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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey just have a few questions that have been eating away at me lately, I've only ran a conventional before this so I'm kind of new at this so bear with me haha

Just bought a 1660 with low low hours on it but noticed there's some sort of baffle type thing just behind the rotor, above the sieves is bent in the middle, what is this called an what does it do?

Also the combine came with new barley concaves, I'm curious what they are for? I'm guessing for malt barley?

Also I'm getting worried about one of the fields I'll be harvesting barley on, irrigated a little later than I should've and it laid down, there's a considerable amount of rocks on the one knoll and all I hear is how you don't want to run a rock through a rotary. my question is, is it really as bad as people make it out to be? I can say I've ran my fair share of rocks through a conventional and have been fine to this point knock on wood lol. The combine does have a rock trap but they seem to sneak by sometimes lol.

And suppose the rotor is off balance, how does one tell?

Also does anyone recommend bumping up the hp a little more?
 

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If it does not have a chopper, that "baffle" is just the beater pan and is a weak spot. You can try to straighten it. You can buy a new one and it will bend. And you can buy a new one, brace it, and it will still bend. Only way to not bend it, is to not run tough stuff into the machine that clumps up in the rotor and plugs the beater.

If the rotor is out of balance, it will shake the machine like crazy. Usually you can not see anything in the mirrors they will be shaking so bad.

I'll let others tell you about upping the hp as I do not do that. Both of my 1680s are stock hp and will remain so for some time yet. I dont have any rocks, so cant comment on it.
 

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Smaller rocks don't do much, maybe break a threshing bar or bend a vane. You can check your rotor balance by putting the gearbox in neutral and rolling the rotor by hand, if it stops and backs up you need to add some weight to the top side. I have no idea what barley concaves are.
 

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Okay thanks for the replies it helps me out quite a bit! Can you notice any difference in grain loss with that baffle being bent?
As MNfarmer85 mentions, any grain that makes it to that point is lost. So it does not effect that aspect.

What it does effect, is straw spreading abilities. With a new pan and put in the up position, the straw is sent higher on the sheet metal hood and then the straw is directed in a much more vertical aorientation onto the spreaders. This gives you the best and most even spread pattern.

If you run the pan in the low position or it is extremely bent, the straw will hit the hood lower and in general will then hit the spreaders at a more horizontal angle. That allows a larger portion of the straw to more or less slide over the spreaders and you will have a somewhat rowed effect behind the combine.
 

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I had a 1660 like yours for many years. I ran my share of rocks in it, but I don't think any ever reached the rotor. The rock trap in mine worked well. As for barley concaves, I'm sure that you're talking about the small wire concaves used in small grains. I had a set of these as well, and they worked ok, but I quit putting them on for small grains as my corn concaves did ok too. The difference would be unthreshed heads, and it seemed like if I played with the concave adjustment, rotor speed, and wind I could get those as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Okay thank you, I'll leave it out this year and see how it goes. I won't change that beater pan then because I plan on dropping all of the barley and wheat straw for baling. Has anyone dropped straw with these machines before and how did it work?
 

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I drop straw with my 1680 all the time. Works fine. Just pull the spreader disks and go.

At one time there was a preharvest check list that was made up from many members here and was quite a thorough list. If you can find it, it would be what you want to read. Maybe message the moderators if you cant find it searching.

Until you get some time on it to find what condition your machine is in, it is a crap shoot to guess from the keyboard. I usually run my machine in the farm yard at wot for a couple minutes and walk around it with eye goggles and ear plugs looking for any thing that might be out of order. Then shut it down and check all the bearings for any warmth.

I dont know about the 60s but there is a clean grain drive chain (the #50 chain) issue that rubs a hole in the sheet metal on the back side of the elevator on the 80s. Here's an old thread with pictures I put up some time back about that chain rub.
 

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I dont know about the 60s but there is a clean grain drive chain (the #50 chain) issue that rubs a hole in the sheet metal on the back side of the elevator on the 80s.
Yep, our 1460 has a gash in the sheet metal from that chain also, I'll have to look if our chain can rub on that anymore but the "leak fix" tape has held for the past couple of years. I think I found that hole the first year we used the combine. Use care when feeling around in that area, if you got a hole the edges are sharp!

I've had a couple small rocks go through ours a few years ago in beans and they bent a couple of the bars on the already worn out concaves but didn't put a dent in the rotor. I think the previous owner of the combine might have picked up something a bit larger though because it was upgraded to a specialty rotor and the concaves and grates were replaced about that time as well. Supposedly the rotor skin was thicker on the later ones but don't know when they started doing that. Our machine was built the year before the rock trap became standard and never had one put in so don't know how well the rock traps work.

Hopefully you were able to get the manual with the combine, otherwise see if you can get one from a CNH dealer. Find all the lube points and make sure all the zerks take grease, one of the main ones to make sure it takes is the one on the variable speed pulley on the rotor gearbox, (The driven pulley) not sure if its different on a 1660 but for a 1460 it needs to be greased every 10 hrs. and something like a max of 6 pumps. If not greased and that pulley seizes up the rotor belts won't last long at all.

Before starting up for the season with the engine off and key in pocket I'll go up to the engine compartment and turn the separator over by hand, fairly easy to spin the rotor drive pulley by hand and see if something is catching somewhere.
 
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