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Hey I am thinking of retiring my 79 modle L2 and have been looking at a 1989 modle tr 96 with the ford engine. The combine looks good for its age and hours (4400). Can anyone give me clues as to what to look for on the tr96 and what can I can expect for a difference in changing from the L2 to the tr combine. Any info would be greatly appreciated.
cbcguy
 

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one of the first things that come to mind is the bubble up auger and gearbox. I had a tr96 with about 2500 hours and I changes two in the time I had it. A 4400 hour tr96 could/will be a money pit. Do not over pay they are selling at auctions for less than 10 thousand for a lot lower hours.

Did the seller provide you with a list of any major work done to the combine recently.

Definatly stay away from the tr96 models that had the cat engine (3208)
 

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Look at the chopper, if it's the original check the bearings, the housing might be cracked, as well as the side paneling above the sieve's, from the chopper vibrating. We replaced our's with a Redekop chopper, best thing we ever did. 4400 hours does sound like alot (ours is like woody's about 2500hrs) so the price should be fairly low. I would think with that many hours there would be some amount of work done to it.

Run the machine full throttle with the thrasher engaged to feel if there's a vibration or fairly smooth. If vibrating, the rotor's will probably need new rub bars and to be balanced. Take the side covers off the check the rub bars etc...

We also had to replace the bubble up auger and gearbox. The problem on ours was that the original owner never greased the zerk inside the gearbox. Anyway, it has been a great combine for us, still going strong.
 

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We had what I believe was the last year for the TR 95 and although not the same it did share a fair amount with the TR 96.

The bubble up auger drive spline wear was one issue and had that pointed out before we had it stop turning on us and seemed to be an every 1000 hour repair job where the auger was pulled and had a machine shop replace the spline insert in the bottom of it, then the angle drive gear box pulled apart and re-bearinged/resealed at the time of replacing the shaft with the mating splines to the auger. We never even began to wear out a bubble up auger as it was thickly coated on the outside edge with hard surfacing from the factory { replace the top auger bearing at that time too }

Also had engine fan hub bearing wear and that pulled and re-bearinged and the tensioner pulley bearing for the fan seemed to be a sore spot but I can't say if these were changed in the TR 96 model.

Along in its life we put on a Redekop chopper to better chop and also spread the chaff so we never encountered any bearing or vibration issues due to less life span on each unit. The Redekop was a great unit for sure, extremely easy to change over to drop straw, assuming it could be baled after !.

On the TR 95, the double sprocket on the end of the hex shaft for the stone roll was a horrible design and would wear out the shaft and itself and wobble so we had to resort to welding it in place onto the shaft of all things !, again may be different from the newer model as this used 50 chain to drive and had to be replaced once a season or at less then 200 hours, the 96 had 60 chain so was different there.

The idler tension pulley for the main drive off the engine, replacing the bearings in that unit every 1200 hours it was said.

The rotors, should I get started there ? LOL. Lets just say rocks are the enemy of a TR in that vintage and we even had a rock break off a platform auger finger and it was the finger that went through the combine and bent a bar in the concave but even worse, dented into the rotor and sheered off the leading plate at one rasp bar mounting assembly so rotors had to be pulled and had them balanced and bars replaced, the elephant ears on the front augers along with the other wear/serrated plates all replaced a few times, front rotor bearings, rear rotor bushings, gear boxes pulled to tear down to replace the coupler sprockets and same done on the rear of rotor, then H frame { the whole assembly that holds the concaves in place } pin wear or in one case an H frame concave pin broke its weld and fell out so everything had to be pulled to get it out and a new one machined and welded in. Concaves wearing and needing replacement ... then maybe another little rock going through and oh oh, out of balance again !. Hmmm, maybe the TR 96 had a better rock prevention system but someone else would have to speak up on that. After that finger breaking off we went so far as to make up fingers out of 4140 and as always made sure the slip clutch for the platform auger was set light enough that it would slip and avoid damage to the auger if a large rock "jumped" into the platform auger.

I could go on and on with wear that any combine will have, sprockets and the feeder house chain they drive, both clean grain and return elevators sprockets and chains etc etc.

The TR could do a better job in just about everything then the conventional JD 9600, less crop loss and less seed damage, great for malt barley and so on but horrible in tough straw conditions and had to park it when neighbors were still out in their fields grinding away in the night getting their crops off. Its a good fair weather combine where NO rocks exist is what we came to the conclusion of.
 

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Well Northern Farmer, all I have are rocks. I don't have one piece of ground that isn't rocky and we've had tr85's, right upto now the 96 and 99. I am not sure if the rock trap is better or different from the 95 to the 96. The last few years we have rolled everything and man what a nice ride it is for spraying, swathing, harvesting etc... Anyway, the TR's have been good to us, the 96 hasn't given us to many problems, I can honestly say it has been quite a good machine, knock on wood!
 

