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I've always wondered what kind of capacity Gleaners have in heavy irrigated wheat and corn? I guess I'm more specifically asking about the S98. I'm concerned you would be limited by rotor loss in heavy wheat caused by the heavy straw since there's not a lot of time for separation in the rotor. Also, how does the feederhouse do feeding all that straw? How about feeding tall sunflowers? Could an S98 handle an 18 row 20" Geringhoff Rota-Disc header in irrigated corn? We currently run a Deere S690, so that's what I'm comparing with. In my opinion, the STS is a terrible wheat combine. We have regretted the STS in wheat ever since we traded the 9600 off for our first Deere rotary. In corn, soybeans, and sunflowers, it's decent, but still burns way too much fuel and throws out too much for my liking. The chronic issue we have with it is overloading the one side of the shoe and throwing grain out (namely the left side), and it has too much rotor loss in heavy crops (especially wheat and wet corn). Would a Gleaner have less loss in these situations and burn less fuel? The S690 seems to burn anywhere from 1.7-2.1 gallons per acre. Also, what's the resale on these machines? Sorry for all the questions, I guess it's my first post so there's a lot of things I've always wanted to ask馃槀
 

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We cut plenty of heavy irrigated wheat. The s 97-s-78 seam to have plenty of capacity in easy threshing varieties. We can thrash 1800bu. Per hour. A lot of the time being north of that. Wide open screens and concave around.2. The lose seams to be minimal and we can walk through pivots much faster than our neighbors with s670s. We also cut with more moisture.
 

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For wheat the Gleaner is the ultimate. Our S98 has the sweeps and our S78 doesn't. We can run our concave about twice as wide as our S78 and at a slower rpm. This really makes it a fuel mizer. I would say about 1 gallon per acre flat country to maybe 1.25 gallon per hour in the hills. We are dryland but anything under 100 bpa gets to be disappointing. Usually hit 140 in some fields and with good moisture will hit 150 in one field at least. Feeding straw isn't an issue. We run steep hills with level land and i don't see any more loss than green or red with a hillside leveling system as there are no level land red or green combines here.
 

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I got an S98 this season and we have had a rain so what went out the back is showing up now. I'm pleasantly surprised how little wheat there was. Through out some barley as there were some small grains in it but my neighbor's Red headers were far more greener paddocks. Anyhow Roundup has now fixed all that.
I had one paddock doing 6-8 t/h in spots and I expected there to be grain on the ground but there was hardly any.
The monitor each paddock was saying fuel usage around 1.2 litres per ton.
My biggest disappointment was the useless fridge they put in.
No problems feeding at all and we had our best yields ever this year.
Get a demo
 

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Thanks for all your guy鈥檚 input. Sounds like an impressive machine. We鈥檝e been quite disgusted with the STS in irrigated wheat. No matter what we do, the volunteer stand is so good after combining we wish it were winter wheat so we could just let it go.馃槀 Like I mean, we were going 1.5 mph in 120 bu/ac wheat and the losses were still horrendous. Upon doing multiple power shutdowns, we found that it seemed that the rotor was just roping and twisting the wet straw through, carrying the grain right out the back of the rotor. It also dumping it all on the left side of the combine, due to centrifugal force. Subsequently, the left side of the chaffer was overloaded, resulting in high losses there too. Our dealer was of no help when we asked them what to do, they told us to put separator grate covers on it to even out the shoe load. Sure, it may even out shoe load, but it would make the rotor loss even more ridiculous! The problem is the piss-poor design of the combine. That feeder house on the Gleaner must be absolutely cooking to feed and have a nice thin crop mat!? How even is the loading of the shoe in various conditions with the Gleaner? Does it ever overload one side?Also, have any of you guys had it in corn? I鈥檓 just concerned with corn because I鈥檝e never seen one with more than a 12 row head on, and a majority I see run an 8 row.
 

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The cage is quite open all the way around. Here is a view from the back while the engine was removed on one of ours last winter. The engine was one that had excess oil usage so was replaced. Once the grain comes through the cage there are distribution augers below that spread out the material the width of the shoe. Then it goes through accelerator rolls shooting it down through an air blast and now a perforated cascade pan removing the heavier grain before it even gets to the shoe. It really is an amazing system.

