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We have been talking about the doing the same with a empty roundup shuttle but didn't know if it would hold up to diesel fuel, but I guess I know the answer now.
 

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We have been talking about the doing the same with a empty roundup shuttle but didn't know if it would hold up to diesel fuel, but I guess I know the answer now.
We’ve used the same 2 totes for 2 years and so far they look fine. A bit of a yellow stain on the inside is all so far. If it gets weak after a few years I’ll just wash out another one. There’s about 50 of them lying around our house and more every year.
 

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Be very careful using plastic containers to haul fuel. Plastic can cause static electricity. (Boom good by joe) If DOT stops you look out!!
 

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The problem with plastic is breaking and leaking in the event if a collision... I think dot approved tanks for highway transport need to be 1/8" for tidy tanks and such.
It must be a volume thing because thinking about it.... cars and trucks have plastic fuel tanks, gas/diesel....

Yes DOT would loose their S^H^I^T if they saw totes full of diesel.... (just don't put a placard id'ing it!!)
 

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Plastic and liquid makes static. Used to have a video at work of a small, like a couple ounces, of hexane in a 5 gal pail swirl it around and boom.
 

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Yes DOT would loose their S^H^I^T if they saw totes full of diesel.... (just don't put a placard id'ing it!!)
All tanks must be DOT approved to haul fuel on public roadways in Canada. I know there are some non approved tanks out there being used and the DOT are losing their $hit over it.
I’m not telling anyone what to do, but check your provincial laws out before something goes wrong. Every year it seems we get regulated more on what we can and can’t do for transportation of all cargo.
 

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I had mentioned [I think] 1/8" thick steel is needed to for DOT approval in alberta. Reason is I was chatting with a hutterite welder, that makes tidy tanks, who said this.

Leads me to wonder what the regulations are in alberta with regards to tidy tank construction and capacity.
 

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They should just make a another thing to hook behind the aircart with 3000 gal of fuel. You could just flick a switch and fuel on the go and no time lost. You could call the fuel supplier and get a fill just like NH3 when filling aircart. . In my operation I would have the leading cart, then cultivator, then 4000 gal NH3, Then 3000 gal fuel wagon lol. It is almost getting to this point with the amount of fuel it takes to keep those def happy tractors rolling. Luckily my old versy burns about 150 gal a day and won't require this setup. My slip tank keeps me rolling each day with ease.
 

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Some of the nastiest chemicals I’ve ever worked with are hauled from China to northern Alberta in 1000 L totes. Bounced over winter roads stored for years and I’ve never seen a 1000 L tote fail or leak for any reason. I’ve poked them with the forks and they just stretch around like a balloon. I’m not saying that are stronger or better than slip tanks or metal but they are definitely rated for transportation of dangerous goods.
 

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Some of the nastiest chemicals I’ve ever worked with are hauled from China to northern Alberta in 1000 L totes. Bounced over winter roads stored for years and I’ve never seen a 1000 L tote fail or leak for any reason. I’ve poked them with the forks and they just stretch around like a balloon. I’m not saying that are stronger or better than slip tanks or metal but they are definitely rated for transportation of dangerous goods.
I'm sure once the substance is flammable rules change...
But I totally agree with you those totes are tough.
 

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Some of the nastiest chemicals I’ve ever worked with are hauled from China to northern Alberta in 1000 L totes. Bounced over winter roads stored for years and I’ve never seen a 1000 L tote fail or leak for any reason. I’ve poked them with the forks and they just stretch around like a balloon. I’m not saying that are stronger or better than slip tanks or metal but they are definitely rated for transportation of dangerous goods.
Ya. Except fuel is flammable and your knowingly using non approved tanks for transport. Good luck with your farm liability insurance if there’s ever a accident. 990 gal road vault tanks where about 9000$ last I knew. That’s cheap in my opinion to be legal and safe. Those totes aren’t meant to carry flammable liquids period.
 

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Ya. Except fuel is flammable and your knowingly using non approved tanks for transport. Good luck with your farm liability insurance if there’s ever a accident. 990 gal road vault tanks where about 9000$ last I knew. That’s cheap in my opinion to be legal and safe. Those totes aren’t meant to carry flammable liquids period.
Did you know that oilfield chemicals are flammable too. Some even explosive. Pretty much everything in the oil patch is a hydrocarbon so when I referred to oilfield chemicals I assume that most of that stuff is a combustible material. I called the Alberta information line and totes are perfectly fine to haul diesel around in highways as long as they are 31HA2 rated. There is a Un symbol that they will look for too. The totes are called IBC intermediate bulk container. I learned from the dangerous goods information people when I called them that the 31HA1 container that the glyfosate is shipped in is not the proper rating for diesel it is a rating only for peroxide chemicals only which was interesting.
So no insurance or dot issues if the container is rated 31HA2. In Alberta.
 

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Highmarker, do you recall what ag chemicals were originally in those totes which should give a guy a bit of a clue as to which totes would be the ones to be on the lookout for. Also are the totes you are using, do they have the steel cage around them or are they basic plastic units.
 

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Highmarker, do you recall what ag chemicals were originally in those totes which should give a guy a bit of a clue as to which totes would be the ones to be on the lookout for. Also are the totes you are using, do they have the steel cage around them or are they basic plastic units.
Most of the empty totes we have are from smoke or clearout 41. Both glyfosate and have the 31HA1 on them so I’m going to get some of the 31HA2 totes from a friend that works for a oilfield Chemical company.


The following table outlines the sequence of numbers and letters used to describe a UN IBC.

11 — rigid, designed for solids, loaded or unloaded by gravity

21 — rigid, designed for solids, loaded or unloaded under pressure > 10 kPa

13 — flexible, designed for solids, loaded or unloaded by gravity

31 — rigid, designed for liquids, loaded or unloaded by gravity
A — steel

B — aluminum

C — natural wood

D — plywood

F — reconstituted wood

G — fibreboard

H — plastic or rubber

L — textile

M — paper

N — metal other than steel or aluminum
1 — rigid inner receptacle (Composite IBC only)

2 — flexible inner receptacle (Composite IBC only)
 
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