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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok putting plans together for our new shop. So what do you guys think about how to do the floor drain. Where to put them or forget them all together. Gonna have two 24ft overhead doors. One on end wall and one on sidewall. Should I put in one long one or two smaller ones?
 

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Put your drains close to your doors, like maybe 2 or 3 feet in. If you put your drains in the center of the floor when it rains the water runs from under the doors, if the seals aren't tight, and covers the whole floor making a wet, slippery mess. A company called, I think, U-drain makes a nice drain setup. I may be wrong with the name, but it is something like that.
Other hints, put floor heat in, you will never regret it. Oh, and make it larger than you had planned, it WILL be too small.
David.
 

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My thoughts are if you are putting in a floor drain so you can wash your pickup once a week in the winter... forget it and wash your pickup in town. If you are to put one in do it just in front of one door and only slope a small area of the floor to it so most of your shop floor is a level place to set up or level equipment.
 

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shop layout

put both of the doors in the same end of the building on the same wall if not they will act like a chimmney and cold air will blow thorough the building all the time. **** tough to heat with the draft all the time. overhead doors are the worst. other option is to make one door bifold so you can seal it tight when not being used.
 

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Make sure you have a dirt/debris trap in your drain system. Letting any dirt into your sewer pipes will eventually build them up to the point of being blocked. A good way to make a floor drain is to start by making a square out of 2x2x1/4 angle iron to hold the grate. You need a pit formed in the cement below this at least 18 inches deep. The drain pipe should enter the side of the pit near the top with a coupler at the end of it. Then you push a street elbow into the coupler pointing down and do not glue it. This allows for water to run into the pit letting any solids settle to the bottom and water is siphoned up into the street elbow and into the drain pipe. Solids will not siphon and the street elbow can be removed when it's time to clean out the solids. The street elbow also acts as a gas trap and prevents any sewer gas from coming in through the drain. For pipe, 4" sewer pipe is probably the best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
put both of the doors in the same end of the building on the same wall if not they will act like a chimmney and cold air will blow thorough the building all the time. **** tough to heat with the draft all the time. overhead doors are the worst. other option is to make one door bifold so you can seal it tight when not being used.
Overheads seal better then a bifold.. Dont they?
 

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Overheads seal better then a bifold.. Dont they?
The good overhead ones seal fine if installed correctly. Worked in a large six bay shop for years with doors at each end of the bays, once the old wood ones got replaced with the metal ones, there was no drafts to speak of.

You want a door of somekind at the opposite end if you're only putting in one big one. You need it so you can pull something in and be able to get back out and if you need access to the opposite side if you have something large in the shop. Also if you run semis, nothing sweeter than being able to drive straight thru.

If you don't want a door in the back end wall, put a small one along a side wall in the rear, nice place to stick a loader tractor or pickup when the rest of the shop is being used.

Floor drains depend on how big you're building, if you put them right in front of the doors, they create hassles if you need to skid anything in or out. Mine is currently in the middle, wouldn't do that again, when the new shop goes up I'll put in two, one along each side about two feet in, you won't drive over them that way, they are out of the way, and the middle of your floor is dry and free of anything interfering with splitting stands or jacks, ect.
 

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We have a U Drain in our 50 x 60 shop. Placed right down the middle the opening is only an inch max can drive right over it with no issues also wont break an ankle stepping on it. Also very easy to install. I am very happy with it.
 

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First rule when building a shop, if you think it is big enough, make it half again as big and it still won't be big enough but it will be closer. At our farm shop we have a poly drain floor drain in front of our door and it works very well. I have one in the middle of the floor in my garage and it works fine as well, personal preference as far as that goes. PUT IN HOT WATER FLOOR HEAT, DON'T THINK TWICE ABOUT IT! We have overhead electric heat in ou main shop, 55 degrees at floor level, 75 in the bulk tank on the combine 15 feet off the floor. I have floor heat in my garage and it is the same temp at floor level as it is 15 feet off the floor in my office upstairs in my loft. Also make the door bigger than you think you need, you won't regret it.
 

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Floor drains depend on your operation.

Do you have snow and will you use the shop to thaw equipment?

