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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
How many guys run there dryers on gensets?

looking at a GSI dryer and a walinga air pump, was wondering what everyone used for generator size, and if anyone had a setup like this already that I could get a bit more info from.

any info about your setups with any dryer and supporting equipment ran off generators would be greatly appreciated

Thinking a 125KW genset as the air pump is a 50hp motor plus dryer and wet auger. would also like to power a couple 5 hp fans off it as well.

lets see what you got.
 

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Genset sizing will depend on voltage that you intend to run. Are you going to have everything dedicated to the gen or will you have some running on the power line. If you can run things on 480 volt your start up load is less.
 

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If your starting from scratch why not right to 600V?
Use 480 no matter what. There are warehouses full of motors and controls in Edmonton. 480 is far more common than anything else. Just ask guys with 575v how easy it is to get replacement motors during harvest (2-3 weeks isn't unheard of)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Looking at 480V , everything will be off gen set as there is no power at all in yard we are installing at. Sask power wants over 100G to bring a line in to a yard I need power at 2 months of the year so easy decision.

thinking a 100-125kw gen set but want more opinions of what to do and not to from guys with experience on this.
 

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Grain Dryers on Gen set

Looking at 480V , everything will be off gen set as there is no power at all in yard we are installing at. Sask power wants over 100G to bring a line in to a yard I need power at 2 months of the year so easy decision.

thinking a 100-125kw gen set but want more opinions of what to do and not to from guys with experience on this.

I will double check tomorrow if I think about it to see the size our gen is but it runs the pit leg to wet tank auger to dryer the dryer auger to dry tank unload auger and 4 fans at one time
 

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I think that genset is too small. A 50 hp motor is going take a lot to start and once all the fans and air system are running, I doubt you have enough left to start a wet auger
 

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I run my Ibec 1212 with a 50KW 3 phase 208 volt genset. It runs a 15hp blower fan and the 7” wet and dry augers each have 3hp motors and it handles them fine. My air fans are run off a line that Dad trenched in a 1/4 mile from the farm yard. I think the rule of thumb for sizing genset is to size it for your motor with the largest starting amps.
 

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It's basic, design your system them take all your motor data plate reference to a competent generator salesman and he should be able to figure the size requirements for you. What someone else is running has no factor at all in your requirements.
 

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If you go with double the size of the largest motor you should be ok. So if a 50 hp motor is starting across the line then a 100 kw generator should supply enough starting current without suffering significant voltage drop in the generator winding. If you start that big motor with a vfd then you reduce starting current and can ultimately use a smaller generator. That is the gist of how you consider what is too big or too small for the job. This is based on you starting your biggest motor first before loading genset down with the smaller loads.

As for 480 vs 600v most of Canada is 600v and 480 v is American. Oil and gas sector seems to run on 480v. Old industries built say prior 1970 are typically 480v but anything built since then is 600v. 480v is more rare in Saskatchewan then 600v. Now if you are getting on a used equipment list and that list is tied to the US then you will see a lot of 480v listed. So it depends where you intend to buy your equipment from, the electrical distributor in Saskatoon or Regina or order from Ohio.
 

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How many guys run there dryers on gensets?

looking at a GSI dryer and a walinga air pump, was wondering what everyone used for generator size, and if anyone had a setup like this already that I could get a bit more info from.

any info about your setups with any dryer and supporting equipment ran off generators would be greatly appreciated

Thinking a 125KW genset as the air pump is a 50hp motor plus dryer and wet auger. would also like to power a couple 5 hp fans off it as well.

