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I have thought about door widths as well. For us we can’t move headers around over 20’ because of roads. I was thinking a 25-30 ft would be a decent size
 

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When we designed our shop (yet to be actually proved), we decided against bifold doors. Instead we did a 40' opening, with two conventional overhead doors. One is 26' and the other is 14', with a move-able post. So most of the time the 26' is plenty for moving machines in and out. The 14' is perfect for trucks and other vehicles. And in the rare times when we need to get a header in, we can get most of the full 40'. I think this is a good compromise for us. We debated on whether to just do two 20' doors instead of the 26/14 split. But I think it will work out okay. Time will tell.
 

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Discussion Starter #84
White Owl the mess you mounted is that on the inside of the wall of the shop? Has anyone fabricated a Jib crane or know of on that is reasonably priced that is for sale?
 

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Discussion Starter #85 (Edited)
For guys that have heated their shops with boilers how many btu would a guy need for a well insulated 8000 sq ft building? I was wondering if I could possibly run a line from my 150,000 btu house boiler underground that does not get used much for the house to heat the shop. I was wondering if the boiler could keep the shop at 5-10 deg c and we could have some radiant tube heaters to supplement the heat if needed when we are working in there. The shop would be about a 120 feet from the house. Our house is heated mostly by our wood fireplace. If you run a heat line underground to another building how did you insulated the lines and what size of line did you use?
 

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If it’s insulated good it should work, recovery time would be a bit slower when opening a big door. Our 6400 square foot shop has a 200,000 btu boiler and on the coldest days it might be on 25% of the time.

If I was doing it over again I would put 80-100 boiler in.
 

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Discussion Starter #90
For the boilers in your shop are you running several pumps and manifolds or one pump and manifold to do the whole shop[? Do you know what size of lines you put in the floor? We used 1/2 inch if I remember right for our basement and garage floor. If a guy goes to a bigger diameter pipe you can have longer runs. The only time our boiler draws some higher btu is when the their is big demand for hot water at the house.
 

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My 60X100 shop has 15 loops of 5/8 inch lines on two manifolds. There is up to a 30 degree F (17 C) temperature difference between the fluid going into the floor and the fluid returning from the floor. The thermostat is set at 57 degrees F (14 C), the floor temperature is around 60 degrees F (depends where you take a temperature reading) at this setting.
 

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Discussion Starter #94
I have seen guys use larger diameter line and I am not sure if it is 5/8 or 3/4. It allows you to run a lot longer loops because there is a lot more flow down each line. Skfarmboy do you see much difference in temperature in different parts of your floor and how much space is there between loops?
 

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The loops don't need to be long. The long loops don't save money all that much because the the longer the loop the more temp variant from water going in and out. You just need 2 headers (feed and return) with more ports. 300 ft of line is likely the most I would ever do. The key to keeping even floor heat is placement of your lines. Don't just put one loop entirely in one area. Instead if you are trying to keep a 1 foot spread between lines place one loop 2 ft apart in a clockwise direction from the feed to return and then the next loop counter clockwise from feed to return in between giving you a 1 ft separation. This does 2 things. 1 is if you ever should have a line rupture that area of the floor will still have heat flowing there. 2 is that the return from your first clockwise loop already has 17c colder water at the manifold. So by running your feed on the second one in reverse between the first grid you are balancing your heat distribution.
 

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Discussion Starter #96
Thanks for your info Doorkiller. When you put heat pipe underground from your outdoor boiler to the different buildings how do you insulate the pipes, what diameter of pipe do you use, how deep do you put the pipe, and does the pump at the boiler that sends the liquid down the pipe also pump it through the manifolds?
 

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We got ours at heat innovations in winkler Manitoba. Give them a call. They have good info on running pipe from building to building
 

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When running underground pipe make sure the two pipes are separated in the big outside pipe. Cheaper lines are just bundled together so you don’t get as warm of water coming in. On in floor loops it is best to route your lines so your hot water going out goes in different directions to help balance everything out
 

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Discussion Starter #99
I was in a shop yesterday and they had 24ft wide doors. I was quite impressed with this because you can pull two trucks or semis in side by side through the one door. I thought if I was going to have A 20-21ft door why not make it a little wider so you can easily pull in a tractor with tripples or two trucks side by side. I have also been looking into cranes and a guy can mount a overhead crane off of steel or wood trusses that are designed properly. I will likely be installing a jig crane that is around 25 ft long by one of the overhead doors so it has a 270 degree swing and can swing outside the shop through a 26 foot wide door and over the work bench on the shop wall. We are currently working through the jib crane design. Jib cranes seem a lot less expensive and easier to put in.

Has anyone put a fan on top of a end wall to exhaust smoke out of a building?
Are there any overhead doors that are stiffer and seal better when the wind is pushing on them?
 

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I would go a bit bigger doors if possible.
I have a 32 foot over head door on one end. We can roll in 2 super b's and still have room to get a truck in and out along the side.
30' overhead door on the side of the shop. 2 pickup trucks and a front end loader tractor sit there most of the winter. It is nice not having to back stuff out when you want to move out.
Haven't needed doors wider, but glad I have the size that I do.
Combines can't roll in the yard with 45' heads on them anyways, so no need to roll them hooked up into the shop.
We have rolled headers into the side door couple times then hooked combine up to it to work on.
 
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