If so, plaster the thing with drains and forget about the level floor. We tried keeping the back half of our shop level and the front half sloped to a drain the width of the shop. If I had to do it over I wouldve run at least another drain in the back, and kept a smaller portion of the floor level. Pushing water any more than 12-20' with a squeegee becomes a hassle. You dont want to be doing it. Plus its impossible to get the floor 100% perfectly level and you will always have spots where the water collects. So if you park your snow covered loader in the level part of the shop because the drained part is full, you may come back the next morning to find a nice lake underneath the combine you had ripped apart next to the loader on the level spot, with all of your tools, papers and parts also drenched.

You may say this will never happen to you, well it probably will happen from time to time.

If you build your own equipment more than you deal with snow, then build a level shop versus a drained shop.

How often do you want to wash the floor? This will also determine drains. If your working with dry dusty equipment, the broom will get most of it. but if working with manure equipment and such, its nice to be able to washdown, and again pushing water over 20' is not pleasant.

I would highly advise washing equipment outside. You can do the final wash and wax inside, but keep the heavy washing outside. It will eat the building up, and make an unpleasant work environment.

If you think your shops big, build it bigger than that. It still wont be big enough. If you think theres enough air outlets, electrical outlets and light bulbs, add at least 50% more. In our 60x 80 We spaced quad bank 110v outlets every 4-5'. We installed 37:4' 6 bulb T8 light fixtures which are actually a little bright at night when you walk in. But there are no shadows and you can work under vehicles without trouble lighting for basic service tasks.

Plan for reels of all types, air, electric, fluids, etc.

Designate an area for everything once you move in. The shop will stay cleaner if everything has a home and everybody knows where its home is. Im talking everything, from the welder down to a little wingnut. Have sections for things such as fasteners, plumbing, electrical, tools, fabrication. Also make everything as portable as possible. If you have to wire an entire trailer, you may waste 20 connectors and a bunch of wire because walking 60' across the shop everytime gets old. Whereas is you can wheel it over to you, you will be more inclined to use only what you need and put back what you dont. Same goes for tools. You can get a job done much quicker when your tools are right there, and if your box is right there you will more than likely put that tool away right away so the next time you need it for your project you are working on you will know right where to get it.

Put in an overhead hoist. We regret this everyday.

Maximize storage but dont go overboard. Filters, fluids and other spare parts belong in the shop. Large spare parts, or used spare parts or things you might find handy in the future (but know your just being a packrat) belong in another storage building if your farm is setup to do so. What Im saying is do not use the shop for storage. I like to have every inch of floorspace of the shop either occupied by a current project, workbench, or tools/supplies needed to complete repairs. Not occupied by random things that will not be used immediately.

Starting with the shop clean will help keep it neater. Dont let it get away from you clean it weekly at a minimum. cleaner neater environments allow for better repairs.

Put in enough doors and windows. They are expensive but allow yourself entry from two different sides of the shop for vehicles, so if the planter is blocking the front door/doors you can still pull the lawnmower or truck in the side door to work on it. We did a 24x16 and 14x14 in front and a 12x14 on the side with walkins on the side and front. Put in enough windows to taste. Depends on your preference. but during long winters its nice to have some natural light coming in. Helps as well if you have employees with seasonal depression which is common.

Car lift. If you do your own repairs even if its justy minor ones. Put in a car lift. You will get your use out of it, if nothing else the neighbors will once they hear you have one.

In floor heat. Again goes back to snow plowing. Bring all the snow covered stuff let it melt, back it out, squeegee the floor, couple minutes later its dry. Open the big door and stand 10' inside the shop and as long as it is calm you wont even notice its -10 outside.

Air conditioning. As i sit here on this 112* day, I think about how much wouldnt be getting done right now. Many people laugh at the idea of A/C in a shop and say "back in my day blah blah". You dont even need a full fledged A/C system. Ours is simply a very large heat exchanged with a squirrel cage fan. We run cold well water through it. It takes the humidity out and also cools down the air at the same time. Nothing like true A/C but when its 112* out with a relative humidty of 900%, it feels like a freezer in here.


Plan for the future. Make it big enough and open enough to accommodate what the future will bring because odds are you may never build another shop or it will be 20-30 years before you do. Our old shop was a converted corn crib, we did basic filter and fluid changes and a few minor repairs in it. I had more of an interest in the mechanic side and with the new shop we are now doing most of our own repairs from splitting tractors, to engines, and anything else we feel we can accomplish.

Remember confidence is the number one thing needed to accomplish a repair and the only difference between you and the mechanic at the dealer is he/she has maybe done it before.