lets see what you got.
It is real handy to have everything on powerline but the cost to get hooked up and the monthly service charges make a genset look pretty attractive where you are only using it for a month or two every year. I run an old M and W 450 dryer on pto as it would have a 75 hp electric motor and the rest of my leg and handling system runs off an old Cat D315GT that is rated at 50 KW. It is old school so very big for its rating and has no trouble running whatever needs to run at one time. If grain is coming in, the leg at 25 Hp, pit auger at 10 hp, 1 or 2 conveyors at 7 1/2 hp each will be running. If grain is loading out or moving to a different bin the leg at 25 hp, one or two conveyors at 7 1/2 hp, one or more bin unload augers at 10 - 20 hp each will be running. The big leg max amperage is 62 at 230 volt but it will load a super b in 20 minutes at 45 amps so that is about the limit of the 10" spouts. I have a 2,000 bu/hr leg for take away from the dryer that is a light load, 5 hp, so run it on power line so the genset does not have to run if pulling an all nighter. One little thing that has made my genset more efficient is that it is in a good insulated shed. When it runs every day it is still warm the next morning for easy starts. I have a timer on the block heater that comes on every morning at 6 so when we are using it lots it is warm every day for quick easy starts. Makes using the generator pretty convenient. When grain is coming into the pit, there is a pressure switch in the bottom that starts the auger and conveyors. The leg just runs all the time. I have a power control shack with a 75/25 phase converter but because of installation cost for big single phase power (3 phase is right out to lunch here) I have never felt it was worth going that route. PM me if you have any more questions. I love what a well designed system can do, specially at harvest when there is so much work to do and with a little thought (actually a lot!) put into setup, I rarely have to touch or truck dry grain after it has been dumped into the pit off the combine.

I agree totally with comments about absolutely using 3 phase motors. I bought mostly used equipment and motors, all 230 or 208 volts and have never replaced a motor yet. But from experience I about double the recommended hp size on augers and have way less trouble. If you start your 50 hp 3 phase on the blower first you should be ok with 125 kw. What engine is on that 125?
 

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How many guys run there dryers on gensets?

looking at a GSI dryer and a walinga air pump, was wondering what everyone used for generator size, and if anyone had a setup like this already that I could get a bit more info from.

any info about your setups with any dryer and supporting equipment ran off generators would be greatly appreciated

Thinking a 125KW genset as the air pump is a 50hp motor plus dryer and wet auger. would also like to power a couple 5 hp fans off it as well.

lets see what you got.
It is real handy to have everything on powerline but the cost to get hooked up and the monthly service charges make a genset look pretty attractive where you are only using it for a month or two every year. I run an old M and W 450 dryer on pto as it would have a 75 hp electric motor and the rest of my leg and handling system runs off an old Cat D315GT that is rated at 50 KW. It is old school so very big for its rating and has no trouble running whatever needs to run at one time. If grain is coming in, the leg at 25 Hp, pit auger at 10 hp, 1 or 2 conveyors at 7 1/2 hp each will be running. If grain is loading out or moving to a different bin the leg at 25 hp, one or two conveyors at 7 1/2 hp, one or more bin unload augers at 10 - 20 hp each will be running. The big leg max amperage is 62 at 230 volt but it will load a super b in 20 minutes at 45 amps so that is about the limit of the 10" spouts. I have a 2,000 bu/hr leg for take away from the dryer that is a light load, 5 hp, so run it on power line so the genset does not have to run if pulling an all nighter. One little thing that has made my genset more efficient is that it is in a good insulated shed. When it runs every day it is still warm the next morning for easy starts. I have a timer on the block heater that comes on every morning at 6 so when we are using it lots it is warm every day for quick easy starts. Makes using the generator pretty convenient. When grain is coming into the pit, there is a pressure switch in the bottom that starts the auger and conveyors. The leg just runs all the time. I have a power control shack with a 75/25 phase converter but because of installation cost for big single phase power (3 phase is right out to lunch here) I have never felt it was worth going that route. PM me if you have any more questions. I love what a well designed system can do, specially at harvest when there is so much work to do and with a little thought (actually a lot!) put into setup, I rarely have to touch or truck dry grain after it has been dumped into the pit off the combine.

