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For the guys who have already built a shop, pros/cons of building type. I'm looking at putting up a larger shop as well next spring/summer and have been getting quotes on steel, stick frame and post buildings (using the concrete post in the ground). Prefab concrete I'm guessing will break the bank, sounds like steel will cost the most, followed by stick frame with a 4' pony wall around the outside. The post structure sounds cheapest and quickest, the wood never touches the ground and can be up in a few weeks if all goes well. My neighbor built a 60x100x24 using steel frame with wood frame in between with a 3' footing wall around the outside, very well built but it actually creaks in the wind and you can see where the steel girders are behind the tin as that is where the dust clings too (static?) Leaning towards the post style due to price and they are a fairly local company. TIA
 

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For the guys who have already built a shop, pros/cons of building type. I'm looking at putting up a larger shop as well next spring/summer and have been getting quotes on steel, stick frame and post buildings (using the concrete post in the ground). Prefab concrete I'm guessing will break the bank, sounds like steel will cost the most, followed by stick frame with a 4' pony wall around the outside. The post structure sounds cheapest and quickest, the wood never touches the ground and can be up in a few weeks if all goes well. My neighbor built a 60x100x24 using steel frame with wood frame in between with a 3' footing wall around the outside, very well built but it actually creaks in the wind and you can see where the steel girders are behind the tin as that is where the dust clings too (static?) Leaning towards the post style due to price and they are a fairly local company. TIA
I think you might be surprised in the steel price. Talk to Alex at Svenska builders.
 

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I can confirm this is the case. Prairie Steel is a little more than wood, but not by that much. The guys over there are very helpful and can engineer to whatever you need. All the pieces come with holes drilled and ready to bolt together. We will hire some guys to help out but we plant to do a lot of the work ourselves, using a large telehandler and a scissor lift.
 

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Meskie we have used ICF for our grade beam. I am not sure exactly what you are refering to with a pony wall but it worked well for the grade beam giving insulation on both sides of the cement and a easy way to form it. We put part of it in the ground and part of it out of the ground.
 

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All this talk about shops. Has anyone ever lengthened an insulated pole shed? Would like to make ours 10-15ft longer, plus add some sort of doors on that end.

Currently a blank wall, with no water, air, windows or doors, and only one 15 foot in wall wire feeding 1 plug.

Is it more hassle and expense than it's worth? It would allow fully attached Super B into ours. And then drive through. Thinking a 45ft bifold would be good there. Currently standing shelving there, but more shelves just means more junk.
 

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Haven't done that but it shouldn't be too hard, end wall isn't load bearing so it can be removed, add extra length, then rebuild end wall. Not sure how much it would cost, but definitely doable.
 

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Thanks, I will give prairie steel a call as well, I haven’t gotten a quote from where I originally went to price a steel shop as of yet, maybe it will be closer than I think!
 

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I have a Prairie Steel shop, no complaints. Built the footings with ICF since it is all in floor heat. You could do regular concrete forming and glue insulation on later, not sure how far you are ahead with one vs the other. The guy doing my concrete suggested the ICF route since he didn't have to waste a bunch of wood making forms. But he did pour a base to set the ICF blocks on to make everything level so likely ICF is more expensive. I didn't crunch the numbers and figured ICF would be better in the long run and would cut down my work and time later on in the project.
 

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We had a neighbor lengthen their shop. A little reinforcement of the gabble truss so you can leave it in place cut off center posts and add on. Probably put steel posts on new end wall to hang the door off
 

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drylandfarmer,

What do you think it costs to heat your shop for a year?
My shop accounts for roughly 40% of my total gas bill. House and shop are on same meter. So some pretty rough numbers here. Can't really say about electricity costs as there are too many variables so I'll just give you the natural gas heating costs.

I will use last years numbers as we had a very cold winter in 17/18.
Taking 40% of the natural gas consumption for the 6 month heating season I came up with 175GJ to heat the shop. Our current gas cost is $2.24/GJ plus $1.5 for cost of service for a total of $3.74 per GJ.

Thats a total heating cost of $654 for the winter heating season or about $109 per month.

This year's costs will be down a bit with a warmer winter.

I'm not including the stupid Alberta Carbon Levy of $1.517 per GJ or $265 for the winter as this is a BS tax that I'm confident will go away with a new spring government.:9:
 

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Our new shop is 80'x 200' x 20', it has a 50' x 20' tall bi fold door on the end and a 32' x 18 ' side door. It is will be getting a full heated floor and spay foam this spring... finished out with steel. My advice would be the same as others have said...build as big as you can afford. We are looking at building a 98' x 280' x 22' building for misc. equipment which hopefully is big enough. Also, over 100' wide really adds to the cost.
 

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Our new shop is 80'x 200' x 20', it has a 50' x 20' tall bi fold door on the end and a 32' x 18 ' side door. It is will be getting a full heated floor and spay foam this spring... finished out with steel. My advice would be the same as others have said...build as big as you can afford. We are looking at building a 98' x 280' x 22' building for misc. equipment which hopefully is big enough. Also, over 100' wide really adds to the cost.
Lottery dreams
 

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I'm not including the stupid Alberta Carbon Levy of $1.517 per GJ or $265 for the winter as this is a BS tax that I'm confident will go away with a new spring government.:9:
Aww, but doesn't it make you feel all warm and fuzzy know you are leaving the world a better place for Justin's children??!!
 
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