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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone been keeping a close track of how much fuel their machine is using. I know crop, conditions will have a big impact on how much or how little its uses.

It would be interesting to see just how a 740, 750, 760 or 780 compares.

I run a 2014 760, in cereals and peas it uses anywhere from 0.73 to 0.81 g/ac, running 40 ft maxflo draper.

Canola is higher, 0.88 to 0.95 g/ac. that is picking up a 25ft swath. :(


The fuel is metered going into the combine, which has been calibrated, and that is using a 4.5l g. I have found that there is around 0.08 diff. from a US g to imperial, when just using the combines fuel number.

So at 0.73g/ac , calculated, the combine is showing 0.81, that I believe is US g.:rolleyes:

As an avg on the total amount of fuel that is consumed for the harvest with different crops and all the conditions, it would be very close to 0.81g/ac imperial or 0.89g/ac US.

How does this compare to other machines?
 

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.81 imperial g/ac is equal to .97 US g/ac. My guess is that you are not able to run your combine anywhere near capacity on a 25 ft swath? Unless yields are similar, bushels per gal is a more appropriate way of comparing fuel consumption.
 

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We never monitored our fuel usage close enough to give an accurate value but in a good wheat crop (90 bu/ac) they used approximately 1 - 1.25 imperial gal/acre. (Based on slip tanks/day) Thinking about this a little more I would say we used closer to the 1.25 imperial gallons per acre. I like the idea of stating the fuel consumption as 15.8 bu/liter (wheat) instead of 1.25 imperial gallons per acre.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
4x4 , did u get the printer on your new combines?
That is nice , on your daily counter if u follow it , hit the print button and 30 seconds later u got every number for the day , or field.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Picking up for speed depends on just how green some of the bottoms swaths are. The seeds are all turned but stocks are alittle green .
I've picked up 50bu swath at speeds up to 7 mph. .. That gives a guy perma grin lol.
2013 crop went threw a lot easier than last yr. At peak times hit 1600 bu/hr in heavy spots , realistic avg was 1300. This last yr with the mud under swath , I couldn't get those high numbers and wasn't risking plugging it, so peak was around 1350 , and avg would be around 1100. I could've maybe got a steady 1200 put it was going through in places very hard, which increased the fuel.
 

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We find fuel use is really dependent on conditions. Early season green straw and wet field conditions a couple years ago was horrendous on fuel consumption. Late season hard ground seems like you can get through a day and half the tank is still there. So it's really not a number we try to micro manage.
 

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4x4 , did u get the printer on your new combines?
That is nice , on your daily counter if u follow it , hit the print button and 30 seconds later u got every number for the day , or field.
It was one of those options that if I knew what we were paying for it, I might not have got it but because it was on these two left over machines it was included. If we would have ordered 2015's instead of choosing the new leftover 2014's we would have paid a little more money, had 2015 models with singles instead of dual wheels; cloth instead of leather; no HP feeder house and no printer; we wanted Cemos Automatic either way. So anyway I guess some of these little bonuses such as the printer might come in handy.

7 mph is impressive. I wonder if there is a little higher shelling loss at that speed? Until I gain a little experience I am planning on limiting our speed to about 6 mph picking up. Once I know something plans may change but for now, in lighter crops, we may plan to straight cut with 40' headers.(although if the crop gets too light leaving it for straight cutting might put it at risk of shattering) In some years when the crop is heavy we might feel the need to swath to hasten ripening and in those years traveling 5.5 - 6 mph on a 29' cut should keep them running full.
 

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This promotional video by Claas shows a couple of 750's harvesting in Australia. They averaged .43 imperial gal/acre which sounds fantastic but it also works out to 19.1 bu/liter which doesn't sound so amazing. It was a very light crop.

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This promotional video by Claas shows a couple of 750's harvesting in Australia. They averaged .43 imperial gal/acre which sounds fantastic but it also works out to 19.1 bu/liter which doesn't sound so amazing. It was a very light crop.

Anvil Media | Claas Lexion promotional video - YouTube
Good post! They are moving. That is pretty efficient fuel use.

When talking about fuel , I learn so much more when its g/ac compared to bu/liter or bu/g. Cause .43 g/ac is outstanding and 19.1 bu/liter doesn't have the same effect, I must be a slow learner.lol

About time we talk about some good qualities, lately its been all doom and gloom! lol :D:D:D
 

