The Combine Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are looking at starting our grain facility. We are going to start out with a 10,000 bu wet bin, 2 10,000 bu storage bins, a dryer, one elevator to unload trucks and one to unload the dryer. The highest elevator is going to be 60 some feet tall. What is everyone's opinion about installing these? My family has a construction and grading company and a lot of metal erection experience, but never installed a grain facility. We feel very comfortable installing the bins, but not so sure about the elevator. How do the elevators go together? How do you put the buckets in the trunking?

Thanks any advice will be appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
880 Posts
the buckets are mounted on the belt and you slowly rotate them i think. 60ft tower? i'd make it a bit higher, just incase you want to add taller bins later further away, just my 2cts.
erecting bins is not hard as long as you have the jacks to do so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So the elevator isn't that complicated either?

We were spouting to a drag on top of the first bin and setting future bins in a straight line to help eliminate some height. As we unload the trucks this will be on our right and if we want bigger bins there is a slope to the left we will have an elevation change of aboht 10 foot so it won't be so hard to spout to them. I may try to go to 70-80 if funds allow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,919 Posts
Tower all the way, stairs around it. A lot easier to climb for service. I have 2 60' legs, erected after most of the bins, so I am using drag conveyors to move the grain. If you are starting from scratch I would seriously consider a taller leg initially. The boot and the head are the most expensive parts, trunking is not a bad. Consider a 90-100'. Also would look at bigger storage bins, unless you are doing specialty crops, or eliminate one of the bins and go to one big one. There will be some cost savings there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What's the difference between a tower and just normal elevator?

Why don't you like using the drag to feed the bins?

Ideally what will happen is use this setup and keep adding bins in the straight row for a few years. When we expand our acreage enough for a second combine we would like to add a second unload pit to speed up harvest.

As for bin size we switch between corn and soybeans or wheat and barley in season and need the variety. The biggest two reasons for doing this is being able to cut when our local elevator is closed and being able to dry our grain to increase marketing options. We know we can't hold hardly any of the product we grow but it will help speed harvest by being able to cut when weather is good then haul out on rainy days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,919 Posts
Tower is a square structure that the legs will set inside of. Far more stability than just putting up the legs and using guy wires for support. A tower will also have a staircase with it to allow easier access for the top of the legs, otherwise without a tower you will be climbing a ladder. I have no problem with using the drag conveyor to feed my bins, but I also did not have a choice as the legs were put up after most of the bins. If you made your leg tall enough to eliminate the drag, you also eliminate a motor, and motors are often fail points of a system. But it the topography of where you a re outing the grain system dictates that the bins be in a straight line then the drag is your best bet. I would also consider using a pit conveyor instead of a dump pit for unloading trucks/wagons. You can size these up to match your leg, and you don't have to worry about a pit filling up with water.

I've got all kinds of ideas to help you spend your money!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok that makes sense. I think I will be using gsi and are planning to use the high flight unload conveyor. So we are good there.

I am planning to unload the bins by vertical augers.

The option the Brock dealer gave me was to do a bigger dryer, smaller wet tank, and 2 16k bins, an air system for the dryer. And portable augers to fill all the bins. I don't like the idea of portables.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,919 Posts
Keep wet bin size up, it can always be storage later. Bigger dryer always is good. Negative on the portable augers. Air systems, or blow jobs as I call them, are loud, slow, and inefficient.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Our millwright has a winch on a truck. Pull that out and up over the head of the leg. Then back down and out to hook onto the belt (complete with cups). Then they pull it into the trunking and connect each end together. You have to leave a few cups out to attach things. They have pieces made that bolt onto the belt that you can pull it tight and attach the clamp of the two ends of the belt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Sounds like your going with either GSI or Brock bins both are good choices, if your in an area that can have high gusts of wind or severe weather being that your on the east coast spend the extra money and get the stiffeners on all the bins. For us, one storm took out 3 unstiffened bins and one stiffened but it happened to be empty with a total of 100,000 bu of storage and left us with corn exposed to the elements. The neighbors with stiffened bins that were full didn't budge an inch. We'll never build a bin without ever again. Just my 2 cents.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Talked with our Brock guy more. He got the wet size up for me. As for the air systems, how are they for unloading the dryer? Seems like a cost effective way to do it which is what we are wanting right now.

On the dryer he has priced us a sq12 which is a full heat dryer. What are your opinions on full heat or should i try to step it up to a sq16 M model where its pressure heat and cool? I know I would have to cool in bin with the full heat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
If you already have fans capable of cooling in bin I've never understood why anyone wouldn't dump hot and cool in bin, at least around here (eatern Iowa). Heating and then cooling in dryer is just so inefficient and slow that the loss of drying capacity per hour to do it that way would slow us up terribly at harvest. We run a Sukup Cyclone air system transferring corn from a MC Legacy dryer which is nice because its the expandable series so we can always stack more sections for more capacity. Our air tube goes vertically about 60ft up the sidewall of our bin and never had a problem with it. Other than it being extremely loud, air is a great option.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top