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"That feeder house has to be absolutely cooking to feed and have a nice thin crop mat!?". Well yes, it is, but you really need to look beyond that to understand how it works so well. Look at the feeder house opening on a Gleaner and compare it to a comparable AF combine of most any other make. Looks pretty dinky. Now, look at the feed opening to the rotor of the AF versus the transverse Gleaner. The opening on the Gleaner is about the same as the feeder house width. Now look at the AF. You've got this capacious feeder house trying to feed into a dinky rotor opening. They do it, but it takes a lot of extra engineering fuss and bother. Anyway, that's why the Gleaner feeder house is the size it is, it just doesn't need to be any bigger.
 

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The cage is quite open all the way around. Here is a view from the back while the engine was removed on one of ours last winter. The engine was one that had excess oil usage so was replaced. Once the grain comes through the cage there are distribution augers below that spread out the material the width of the shoe. Then it goes through accelerator rolls shooting it down through an air blast and now a perforated cascade pan removing the heavier grain before it even gets to the shoe. It really is an amazing system.

View attachment 161525
Glenn, I'm just curious: why did they cover or blank off that last section of the cage before the discharge? Just seems like a guy loses some separation area.
 

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Glenn, I'm just curious: why did they cover or blank off that last section of the cage before the discharge? Just seems like a guy loses some separation area.
It is an area that plugs outside the cage in some conditions. Remember for the most part we are cutting 80-110 degree low humidity days. By that point the grain should be threshed out. That area is only chewing up straw more and pushing it through the cage and we have had that end block up sometimes from over threshing.
 

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The cage is quite open all the way around. Here is a view from the back while the engine was removed on one of ours last winter. The engine was one that had excess oil usage so was replaced. Once the grain comes through the cage there are distribution augers below that spread out the material the width of the shoe. Then it goes through accelerator rolls shooting it down through an air blast and now a perforated cascade pan removing the heavier grain before it even gets to the shoe. It really is an amazing system.

View attachment 161525
Is that a cover that bolts on to the cage on the bottom left side? I've had issues with my shelbourne stripper header cleaning well and that seems like it would help some.
 

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Is that a cover that bolts on to the cage on the bottom left side? I've had issues with my shelbourne stripper header cleaning well and that seems like it would help some.

I don't think that cover would help with cleaning. It is a little late in the process for that. Sounds like you need some filler bars on the concave where the crop first comes in so that the concave can thresh your grain more before being pushed on through the cage.

The cover in my picture is supposed to help keep it from plugging on the outside of the cage as sometimes too much material comes through the cage that doesn't need to come through. Something like this picture in our chick peas.

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Man, thats a case of a picture being worth a thousand words!
Isn't that the truth and they aren't all nice words. The chickpeas are so sensitive. Some fields were tougher and some easier. Open the door to see your surprise. Only notice when the sample in the bin changes from what you have been used to seeing.

Other problem is the tilt from the hills affecting the operation.
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Isn't that the truth and they aren't all nice words. The chickpeas are so sensitive. Some fields were tougher and some easier. Open the door to see your surprise. Only notice when the sample in the bin changes from what you have been used to seeing.

Other problem is the tilt from the hills affecting the operation.
View attachment 161623
Are you running the plate that bolts under the bottom right in front of the chopper also? I had problems in soybeans with it plugging and it seemed to be starting down there. After installing that plate I ended up taking the top one off and didn't have any issues after that.
 

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Glenn, we bought 2 S77's before fall harvest with sock rotor set-ups, both cages after the first day of harvesting looked like your picture. WE SET THE ROTOR ON ONE OF THEM EXACTLY LIKE OUR S97 LESS THRESHER SWEEPS, problem went away and rotor loss went back to normal. Next morning the second machine was plugged, did the same thing to it with same results, after that all three machines had clean cages all fall. Get rid of all reverse bars, install minimum three sweeps on sep. end, take off helicals o but for best results in our conditions we run three sweeps on thresher end and 9 sweeps on sep. end, hope this helps and by the way corncob, you won't be disappointed if you switch to Gleaner and class 7's are all you need to do the job.
 

