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I’m looking at replacing both feeder chains on an R76. The front lasted about four seasons, but back only lasted about one and is already wore completely out and sprockets are shot. The reason for that is it had a lot of 15bu wheat ran through it. Is pfp plastic slat chain the best bet for a lighter chain? Or I was thinking just get the strands of chain and not putting as many old slats back on? Mainly cut wheat/milo will the plastic slat hold up? Thoughts on the pfp split sprockets? TIA
 

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Honestly I don't think the plastic slats will be agressive enough to feed very well. There is a new chain that is in the 9 series, I put them in this year in a r66 and never adjusted them all year. I would give them a try. No opinion on the split sprockets, I know pulling that top shaft is a pain in the arss
 

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Honestly I don't think the plastic slats will be agressive enough to feed very well. There is a new chain that is in the 9 series, I put them in this year in a r66 and never adjusted them all year. I would give them a try. No opinion on the split sprockets, I know pulling that top shaft is a pain in the arss
Honestly I don't think the plastic slats will be agressive enough to feed very well. There is a new chain that is in the 9 series, I put them in this year in a r66 and never adjusted them all year. I would give them a try. No opinion on the split sprockets, I know pulling that top shaft is a pain in the arss
whats different about the the new chain
 

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whats different about the the new chain
Something to do with the pins, I believe they are welded to the links and previously was riveted. Slat spacing is also somewhat different, fewer slats so more capacity and lighter. The rear of the 6 series is a link or 2 longer than the 9 series due to the lowered rear shaft so you will need 1 or 2 more sets of 1/2 links
 

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I’ve had the PFP poly slat chains in for 5 or 6 seasons and are showing minimal wear. I’ve had no feeding issues, and they are super quiet. I’ll never run a different chain again.
 

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I’m looking at replacing both feeder chains on an R76. The front lasted about four seasons, but back only lasted about one and is already wore completely out and sprockets are shot. The reason for that is it had a lot of 15bu wheat ran through it. Is pfp plastic slat chain the best bet for a lighter chain? Or I was thinking just get the strands of chain and not putting as many old slats back on? Mainly cut wheat/milo will the plastic slat hold up? Thoughts on the pfp split sprockets? TIA
we use the nylon in and R75, R72. No difference on feeding am aware of - and its eaten 23% wheat and 20% canola. We use stripper header, straight cut and pickup. Once using a nylon chain, you will never use a steel one again in your life. Quiet and light.
 

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It may work for some when conditions ideal. I will never use again. JMO. See the thread:
Gibson feeder chains??
Here were some of my and others initial thoughts on plastic feeder chains:
Plastic Feeder Chain

Some people love them, others hate them! I am one of the latter lol! I did want to see if a metal slat with plastic on it (Harvest Services) would have been better than a fibreglass embedded one (Gibson). I only had the latter. Last feeder chain was OEM steel in a CR8090 and it lasted 1000 hours, but the sprockets were finished and starting to shed teeth. I don't believe in keeping a tight feeder chain in a NH DSP Machine (non-acoustic rock trap) as I figure the material passing under it is the chain tightener. If there is no material (which should be rare) ie. turning around in a field, there will be for a short time metal to metal contact - oh well! For me, I keep a chain tighten enough that it is not noisy under normal conditions. Too loose a chain and you may get top and bottom slats slapping each other when heavy feeding and of course that would not be good!
 
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