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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Went on a drive yesterday and saw this 970 and 960. The 970 got traded in on a 9070.

Take care,

Nathan



 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That be it. Same one on the cover of the Ontario Farmer last fall.

Take care,

Nathan
 

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I saw this one today also. It was parked beside a tx 68 out
back of the shop. Seemed to be a lot less pulleys and chains
all over like our tx. Was a little surprised at how narrow
the feeder housing intake was. Made me wonder how they
get all that material up through that little hole. Another thing
I wondered about. Seems like a rotary would need more
hp to do the same thing as a walker, just my guess
looking at what it has to do to spin all that straw around
inside from front to back especially if it has hydraulic driven
rotors. This machine looked like belt drive which should be
much better by not waisting so much power pumping oil.
Would this be able to keep up with a tx68 in the field
being probably 10 or 15 years newer technology. They
both have about the same hp although I never get near
max hp when running. They must have an advantage
because I have never seen a cx model around here.
Just picked up the last few parts to finish up a fairly major
overhaul.


Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've always wondered. We use rotarys and the Europeans use conventionals and their wheat yields alot more. Like 50bu more. rotarys are better but I don't think there as good as we think. I've never ran a big conventional only a 9400 Deere. The TR88 and CR940 rotarys are nice. Rotarys do take more HP i'm convinced. When our CR940 broke down they gave us a TR99 with an 8r to run. That TR99 pushed that 8r better then that CR did with a 6r. Direct drive compared to going through clutchs on its way to the rotors.

Take care,

Nathan
 

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Rotaries excel in fall crops by nature. If you were only going to harvest high yielding small grains then a convential might suit better, but here in the States we want to roll on in fall crops. Rotaries may require more power to the rotor but you get multiple passes around the rotor to thresh the grain compared to one chance with a cylinder, not to mention more moving parts with the straw walkers etc.
 

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This is exactly the bit I am trying to get figured out. If a machine works better in really heavy crops,
why would it not work even better in our wimpy light north american crops. I never had a rotary
but it looks like that is all that will be available when it is time to trade this one in in a few years.
The part about rolling on fall crops hydro100 spoke about. Does that mean that these newer rotaries
can run in tough conditions better than the conventionals or did you mean that they can move through the late season type crops faster.
thanks for your patients guys.
 

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Over here (Scotland) there was a misconception that rotaries couldn't handle damp and green strawed crops. However the new generation seem to be better thann walkers now in all conditions. I run a Claas 460 (6 straw walkers and 330hp) and a 570 (narrow bodied rotary, 425hp). The 570 outperforms in most conditions, the only place where there is nothing between them is in canola when we are direct cutting it, needs a lot of hp to chop it and the rotary is already using them or separation. BUT the rotary is still putting a lot less over the back.
 

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tx68, what I was trying to say was that a rotary will do a better job threshing in tough conditions like green stem beans. In corn they have more capacity to handle the corn crop we grow in the U.S. Hydro
 

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It's important to remember that where a rotary like the Axial Flow or the NH threshes and separates using the rotor, the Lexion rotors only separate; threshing is done up ahead. Just a thought.
 
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