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Glenn, we bought 2 S77's before fall harvest with sock rotor set-ups, both cages after the first day of harvesting looked like your picture. WE SET THE ROTOR ON ONE OF THEM EXACTLY LIKE OUR S97 LESS THRESHER SWEEPS, problem went away and rotor loss went back to normal. Next morning the second machine was plugged, did the same thing to it with same results, after that all three machines had clean cages all fall. Get rid of all reverse bars, install minimum three sweeps on sep. end, take off helicals o but for best results in our conditions we run three sweeps on thresher end and 9 sweeps on sep. end, hope this helps and by the way corncob, you won't be disappointed if you switch to Gleaner and class 7's are all you need to do the job.
Thanks for the tips. We have the sweeps in the 98 but none in the 78.

Actually ours ran well through most of our chickpeas. The plug mess came from an unusual field at the end. They ran good on the rest of the chickpeas. This field was our highest elevation field at treeline to the Forest. First time in at least 25 years it has been attempted to be spring cropped because typically a 30 plus inch rainfall area that just can't be seeded until summer. Seeded about 1 week later than the rest of our chickpeas but it was a dry winter/spring so the wet spots did dry out in early May. Fast forward to the late summer and the Oregon/California wildfire smoke came into the area in some of the worst conditions ever when burn down time came. Roundup just doesn't work on smokey days. Air sucked, attitude sucked, just glad to get it done but the plants just weren't consistent in dryness from burn down. Couldn't see very far across the field. Glad to park and drove 500 miles to get out of the smoke. My eyes are burning just looking at this picture.

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Glenn, we bought 2 S77's before fall harvest with sock rotor set-ups, both cages after the first day of harvesting looked like your picture. WE SET THE ROTOR ON ONE OF THEM EXACTLY LIKE OUR S97 LESS THRESHER SWEEPS, problem went away and rotor loss went back to normal. Next morning the second machine was plugged, did the same thing to it with same results, after that all three machines had clean cages all fall. Get rid of all reverse bars, install minimum three sweeps on sep. end, take off helicals o but for best results in our conditions we run three sweeps on thresher end and 9 sweeps on sep. end, hope this helps and by the way corncob, you won't be disappointed if you switch to Gleaner and class 7's are all you need to do the job.
Glenn, we bought 2 S77's before fall harvest with sock rotor set-ups, both cages after the first day of harvesting looked like your picture. WE SET THE ROTOR ON ONE OF THEM EXACTLY LIKE OUR S97 LESS THRESHER SWEEPS, problem went away and rotor loss went back to normal. Next morning the second machine was plugged, did the same thing to it with same results, after that all three machines had clean cages all fall. Get rid of all reverse bars, install minimum three sweeps on sep. end, take off helicals o but for best results in our conditions we run three sweeps on thresher end and 9 sweeps on sep. end, hope this helps and by the way corncob, you won't be disappointed if you switch to Gleaner and class 7's are all you need to do the job.
Hey gleaner r72, just bought an s77, up here were used to running two deere walkers, 70 to 110 bu wheat. We trying to bale straw after small squares and 3x4x7 large. See you guys talking about things above, do you know of anything besides the obvious impeller vs chopper, slowing rotor down to help straw survive? Why do you take helicals out? When going back to soy or corn would we want to change anything back. Thanks guys, also looking for some measurements, started post "s77 transport width" be glad if anyone else has some thoughts.
 

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Hey gleaner r72, just bought an s77, up here were used to running two deere walkers, 70 to 110 bu wheat. We trying to bale straw after small squares and 3x4x7 large. See you guys talking about things above, do you know of anything besides the obvious impeller vs chopper, slowing rotor down to help straw survive? Why do you take helicals out? When going back to soy or corn would we want to change anything back. Thanks guys, also looking for some measurements, started post "s77 transport width" be glad if anyone else has some thoughts.
If you are going to bale straw you will have better results with an impeller with sweeps and no reverse bars. We take off the helicals on the sep. door only for better separation in beans and corn. We run same rotor set-up for wheat and beans, for corn we take off all sweeps and run one reverse bar in each row, total of four. I also would leave helicals in for wheat.
 

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If you are going to bale straw you will have better results with an impeller with sweeps and no reverse bars. We take off the helicals on the sep. door only for better separation in beans and corn. We run same rotor set-up for wheat and beans, for corn we take off all sweeps and run one reverse bar in each row, total of four. I also would leave helicals in for wheat.
Thanks for both comments, more on set up here than I have read searching for it
 
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