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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We've always had our crops custom harvested so I haven't had much experience with combines. I recently decided I wanted to learn about them. What better way than to buy an old combine (low cost entry point) and start using it and working on it?

So I decided to buy a 1480 after some research. They're pretty cheap, you can get parts for them easily, everyone has advice for how to run them, etc. I found and bought a combine and have been working on it trying to get it serviceable for fall harvest.

Recently though, because of some threads on newagtalk, I've started looking at N7's. They seem to be pretty much the same price as the 1480, but I hear the capacity is closer to what a 2388 would be, assuming you can keep it running. I'm beginning to wonder if I should have started my learning curve with an N7 just because it has so much more capacity for about the same amount of money. Any thoughts? Thanks.
 

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Had a 2388 in our field with our N7 and R72 a couple years ago. Having never ran a 2388 I figured it would be equal with the 72 but the Case salesman told me it was about equal to our N7.

Matt
 

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Well we have had mixed luck with it. We have ran gleaners for a good 30 years now. It ran great the first year we had it. We had no problems. Then the second year the hydro locked up on us the first day into harvest. The guy who had it before us i guess put a grease zerk up in there to grease a bearing or something like that im not sure anymore. Anyways, It works great if you know its up there, but we didnt so the bearing went out and fused to the case. So the machine was down for the rest of the year and we rented the R 72 and kept cutting. The year after that we ran into issues with lack of power. Finally narrowed it down to a worn out fuel pump and collapsed fuel hose. Sent in the fuel pump and that took a week to get back so that was a good chunk of harvest that year too. Finally after we got that resolved it ran for the remaining week of harvest and did a pretty good job. Last year we had a poor crop so we left it in the yard and just cut everything with our 72.

If you looked just at the breakdown time for the years we have had the machine you would say it has been very unreliable. However, being the eternal optimist that all farmers usually are if you look at what went out you will notice that these are not things that happen regularly. Whether it is a string of bad luck or a lemon idk. It was well used when we bought that machine so we knew it would take a while to get it up to snuff. Our n6 that was the same year as this N7 was a great combine and ran it for years, as is our R72. I am hopeful that this year we will get it in the field and should run well since we have made some pretty significant repairs to it.

Matt
 

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I hate to say it, but, a N7 will be quite a bit larger than a 1480. Maybe close in corn or beans, but a standard rotor 1480 will not stay with a N7 in small grains.

We traded a 1480 for a R60, the R60 had more capacity, but, was in the shop more too. The old 1480 was a tough machine, almost maintenance free. 10 min of greasing in the morning and go all day.

I did get to run my friends 2188 with his uncles R70 harvesting swathed wheat 2yrs ago, man they where close, if anything the 2188 did a little more, not much though (i think they turned it up).
I will say this for the axial flows, they are very very reliable, but if you go from wheat to barley to
you have to change the concaves which for a young man is not a big deal at all. For someone up in age, it may be a pain in the arrrss.
John
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies guys. I got a chance to look at a 1992 R72 that needed every belt except the rotor belt replaced as well as a really really beat up N7 (hadn't been running for 5 years). The only reason I looked at the N7 was because I wanted to see the mechanical differences between the two. My dad was with me and he said the nice thing about the 72 was that it didn't need the cage sweep. Said that if the cage sweep failed on the N7 it would build up and blow the doors open and then you would have material on the engine to start a fire. After seeing the N7 next to the R72 and seeing all the improvements, I lost my thunder a little on the N7.

Sorry it took me so long to reply. I don't know how to make this forum email me when people reply. On most other forums it's easy to do but I just haven't yet found the option on this one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I just figured out how to do it. You go to your profile and then click on bookmarks. You will see "manage bookmarks". Click on that. You'll see "By default, when you bookmark a thread, what type of notification would you like to receive when a new post is made in that thread?"

Select "Email".

You have to bookmark any thread that you want to know has been replied to, which isn't difficult. Not quite as easy as some other forums, but still workable.
 

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You guys have to remember these N7's are going on 25 plus years old, of course they are going to break down. Most at that time were sold to big operators and custom harvesters, if you are lucky to find a decent one get an 83 and up with under 2000 hours and you may be ok, again it all comes down to the previous owners maintenance and repairs.
 

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I am looking at one with 3300 hours and the want $12,000. I am guessing it's around an '85 since it says Deutz Allis on the side. It sure looks like its in good condition. I've heard a lot of bad things about the N-series, but was wondering if a little later one might be alright.
 

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clinton005, I just acquired my first Gleaner N6 this last winter. So far wheat use only. Once getting it figured out for settings it appears to do more than my neighbours JD9600 series, and it's not far behind if any with thier 2388 with mods. Less than $10,000 into it and so far other than a plugged fuel cap vent no problems, no breakdowns.
Low cost to buy in, fast efficient with a good bin capacity and so far dependability. What more could a guy want for the $ spent. So far i'm right satisfied with my new series 3 N6.
Good luck,
Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon
 

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That's good to know. It's sounding like the Series 3 were quite a bit better machines than the earlier ones. Like you said it seems like a big machine for the money. Sure looks a lot simpler to service than our 860 Massey. Thanks.
 

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If it says Deutz-Allis on it then thats as good as it gets for an N7, with the exception of color(chassis,rims,cab) its identical to an R7. I know a few of those that have run lots of hours. I would however updated it to a Sunnybrook concave and enclosed rotor. Also the motors were a lot more reliable in the 7's vs the 6's. The 426 in the 6's were very prone to failure
 

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So if you had to pick which one was a better overall machine which one would you say? The N7 or the 1480? I am also looking at an N7. I like the idea of big capacity for a reasonable price, but that's useless if its always broke down.
 

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Well it doesn't sound like too bad of machine then. One more question. What if I wanted to bale some barley straw behind one of these? Is that doable or no way?
 

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Also the series 3 will hook up to the newer heads but not sure what year was the cutoff. Series 2 you had to modify either the throat or the header to fit the series 3. I use the same head on the R50 and N6. It's hard to find a good series 2 head. I thought hard too before we went to an N series. The mechanic said the biggest problem was the lack of maintenance on the combine. You can get thru alot of acres in a day and many people didn't grease regularly. They are easy to work on except the inner bearing on the top shaft on the rear feed chain. Luckily that bearing doesn't give much problems. You can bale behind one of these if it doesn't have a chopper. Now it is not nearly as good as a conventional to bale behind. There is also a zerk on the main machine clutch underneath that I found out the hard way too. I read the book but missed this one. Also make sure the cage is good and good rotor bars and the helicals (spirals) on the inside are good. This can rob power. Also the Accelator rolls need to be in good condition. That is a unique part to the N and R's and good idea. Good luck. Greg
 

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I'll definitely check those things out when I visit this dealer next. One more question. How many cubic inches is the N7 engine? I've
heard 685 C.I. and 516 C.I. My appraisal book says 516 but all I know for sure is the 270 hp.
 
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