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Discussion Starter #41
on the 45ft bifold door or wider anyone have any problems on a post frame building with durability or movement. Also what do people do when opening the large bifolds, I know when smaller bifolds 30 and 35ft doors open it creates a vaccum in the building for a second or two and any doors that are open will slam shut, just curious if this can cause any problems with structure or not. Anyone have a good reason not to have one door at 45ft wide?
 

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on the 45ft bifold door or wider anyone have any problems on a post frame building with durability or movement. Also what do people do when opening the large bifolds, I know when smaller bifolds 30 and 35ft doors open it creates a vaccum in the building for a second or two and any doors that are open will slam shut, just curious if this can cause any problems with structure or not. Anyone have a good reason not to have one door at 45ft wide?
We have a 50’ on an 80’ wide building. Laminated posts next to the door and on the corners with 3/4” plywood on end walls. We open it daily and haven’t had any problems with it in 3 years. Absolutely love being able to run the combines in with headers on at night.
 

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I have been doing a fair amount of reading of opinions on doors, and seems to be a common theme that the bifold doors seal a fair bit better than overheads, and even more so when you factor in the removable post. Given that doors are closed the vast majority of the time, I am wondering if it is not better to just get a large bifold for the big stuff and a 20 or 24ft wide overhead for day to day use and then I dont need to worry about if there is any movement in the header or concrete where the center post attaches, also the price difference to go from a 35 to 45ft bifold is not all that great in the scheme of things so maybe that is a better way to go? comments
I would recommend the 45ft bifold. We have a 40’ and love it. 35’ header stays on combine. It is insulated better than the overhead door at the other end. Easy to add big windows on for light. Can put a man door in it if you need it.
 

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Depending on width of building but don't think you'd have to0 much trouble getting a 45' header through a 40' door.
 

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Discussion Starter #46
Thoughts, I can go to a 22' high building or go with a 20' high building but add 10' to the length of the building for roughly the same cost. This is for a heated farm shop, The extra space would be nice, but at the same time I think you loose about 2' of height no matter which height of building you goto. i.e. by the time you put in fans, overhead doors, etc, the effective height becomes 18'. Probably dont need more than that, but what are your thoughts on the extra height versus the extra length?
 

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We have a 18’ tall shop with 16’ doors. Newer Deere combines with folding top go through door, can open lid but just barely. Saying that, They shouldn’t get taller !
I know there are budgets, but i would consider taller and wider maybe ? 100’ is nice for super B.
 

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We built a heated aircraft hangar 80’x80’ with a 60’ hydraulic swing up door. It was a tough decision between bi-fold or single swing. We’re glad we went single swing because it seals up tight and turns into a wall. No whistles or rattles on windy days. The manufacturer of the door says 20knot max winds when opening, and we agree with that. It looks like a gust would rip it off even though it’s built stout.
 

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on the 45ft bifold door or wider anyone have any problems on a post frame building with durability or movement.
These doors can be built to basically be their own free standing structure. We poured a dedicated, concrete slab with piers for the door. And I beams for the frame. So it really doesn't rely on the zipper lock building for any support.
 

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Whatever you think you need...add ten feet. My dad has put up two different shops and outgrew both of them very quickly, especially when it came to door width, because of poor planning. Now we fight it with both because machinery has just kept getting wider and we're to the point some stuff just stays outside when we work on it. This last shop he put up is damn nice and now we can't get some things in it. Kind of defeats the purpose of having a shop some days.
 

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Heres a pic of the removable post door, 44’10” with post moved. 20’ tall. Shop is 65 by 120 w 22’ high interior. Lose about a foot to 18” with lights/fans and door tracks. Allows full super bees to park w 25-30’ behind them and lots of room to work. Original plan was 75’ wide but couldn’t budget it in. I think I’ll regret not building that 10 extra feet within 10 years! Make sure shop is long/wide enough to park your biggest equipment you want to work on in the winter. Hope this helps.
 
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