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Discussion Starter #1
I was fortunate to be able to talk to Ron Palmer and was able to learn on how long it would take to dry. If you want any more info then can look up Ron's blog that has lots of good info. Grain Aeration – The process of grain aeration

I do believe what pami is suggesting is wrong by saying by only looking at the emc charts and can telling if your drying. I believe that in order to tell if your drying would have to look at the grain temp and then the outside conditions.

Also there is good conditions in the spring if one wants to take a few points out. Just got to look at the nearest weather station to you.

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I find that spring conditions usually have low humidity and it can be the best time to dry grain, fall humidity is usually higher so most of the time I only worry about cooling grain rather than drying in the fall.
 

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Yes, but atleast now I know how long does it take. Glad I found the answer otherwise just shooting in the dark.
 

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Yes, but atleast now I know how long does it take. Glad I found the answer otherwise just shooting in the dark.
Remember your estimates of drying time are only as good as your weather forcast accuracy. Once you start drying in the spring you can’t stop. Make sure the forcast is stable before starting to natural air dry a bin of frozen grain in the spring.
 

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What I also learnt is to look at the Kpa from the weather station. As the pressure goes down the humidity goes up is what google told me. So I looked at past years and for our area when it above 95 kpa then it is perfect drying weather and can keep the fans on all the time. But if the presure drops 1 Kpa in a half a day might mean the fans got to be turned off for the night.
 
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