Also having 3/4" plywood at the bottom 8' of the wall makes a good anchor point. Above the use acoustisteel if you are using steel lined walls. it costs more but your ears will thank you.

A shop will pay for itself. There are many things you have to do right the first time, so dont skimp on lights, outlets, drains, or size. Those things you can change down the road.
 

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durally I'm with you 110%, the best shops I have been in have been 100% shop with office bathroom parts and even some machining rooms off to the side leantoo. Only benches on wheels allowed, the only thing allowed in one place is the oil bar and some guys are making those portable too!
 

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Forgot the office, very important as well.

Cell phone repeater, must have.

WiFi, must have

Computer with printer and preferably high speed internet, must have. Everything is only these days.

Bathroom is a must have as well. And if you can swing it, put in a bubbler (drinking fountain for those outside of WI).

Fridge is also a must have.

Once you get moved in, start stocking parts. If you think you will need it, get it.

Im not saying stock everything, but things like belts, filters, windsheild wipers, and common wear parts should be on hand. If you know you will buy it by the end of the year put it on the shelf.

What I have found is service is more likely to get done if the parts are there. If you pull the tractor in to change the oil and it needs hydro filters too but you dont have them on the shelf, you arent going to just drive to the store to get them and if you do, your wasting money. So then you say youll get to it later, and we all know that never happens.

Most filters are changed annually at the most, our filter inventory totals $4,000-$5,000. Its a lot of money when you think about it, but invaluable. We use all Napa Gold for simplicity. The NAPA stuff is well priced, online ordering, very smart jobber for us, and delived 2-3 times weekly. It also makes inventory easy, and filters can be consolodated easily. Before we would have a Case version of an 8.3 Cummins oil filter, an Agco version, and a cummins version because nobody took the time to figure out that they were obviously the same.

Service books are handy too. I need to post mine up so others can copy them.
 

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radiant heat is a huge thing to have, yes it requires planning (where is the jib crane gonna be, where will any D rings be)

a upstairs above the bathroom/office area for storage is a must too.

plugs, plugs, and more plugs, make sure you have a welder plug on each wall.

cell repeater would be great, we are constantly running to the windows to answer phones, or leaving them outside with the door open

make your large door larger, we can fit the combine and corn head inside. in order to get the flex head in, we need to to back the combine in, drive the service truck and cart in, use the loader to do a 90* turn with the cart , the pickup the head with the combine to work on it, and the same for taking it out.

a back door is great for pulling the truck, or lawn mower out,

we have a small 6ft overhead for snowmobiles.

we have a rolling steel table, about 6x10, we didnt think we would use it, we roll it to each project and it keeps the tools and parts from being stacked on the equipment or the floor

we also placed bumpers near the large door openings, basically concrete filled 6in poles, rather hit them than the building or door tracks.

place a outlet outside, you may need to plug a tractor in overnight, and have no room to put it in shop
 

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I hate grated floor drains

I just put up a new shed to house / repair my heavy equipment and went with a drain called "U-Drain" basically to take advantage of the 1" channel slot that is the inlet and to avoid having to constantly repair the grates that would always pop out of the drains i have in my other shops. So far i've liked it, no plugging and excessive junk in the drain as well as anything bigger than an 1" doesn't fall though. Also as the drain itself is slopped I don't have a whole bunch of slopes on my floor. I went straight down the center of my shop which I probably should have done two lines a third in from each side, but thats on me....

i hope this helps.
 

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We have a U Drain in our 50 x 60 shop. Placed right down the middle the opening is only an inch max can drive right over it with no issues also wont break an ankle stepping on it. Also very easy to install. I am very happy with it.
Is that a good shop size for a 4500 acre grain farm? I was talking with a guy that just built a 60 x 80 and he feels its a bit large to heat all the time. I realize a large cold storage is needed too.
 

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we farm 6000ac and owere shop is by far the best investment. Its 75 by 200. 75-75 is heated and concrete the rest is dirt floor for parking stuff. We went geothermal heat and cool. Thats the only way to go. To heat in the winter and cool in summer has been $150 per month. Have 2 30ft by 18ft doors and one 20ft by 16ft. also have 30ft by 75ft leen to along one side for iron rack and aircompressor. built lofts inside and put office and parts upstairs and bathroom and tools under them. cooled it down to 79 this summer when it was 115 out:D. if your ever around st. john Ks and want to look at it give me a call 620-377-7099 cole mawhirter. Ya and its a blatner building, all iron frame
 
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