I agree totally with comments about absolutely using 3 phase motors. I bought mostly used equipment and motors, all 230 or 208 volts and have never replaced a motor yet. But from experience I about double the recommended hp size on augers and have way less trouble. If you start your 50 hp 3 phase on the blower first you should be ok with 125 kw. What engine is on that 125?
Jesus. I think you and swman have awesome setups!!
 

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It is real handy to have everything on powerline but the cost to get hooked up and the monthly service charges make a genset look pretty attractive where you are only using it for a month or two every year. I run an old M and W 450 dryer on pto as it would have a 75 hp electric motor and the rest of my leg and handling system runs off an old Cat D315GT that is rated at 50 KW. It is old school so very big for its rating and has no trouble running whatever needs to run at one time. If grain is coming in, the leg at 25 Hp, pit auger at 10 hp, 1 or 2 conveyors at 7 1/2 hp each will be running. If grain is loading out or moving to a different bin the leg at 25 hp, one or two conveyors at 7 1/2 hp, one or more bin unload augers at 10 - 20 hp each will be running. The big leg max amperage is 62 at 230 volt but it will load a super b in 20 minutes at 45 amps so that is about the limit of the 10" spouts. I have a 2,000 bu/hr leg for take away from the dryer that is a light load, 5 hp, so run it on power line so the genset does not have to run if pulling an all nighter. One little thing that has made my genset more efficient is that it is in a good insulated shed. When it runs every day it is still warm the next morning for easy starts. I have a timer on the block heater that comes on every morning at 6 so when we are using it lots it is warm every day for quick easy starts. Makes using the generator pretty convenient. When grain is coming into the pit, there is a pressure switch in the bottom that starts the auger and conveyors. The leg just runs all the time. I have a power control shack with a 75/25 phase converter but because of installation cost for big single phase power (3 phase is right out to lunch here) I have never felt it was worth going that route. PM me if you have any more questions. I love what a well designed system can do, specially at harvest when there is so much work to do and with a little thought (actually a lot!) put into setup, I rarely have to touch or truck dry grain after it has been dumped into the pit off the combine.

I agree totally with comments about absolutely using 3 phase motors. I bought mostly used equipment and motors, all 230 or 208 volts and have never replaced a motor yet. But from experience I about double the recommended hp size on augers and have way less trouble. If you start your 50 hp 3 phase on the blower first you should be ok with 125 kw. What engine is on that 125?
You have a very nice setup Transaxial. I am always admiring it any time I drive past it on the hwy. How many bushels will it hold?
 

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I would go with the highest voltage that is common for your area so parts are available. I would size it big enough. Our last stand by generator was a low hour used one from a hospital. 800kw 480 volt v-12 Cummins with 800 hours for 50000 US dollars. Our other one was a 150 kw single phase 240 volt that would push 600 amps
 

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We run a gsi with a forty hp walinga pump, 8 -10hp aeration and yard with a 175 kw ng unit . With everything running at 60% load
its 208v
if you can get ng unit very clean and tank is always full
 

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Something else on the basics of genset sizing.

You need a large generator (I mean specifically the unit hanging off the diesel) to have enough copper winding material to not suffer too much voltage drop when you start that big motor which draws 5 to 8x its running current for the first few seconds during startup. So going double the size of the generator of your biggest motor is a good rough number, at 2.5x you should definitely be fine. So 50 hp @ 2.5x = 125 kva. Generators should be rated by kva, you usually calculate kw from kva.

But the next thing is the diesel. For the reason just explained, you will 99% of the time have a generator bigger than what the diesel can produce in hp. Sometimes a generator can be 35% bigger, sometimes 15% bigger. The point being is everytime I ran a genset at full load in real life applications it was the engine (often the radiator) that was the limiting factor to what % load you put out of the generator.

So for operating a genset you are looking at 2 things: can you start your biggest motor and how well your engine runs. A poorly responding engine also makes it harder to start that big motor but that is another story.
 
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