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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So we're building a new bin yard and wondering how steep a guy can build his driveway. I'm sure the ideal slope is something like 1 percent grade but we have to go steeper than that unless we have switchbacks. But would 6 percent be to steep? Or 8? Planning to have it almost level for 100 feet by the road and then descend from there into the yard.

Also could a guy put a hopper bin skid right on clay and then add abit of gravel to keep your boots clean? Or do you NEED gravel under the skid itself?
 

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I’ve seen hoppers on skids tip too many times to never ever want to not have some concrete under the skid. My favourite way now of placing hoppers is to make a concrete pad about a foot thick around where the skid will sit and then leave the skid on and place it on the concrete.

Benefit being it’s way easier to level forms then it is clay and gravel. Crooked bins makes you look like a cheap farmer and that’s just stupid…

Plus it’s really easy to use concrete wedge bolts to anchor the hopper down. That way you don’t make the combine forum wall of shame when a wind blows and your empty bins tip over.
 

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So am I reading this right the trucks potentially could be leaving loaded going up a steepish grade? That might make some of the steering wheel holder drivers distressed a bit
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes leaving loaded going up a sloped driveway. The yard is level. Where you stop at the road will be level. So you can get moving on a level surface and just have to hold you speed on the slope.
So how about 4 percent?
 

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4 feet elevation on a 100? I’ve seen worse. Wouldn’t be the worst if you have a landing at the top and bottom. No way to lengthen it out in a loop?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
We could make it kinda like a snake I guess. Then if you do spin out you slide sideways. Was thinking straight like the owner is would be better though.

Also I do not plan to go right on clay with the bins but figured of someone else had done such I could get by with 6 inches of gravel instead of a foot. And I don't have money for concrete. 😭 Just anchors
 

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6in of gravel on hard pack clay is fine. The clay needs to be hard. I’m not sure how many times we have had to left bins and level them but we have become very good at it in last 10 yrs.
 

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So am I reading this right the trucks potentially could be leaving loaded going up a steepish grade? That might make some of the steering wheel holder drivers distressed a bit

I think i'd rather drive up a slight grade than be stuck in a muddy sinkhole because of bad drainage.

I stumbled upon a pdf from the Rural Municipalities of Alberta that outlined proper slopes a few years ago. If i remember right it was 4% for crown on a road and 1.5 to 2% for parking lots and other gravelled areas.
 

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I’ve seen hoppers on skids tip too many times to never ever want to not have some concrete under the skid. My favourite way now of placing hoppers is to make a concrete pad about a foot thick around where the skid will sit and then leave the skid on and place it on the concrete.
I agree with 90420. Why the skids? I priced out some triple skids and was surprised they are 3500 bucks now with the steel surcharge. Concrete might end up being cheaper and Also it is always easier to keep the bin area cleaner without a skid. Its always a pain when sweeping up grain inside the skid. Also with 17 inch thick concrete base you dont have to worry about ground shifting. 6 inches of gravel is risky. If you cant afford concrete it might be pushing your operating expenses with hopper bins. If you are worried about the cost of concrete maybe see if you can include the concrete in with the bin lease.
good luck
 

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6% is fine if you have a level place to stop at the road intersection, I wouldn’t go steeper. Where do you live, do you get winter conditions (snow/ice)? Traction will be a big deal if so if super B’s (especially empty). If constant gravel contact for traction then no problem.

Concrete bin foundations is best and cleanest, but I just set my hoppers on clay with gravel cap and they are straight, have uniformly sunk in the ground about 3-4”. Cost prohibitive here for concrete, plus if I have to liquidate the hoppers set on the ground can be moved easily anywhere. Biggest hoppers are 1806 though.
 

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You do realize a 6% grade means your climbing almost 6ft in the length of a super B. You can hardly comfortable walk on a grade like that never mind run 4 or 5 loaded trucks on 1 or 2inchs of snow and see what happens.

I’ve driven truck enough in my life to know I would never build any kind of yard with a 6% grade in western Canada that needs super B access. I’ve used enough tire chains in my younger days to know the limits of trucks and roads and most custom grain haulers don’t buy winter tires other then Q line in my experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Agree with dumbfarmer I would never build a yard with 6 percent slope. But this is the drive I'm talking about.
The more I think about it the more I agree with Newfarmer that 6 percent should work. We hafta pull a 7 percent slope to one canola crusher and a long 8 percent north facing slope to the other crusher so ALL our canola goes up either one of those (mostly the 8 percent one). And sadly I'm not in control of when those hills get snow cleared but my drive I can clear snow if I'm gonna haul grain.

Also sounds like I should have priced out concrete. A couple years ago skids were way cheaper when I priced both and this time I just ordered skids. It was last fall pricing though before steel really changed...
 

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Back when we had local grain elevators and rail transport, I believe the elevators were 6-8 feet higher than the road to them. The length of the road to them would have been no more than 100 feet.
 
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