The Combine Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Had an inspection done on my 1640 by local dealer. They suggested changing feeder house chain sprockets. See images. Do they appear really worn? Only run a couple hundred acres a year.
162963

162964
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
They look OK to me, but I'd take them off, put them in an oil bath overnight, take them out and hang them to drain for 1hr or so and then re-install them. I'd do this every year before use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
847 Posts
Hardly see any wear. Combine had 600 hrs, reversed sprockets, went another 800 hrs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,965 Posts
Compared to my sprockets that I plan to run another season, they look great! Mine are at least 25% more narrow than yours. Took the final half link out of the feeder chain, so I know the chain is also going to need replacing. Will do it all at the same time this winter. Or maybe it's time to trade the combine off. So hard to know what to do these days. I'm sure if I got a full inspection done they could find $25k of stuff to do to the combine, which is cheaper than a new one of course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
You might want to check the rails along the side of the feeder house to see if the feeder chain is rubbing on them causing premature wear. If so, it could be an indication that the drive sprockets are worn and no longer providing the necessary clearance when the chain leaves the teeth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,585 Posts
They look decent to me. I will try find my last ones which were wore to spike with a tip or too missing. They can go a long time at 200 acres per year. The ones I changed lasted about 1000 hours as did the feeder chain. One thing I never do is tighten them very much! If they are really sagging and the top is touching the bottom when full of crop - they need adjusting. I probably keep 4 bars on bottom when empty.

When you realize the chain is being tightened by the crop running underneath, you really stretch your chain if you have a major MOG running through your combine. It is important to maintain some tightness because of the possibility of jumping a cog and going out of time. The only chain that needs to be running very tight is the ones that don't have steel bars attached to them to keep them from jumping out of time.

A really good investment for your combine is to buy the rubber roller modification which guides the upper feeder chain and keeps it from sagging. Maybe you have it already?
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top