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Basicly the older cat had the wider feeder and the overlapping rotors, the ford also had the solid body rotors. At that hours my concern would be thin tin. Love the trs but high hour machines dont sell for much, one here sold for 11000 with 2600 engine hours.
 

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Coolio, rolling the fields certainly does help as would a seeding tool that buries rocks vs rolling them out on top but rolling some crops just isn't an option, especially on ground that bakes easily and then it can change the seeding depth too. It never failed, we always had some downed crop and having to cut low or use lifters and then the TR was just way too vulnerable to scooping up a rock and causing damage with only a little rock that made its way past the stone roll and we had it set at the midway point as a balance of getting any crop through the throat and trying to have some rock protection. One time we had a flat on the pickup header while harvesting canola swathes and it was at night and the person operating it didn't clue in for a while and there you go, the fingers managed to dig out a smaller rock and through it went and so went the rotor balance with it !. Also had rocks come in with a swath that was compromised with rocks in it from having to swath too low.

I'm not sure if all the TR's were set up the same but I know our concaves had the wires very close together, far closer then the conventional JD and that meant pulling every other wire out of the concave just to do peas as otherwise the concave not letting them through would hammer the you know what out of the peas and a cracked up sample is just a pile of dockage. Its not a fun job trying to put them back in as the peas would get jambed into the holes the wires had been sitting in. In the TR 95, there was no way to get the concaves out without taking the feeder off, then going through a bunch of work to pull the lower half of the cone assembly off.

If it wasn't for the danger of rocks, we liked the job the TR did although like I mentioned before, a fall on your face machine when the straw conditions were tough and its hard to see the neighbors around getting their crop off and winter is closing in fast.
 

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We had what I believe was the last year for the TR 95 and although not the same it did share a fair amount with the TR 96.

The bubble up auger drive spline wear was one issue and had that pointed out before we had it stop turning on us and seemed to be an every 1000 hour repair job where the auger was pulled and had a machine shop replace the spline insert in the bottom of it, then the angle drive gear box pulled apart and re-bearinged/resealed at the time of replacing the shaft with the mating splines to the auger. We never even began to wear out a bubble up auger as it was thickly coated on the outside edge with hard surfacing from the factory { replace the top auger bearing at that time too }

Also had engine fan hub bearing wear and that pulled and re-bearinged and the tensioner pulley bearing for the fan seemed to be a sore spot but I can't say if these were changed in the TR 96 model.

Along in its life we put on a Redekop chopper to better chop and also spread the chaff so we never encountered any bearing or vibration issues due to less life span on each unit. The Redekop was a great unit for sure, extremely easy to change over to drop straw, assuming it could be baled after !.

On the TR 95, the double sprocket on the end of the hex shaft for the stone roll was a horrible design and would wear out the shaft and itself and wobble so we had to resort to welding it in place onto the shaft of all things !, again may be different from the newer model as this used 50 chain to drive and had to be replaced once a season or at less then 200 hours, the 96 had 60 chain so was different there.

The idler tension pulley for the main drive off the engine, replacing the bearings in that unit every 1200 hours it was said.

The rotors, should I get started there ? LOL. Lets just say rocks are the enemy of a TR in that vintage and we even had a rock break off a platform auger finger and it was the finger that went through the combine and bent a bar in the concave but even worse, dented into the rotor and sheered off the leading plate at one rasp bar mounting assembly so rotors had to be pulled and had them balanced and bars replaced, the elephant ears on the front augers along with the other wear/serrated plates all replaced a few times, front rotor bearings, rear rotor bushings, gear boxes pulled to tear down to replace the coupler sprockets and same done on the rear of rotor, then H frame { the whole assembly that holds the concaves in place } pin wear or in one case an H frame concave pin broke its weld and fell out so everything had to be pulled to get it out and a new one machined and welded in. Concaves wearing and needing replacement ... then maybe another little rock going through and oh oh, out of balance again !. Hmmm, maybe the TR 96 had a better rock prevention system but someone else would have to speak up on that. After that finger breaking off we went so far as to make up fingers out of 4140 and as always made sure the slip clutch for the platform auger was set light enough that it would slip and avoid damage to the auger if a large rock "jumped" into the platform auger.

I could go on and on with wear that any combine will have, sprockets and the feeder house chain they drive, both clean grain and return elevators sprockets and chains etc etc.

The TR could do a better job in just about everything then the conventional JD 9600, less crop loss and less seed damage, great for malt barley and so on but horrible in tough straw conditions and had to park it when neighbors were still out in their fields grinding away in the night getting their crops off. Its a good fair weather combine where NO rocks exist is what we came to the conclusion of.
How did you get the H frame out ? From the front or the back ? In your tr
 

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We had what I believe was the last year for the TR 95 and although not the same it did share a fair amount with the TR 96.