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It's hard use this as a reference to mean much of anything. It all depends on what you are asking of the machine, such as chopper vs no chopper, fine cut vs not, how tight concave needs to be (ex. Harvesting glen wheat vs steel) different rasp bar configurations for dominant crops, back in the old days rock trap vs without, tire size and ground moisture, flat ground vs hilly, wieght of entire machine, operator, auto steer, list goes on and on. I think they all have engines capable of being pretty similar fuel consumption per horsepower so basing a combines fuel economy on wheatear to own it or not is generally useless in my opinion
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
It's hard use this as a reference to mean much of anything. It all depends on what you are asking of the machine, such as chopper vs no chopper, fine cut vs not, how tight concave needs to be (ex. Harvesting glen wheat vs steel) different rasp bar configurations for dominant crops, back in the old days rock trap vs without, tire size and ground moisture, flat ground vs hilly, wieght of entire machine, operator, auto steer, list goes on and on. I think they all have engines capable of being pretty similar fuel consumption per horsepower so basing a combines fuel economy on wheatear to own it or not is generally useless in my opinion
Hey SW, your whole post is useless. Why not just say u don't track your fuel. Honestly, saying hilly to flat, chopping to dropping straw , weight of machine, go reread the first post, it was not meant as a selling pitch to new customers, it was meant for operators that track their expenses, which I can tell u do not.

You got so many examples of this and that , well give me some. What is the difference of dropping to chopping, hilly to flat lmao! , or wheat to steel? u definitely know there is a huge difference , so what is it, I sure hope u didn't say all of that for your benefit and had no actual figures to back your opinion.
 

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Good post! They are moving. That is pretty efficient fuel use.

When talking about fuel , I learn so much more when its g/ac compared to bu/liter or bu/g. Cause .43 g/ac is outstanding and 19.1 bu/liter doesn't have the same effect, I must be a slow learner.lol

About time we talk about some good qualities, lately its been all doom and gloom! lol :D:D:D

Here's another video where the Lexion harvests 32 bu/liter (so fantastic fuel economy when comparing fuel used to the grain grain harvested) but assuming a yield of 4 tonnes/acre this would equate to 1.01 imperial gallons per acre.(so much poorer fuel economy per acre than in the Australia video)

 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Here's another video where the Lexion harvests 32 bu/liter (so fantastic fuel economy when comparing fuel used to the grain grain harvested) but assuming a yield of 4 tonnes/acre this would equate to 1.01 imperial gallons per acre.(so much poorer fuel economy per acre than in the Australia video)

!Official Video! Claas Night Shift- Nocna Zmiana 2011 [Polish version, SQ] - YouTube
Good video. The highest fuel I've ever seen on my machine was cutting 92 bu irrigated durum, it was flat as a pancake it laid over so bad, you could walk on it. Lifters scrapped the ground every inch to pick it up. Moisture was 19.5% and straw was tough even during the heat of the day cause it was always laying against the wet ground. Machine used 1.05 g/ac. It was a slow go , but still was going 3.2mph, I can remember when 3.2 was the best speed a guy got in the best conditions in heavy crop. It seems that when it gets slower than 4.5 mph, it feels like quitting, I guess a guy gets spoiled lol.

This summer didn't NH say they broke the record with their new 10.09?
 

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Hey SW, your whole post is useless. Why not just say u don't track your fuel. Honestly, saying hilly to flat, chopping to dropping straw , weight of machine, go reread the first post, it was not meant as a selling pitch to new customers, it was meant for operators that track their expenses, which I can tell u do not.

You got so many examples of this and that , well give me some. What is the difference of dropping to chopping, hilly to flat lmao! , or wheat to steel? u definitely know there is a huge difference , so what is it, I sure hope u didn't say all of that for your benefit and had no actual figures to back your opinion.
For youre info my standard rotor 1480's average between .8-1 gal per acre, my specialty rotor burns more at between 1-1.2, all have homemade choppers and kyle rotor flights among other things. I use this info to know if the modifications I make are benifiting me along with acres per hour and the whole shabang, the chopper system in combine with the specialty rotor takes more power than the one on the standard, can you see the difference?
 

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We have not beat our old 580's fuel record in corn yet. Emissions continue to choke out all brands. 169 acres of corn harvested on a measured 142 gallon of fuel. 35,900 bushels. Works out .84 gal./acre, 245 bushel harvested/gallon of fuel. 16 row head,good conditions. The claas corn record ,50,000 bu of corn harvested in a chronological 10 hr period was actually harvested in 9 separator hours. At 20 gal./of fuel seperator hr. thats 277 bu./gallon. As I remember Jeff was running a bit over 22 ac./hr. The lexions really do seem to be king in corn. I'm pretty sure we will hear more from claas in the on going wheat wars. I know these mines bigger than yours threads are pointless. Good luck! tiger
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
For youre info my standard rotor 1480's average between .8-1 gal per acre, my specialty rotor burns more at between 1-1.2, all have homemade choppers and kyle rotor flights among other things. I use this info to know if the modifications I make are benifiting me along with acres per hour and the whole shabang, the chopper system in combine with the specialty rotor takes more power than the one on the standard, can you see the difference?
Yep, that's what I was looking for.:D
 
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