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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering what the life is of the updated chopper bearings. Has anybody here had them fail? We have 3 8240's with 1200 sep hours that have the updated bearings and have not have any problems yet. We've been greasing them at least every 80 to 100 hours. Debating if we should change them before they cause problems. I believe a kit with all 3 bearings runs around 500 from our local dealer.
 

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Boy I hear you on the straw chopper bearings, I’ve heard the same thing as you say, I have 7120 and grease the bearings every day with no problems so far at 2400 separator hours but worry they will go soon! I’ve heard they are the weak spot! But for you if you want peace of mind change them otherwise who knows how long they will last?
 

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A couple of people mentioned using high quality jobber bearings instead of the ones Case sells. Possibly with normal locks instead of the weird ones these bearings use.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Druggles, do you have a standard chopper, or a mega cut? Seems like people have more problems with the choppers other than the standard ones.
 

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If you do need to change the bearings, it's not a horrible job. The first time it will take 4 or 5 hours and requires removing the hydraulic filters. Will be faster the second time around. Yes I've had to do it more than once over the years, but on two occasions it wasn't the bearing that had failed but the teeth on the clutch assembly sheared off, and the procedure is about the same for that job and changing the bearing.

In your greasing, don't forget to grease both bearings on the right-hand side of the chopper. A lot of people forget to grease the inner bearing there. On the left hand side of the chopper the inner bearing is not greaseable, and runs very hot in my experience. I'm not sure if grease is a help or a hinderence to bearings in general.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Torriem. I have heard of the teeth of the clutch assembly shearing off. In fact, I know off a guy it happened to twice in 3 years, but he thinks it was operator error. Could a guy just take it off and check the teeth on the clutch? The one thing I really dont understand, how the locking collar on the bearing works. The book calls for a special tool. Do you have to have the special tool for that, or can you get by without it. Yes I am aware of the inner bearing on the right side. As far as it greasing helps or hinders, that could be discussed all day and night.
 

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I believe that my teeth sheered off because the locking collar on the main bearing slipped and the entire chopper shifted slightly, opening up a gap between the clutch plate and the small pulley. Or possibly the pulley itself shifted, since it's locked with the same sort of locking collar which can come loose if it's not set properly. Over time the teeth just wore with less contact area until they sheered off. Ever since then part of our shutdown procedure is to take a look at the pulleys and make sure there's no big gap opening up between the clutch plate teeth and the pulley teeth. If the small pulley with the teeth ever does walk on the shaft, I believe you can loosen off the collar and slide it out and re-tighten it (as described below). Definite something to check for a while after you change the bearings in case it doesn't stay tight.

The locking collar is a bit gimicky in my opinion. Basically you slide it inside the bearing so it's between the shaft and the bearing. The lock itself is two layers, which interlock such that when the inside is pushed against from the outside portion, it acts like a wedge, wedging itself tightly between the bearing inner surface and the shaft. Then with ordinary allen keys you screw all the set screws in around the outside ring which pushes the wedges against each other. To remove the collar, I just loosened all the set screws and then hit the ring with a hammer and punch. If you see a new collar you'll see why that works. There's two of these collars used, which face each other. One goes into the big chopper bearing and the other goes into the back side of the small pulley.

This locking collar bushing is about $200 CAD! crazy. Next time I lose a bearing, I definitely will try to replace that bearing and lock with a jobber bearing with a traditional lock collar. I think there's room for it.
 

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Just going off memory I believe I have 54 of the stationary knives on the drum. It seems like at the time it was called the fine cut chopper. I no it’s not the finest cut but at the time it was more than the standard cut.
 

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If you do need to change the bearings, it's not a horrible job. The first time it will take 4 or 5 hours and requires removing the hydraulic filters. Will be faster the second time around. Yes I've had to do it more than once over the years, but on two occasions it wasn't the bearing that had failed but the teeth on the clutch assembly sheared off, and the procedure is about the same for that job and changing the bearing.

In your greasing, don't forget to grease both bearings on the right-hand side of the chopper. A lot of people forget to grease the inner bearing there. On the left hand side of the chopper the inner bearing is not greaseable, and runs very hot in my experience. I'm not sure if grease is a help or a hinderence to bearings in general.
You don’t have to remove the filter to do the bearings on the left side.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Torriem, Can the locking collar be reused? sounds like the bearing kit comes with just the 3 big greaseable bearings. 900 something dollars. Ouch.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
All right I kinda thought that. I think what we've decided to run them one more season, but we'll try to get all the parts and stuff to replace them if they go out. I checked the gears on the clutch assembly on all 3 machines. One looked a little worn, nothing major. The gap between the clutches was the same on all 3 so everything is still tight it seems.
 
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