The bubble up auger drive spline wear was one issue and had that pointed out before we had it stop turning on us and seemed to be an every 1000 hour repair job where the auger was pulled and had a machine shop replace the spline insert in the bottom of it, then the angle drive gear box pulled apart and re-bearinged/resealed at the time of replacing the shaft with the mating splines to the auger. We never even began to wear out a bubble up auger as it was thickly coated on the outside edge with hard surfacing from the factory { replace the top auger bearing at that time too }

Also had engine fan hub bearing wear and that pulled and re-bearinged and the tensioner pulley bearing for the fan seemed to be a sore spot but I can't say if these were changed in the TR 96 model.

Along in its life we put on a Redekop chopper to better chop and also spread the chaff so we never encountered any bearing or vibration issues due to less life span on each unit. The Redekop was a great unit for sure, extremely easy to change over to drop straw, assuming it could be baled after !.

On the TR 95, the double sprocket on the end of the hex shaft for the stone roll was a horrible design and would wear out the shaft and itself and wobble so we had to resort to welding it in place onto the shaft of all things !, again may be different from the newer model as this used 50 chain to drive and had to be replaced once a season or at less then 200 hours, the 96 had 60 chain so was different there.

The idler tension pulley for the main drive off the engine, replacing the bearings in that unit every 1200 hours it was said.

The rotors, should I get started there ? LOL. Lets just say rocks are the enemy of a TR in that vintage and we even had a rock break off a platform auger finger and it was the finger that went through the combine and bent a bar in the concave but even worse, dented into the rotor and sheered off the leading plate at one rasp bar mounting assembly so rotors had to be pulled and had them balanced and bars replaced, the elephant ears on the front augers along with the other wear/serrated plates all replaced a few times, front rotor bearings, rear rotor bushings, gear boxes pulled to tear down to replace the coupler sprockets and same done on the rear of rotor, then H frame { the whole assembly that holds the concaves in place } pin wear or in one case an H frame concave pin broke its weld and fell out so everything had to be pulled to get it out and a new one machined and welded in. Concaves wearing and needing replacement ... then maybe another little rock going through and oh oh, out of balance again !. Hmmm, maybe the TR 96 had a better rock prevention system but someone else would have to speak up on that. After that finger breaking off we went so far as to make up fingers out of 4140 and as always made sure the slip clutch for the platform auger was set light enough that it would slip and avoid damage to the auger if a large rock "jumped" into the platform auger.

I could go on and on with wear that any combine will have, sprockets and the feeder house chain they drive, both clean grain and return elevators sprockets and chains etc etc.

The TR could do a better job in just about everything then the conventional JD 9600, less crop loss and less seed damage, great for malt barley and so on but horrible in tough straw conditions and had to park it when neighbors were still out in their fields grinding away in the night getting their crops off. Its a good fair weather combine where NO rocks exist is what we came to the conclusion of.
How did you get the H frame out ? From the front or the back ?
Thank you, we have a tr98 with a bent h frame
 

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Its been so many years ago now that I honestly don't recall all the items I had to take apart but without a doubt it came out the front, certainly not out the back. Of course a TR 98 is a different designed machine then the 95 but have zero experience with them so I am clueless as to how they are put together. I would think someone who has been around a New Holland shop for years would have a fairly good idea or would at least hope so and point you in the right direction. You also might be able to peek into a shop manual that a shop has in their possession.
 

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This is bringing back bad memories.
I tried to forget everything I ever knew about a TR combine.
I've had a few apart not many but saw enough of those things that if the H frame is bent it ate something other than crop.
I don't think I ever saw one that the H frame was damaged and it wasn't foreign object (rock) that went through.
So front off, rotors out on the floor, concaves next then you can get to the H frame. I believe they do come out the front.
If I recall correctly getting that frame out is fairly big job and the machine shop would straighten them out for us.
But then seems to me there was a bit of work getting that H frame all aligned in the machine.
In the shop 25 years ago this would be a $20k to $30k work order usually.
 

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This is bringing back bad memories.
I tried to forget everything I ever knew about a TR combine.
I've had a few apart not many but saw enough of those things that if the H frame is bent it ate something other than crop.
I don't think I ever saw one that the H frame was damaged and it wasn't foreign object (rock) that went through.
So front off, rotors out on the floor, concaves next then you can get to the H frame. I believe they do come out the front.
If I recall correctly getting that frame out is fairly big job and the machine shop would straighten them out for us.
But then seems to me there was a bit of work getting that H frame all aligned in the machine.
In the shop 25 years ago this would be a $20k to $30k work order usually.
Once straightened up, did they bend back down easily:( if it took a bunch of green crop in or were they strong like a new one ?
 

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Well not sure, don't remember any coming back but this is like 25 years ago.
Found this thread here ABuck said its thin wall high tensile. If that is true once high tensile steel is bent it won't be as strong after.
Put a new one in then.
 
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