the new agreement, just by comparing data, if the variety will work, it will be much easier to bring the variety over to Canada to see if it will out perform what is already established.

https://www.upov.int/portal/index.html.en
 
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