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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For starters I'm a newbie here. Been a guest viewer for awhile. I now have a chance to buy a Gleaner G. I only do about 50 acres of barley each year (so its kind of a toy) and have always been an Allis fan. What kind of machine was the G. What should I look for or lookout for. Don't know whether gas or diesel, hydro or gear but thought with the depth of knowledge on this forum someone should have good advice. Also, (I know its a tough question without details) what should a G sell for? Thanks in advance
 

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Great combine!, dependable and easy to work on.. the 6 cyl gas engine is very dependable and tough, they were most common. I owned a dozen of those machines over the years. The variable speed drives on the gear driven models have to be kept up and make sure there are no loose wooden fan blades in the cleaning fans. Transmissions and final drives are trouble free. The cylinder bars on these machines must be in top notch shape (this is crucial to their performance) An all around good machine and probabaly not that expensive. If its a hydro or a diesel go for it!!
We never had the good fortune to run across either one as they were quite rare up here in Canada. Great capacity in standing wheat but you will have to slow down in barley..as with all makes.
 

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Cut my teeth on a Gleaner G. I'm with gleanerman. Great machine! We had a 1970 gear drive G with the 6 cyl gas. That engine was bullet proof. We had 23.1 tires on it and made that combine a beast in the mud. I remember many times being deep in the mud thinking no way are we getting out of this. You could pop that clutch in reverse and literally bring the back wheels off the ground. Many good memories with that combine. Good cylinder bars are a must as with any combine. Only thing we had to watch out for was the variable speed sheaves on the main shaft in the combine. They had a brass bushing in there that once it started to wear a little it would allow the sheave to wobble on the shaft and start taking out splines. I'd be sure to check that area over good. Really a good simple machine that didn't have many weak spots. I've seen a few hydro models. I believe they only made those in their last season of production which if I remember correctly was 1972. I would recommend trying to find a later model. I think the earlier ones didn't have allis-chalmers manufactured cabs on them. The allis cab was really pretty nice for its day. Also the manufactured heavy duty wire mesh bin extensions would be good to have. I think with the extensions that bin would hold about 145 bushels of wheat. We later took an A/C unit of a later model F and put on the G. Cold air even made it better. Here in Kansas if the combine has decent bars and tires it would maybe bring 500 to 600 dollars. Pretty much salvage values. If you can find a well cared for G it will have a lot hours left in it for you.
 

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I could be totally wrong but I'm pretty sure it wasn't until maybe the late 60's that Gleaner started producing their own cab. I was really young when my Dad ran CII's but I think I remember them with Comfort King cabs on them and others in the area had Comfort King also. I think Comfort King cabs was located in Newton, Ks and made many other cabs for other lines of equipment during the 60's. Could be totally wrong on this. I know where there's a few CII's still running. I'll try to find some time during harvest and look at their cabs.
 

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A G is a good combine. The best of its day. If I were you I would definately buy a 72 diesel. Probably come with a 20 ft header or so. Old G's clean like new combines do now. The diesel is very dependable, you don't have to work on it very much. No point in messing with carburators when you can get a diesel instead.72 will have A/C you can get hydro or variable speed. We have variable speed and it works pretty well.
 

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Most cabs up until the late 60's were NOT Gleaner. A lot of them were made by Ansel. They were out of Ulysses, Kansas. Many, many, machines came from the plant with an Ansel cab already installed.
 

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We had a CII that had the gleaner cab, I will try and find a photo of it with its 24 foot head. Those cabs were warm in summer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well I bought the Allis G. It was at auction. Drove it about 10 miles to a friends farm for the nite (ran out of daylight). Will complete the trip home tomorrow (another 8 miles). She ran better as she went along. The owner is 94 years old and has been in a nursing home for the past 4 years so it hasn't been run for that long. Family decided to have a clearing auction. A brother in his early 80's says it worked real good (apparently 14 kids in the family). In pretty decent shape (not perfect by any means). Has a Dickey John monitor system on it that appears to work. It is a 1969 model with the turbo diesel (but not hydro). Has a draper head and straight cut head. I didn't get a great price but 2 other guys started the bidding by getting into a bidding war. Thought I wasn't even going to bid but I did. Paid a bit north of $2500 Cdn but prices up here seem to be higher than in the US. Hope you don't mind all the above history. Now what should I do to get her ready. I'm going to change all the fluids, but what else should I do or look for. Any and all maintenance, fix'r upper ideas would be appreciated. Please be as specific as you can because you guys have forgotten 5 times as much as I'll ever know about these units. After all the good stuff said about the model G in the earlier posts I'm both proud and excited to have one. I now want to put her back in her glory. P.S. I also have an E and an Allcrop 72. I guess I'm Allis to the core.
 

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Congratulations on buying your "G". Here's a tip on servicing the variable speed setup on the mainshaft if it is ever necessary... The outer sheave is fastened to the shaft via a tapered spline and Locktited to shaft. Remove the dowel pins and make up a "U" shaped puller to use with a portapower or hydraulic jack. Bolt the puller to the sheave using two of the dowel pin holes. Fasten a safety chain to the sheave. Put pressure on the puller and now heat the hub with a rosebud on your torch.. you will need lots of heat, (an ordinary torch won't do)
When the Locktite lets go the sheave will come off with a bang (hence the safety chain). Service the unit and reasemble with Locktite ( you MUST use Locktite) and torque up as tight as possible. I learned this the hard way as did a neighbour. A new sheave and shaft will cost as much as you paid for the whole machine. Glad to hear you are going to put her back to her origional glory, we used to run one through our shop every winter with that goal in mind.
 

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At the bottom of the feeder chains there is a door under the combine after the cylinder door. That door will give you access to the bottom of the chains. There are two idlers in there that will be frozen up most likely. They need to spin free. You may be able to work them free but if not you will have to change them.
 

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Have to agree with the other posts Ran a 72 [chevy 350] for over 30 years It was a brute for its time Bought a R42 last year so old girl sitting in shed If you or anyone else would like I would sell or part it out Also have 18ft[Hart Carter] good shape and GL430 GL435 cornheads All units allways shedded I'm in NE Indiana Thanks
 

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That may be why I thought they were regular Allis cabs. They came from the factory that way. I know some older farmers who either have or did have AII's, CII's and G's with those cabs--from the factory, stock on their then brand-new combines. The old style cabs may have been made by a sub, to Gleaner specs. In fact, such is the case with John Deere today, using McLaughlin-made cabs for Maximizers and STS'.

The old factory cabs had a uniquely round-edged roof and flat windshield. It was not until 1972, with the new Model L's debut, that the new style, curved glass cab came out. Later that windshield took on a thrust or "pouched-out" style, reminiscent of certain television screens in the 1970's.

Daled2, congrats on the purchase. Sorry you had to bid so high, though. Still, anytime you can get a good, running combine of that capacity, for under $3,000 is a very good deal and it will make short work of only 50 acres of any given crop.
 
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