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From what I remember New Holland actually came out with their twin-rotor before IH did. I thought some of the IH engineers grew tired of all the development time IH was putting in to the project and joined NH.

Wasn't the angle that the IH rotor runs at one of their biggest patents? And that is what slowed down JD for so many years?

As for your original question, I was thru the plant when it was in the Quad-Cities and I met a few of the engineers but I can't remember any one name mentioned as THE inventor.
 

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Not sure it was one name in particular. I saw a video celebrating the 30th anniversary and they had a segment with some of the engineering team responsible and there were about 14 or more responsible.
I toured the Quad Cities plant a number of years ago and a fellow, his first name was Cam (can't remember his last name) was my tour guide and he was one of the individuals involved with the axial flow development. He was in the video as well. Maybe someone on here knows who I am talking about?
 

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The gentleman you are referring to is Camiel Beert and he was one of the first group of men to design the axial flow. He is semi-retired and still travels the custom harvesting pro harvest run when time allows him to. He is one of the best!!!
 

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Seems to me I read in one of my IH history books that the twin rotor was originally designed while the designer worked for IH. IH took little interest in it and he took it to NH. Then IH got interested in the one rotor axial. Main problem was the transfer of crop from the feeder to the rotor. Early prototypes had the feeder above the rotor feeding down.
I remember on of the brothers who owned the IH dealer here told me IH won a lawsuit on who had the original concept.
 

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Anyone remember the "Bi-Rotor"? I think thats what they called it. It was the one where the inventor took a regular A/F and made the threashing cage revole in opposite direction around the spinning rotor. What ever became of that?
 

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That can of worms is opened on the John Deere page of this forum when everybody gets bored talking about when JD is going to come out with a new combine. Yup, JD has the rights to it and they have it tucked away. And actually I believe both rotors spin in the same direction.
 

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I was told that the first IH rotor was stuffed in a 915. IH would let farmers run the machine to see how they liked it but would never let them look under the sheet metal. Anyone else ever heard this?
 

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The first rotor was in a 503 International hydro model. This was told to me by Cam himself. He was one of the first engineers that was involved with the development of the axial flow combine.
 

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Quote:The gentleman you are referring to is Camiel Beert and he was one of the first group of men to design the axial flow. He is semi-retired and still travels the custom harvesting pro harvest run when time allows him to. He is one of the best!!!

That's the man, Thank You Redfever.
 

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Quote:The first rotor was in a 503 International hydro model. This was told to me by Cam himself. He was one of the first engineers that was involved with the development of the axial flow combine.
This makes sense.In the very latest Case-IH Axial-Flow Combines brochure,on pg. 17,this line caught my attention-"We pioneered rotor development back in the 1960's." So...they were already developing it back then with "503" skin around it.
But the origins of rotary threshing may have started even earlier with.....rotary corn shellers.

We have a book "150 years of International Harvester" by C.H.Wendel-1st pub'd in 1981.On pg. 78 he talks of IH's 1904 purchase of the Keystone Co. They made 2 types of shellers-"Spring" and "Cylinder".I'll quote the paragraph on "Cylinders":

"Cylinder shellers are radically different than spring shellers.Generally,the device consists of a stationary cage,made of heavy iron bars.Within this cage revolves a main shaft to which are secured a series of shelling rings.The action of these rings revolving the ear corn within the cage shells the kernals off the cob."

Does this concept sound familiar? While they didn't call it rotary,it sure sounds like a rotary design and there are many older farmers,my Dad and Uncle-80 & 82 yr.s respectively,included,who will tell you this was rotary threshing's start.


On pg. 81 the author has a pic of the No. 1 cylinder corn sheller intro'd in 1919.This was an engine or tractor driven unit with a capacity of 300 bph,far greater than any spring unit of the day. IH built shellers until 1964. I remember going to a farm machinery auction back in the early '80's and seeing a IH rotary sheller on top of a scrap heap.Dad knew what it was and what a shame that it ended up there!!!!!

Deere also built rotary shellers back in the '30's? thru ? I don't have a Deere book so don't quote or vilify me for what I've said. I have seen pics of a #30 JD sheller but have no info. Perhaps someone with a JD history book could tell us more?


I also forgot to mention Minneapolis Moline also built a rotary corn sheller.There are a lot of these around but little info to be found online about these either.
 

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I have the product history book it shows a pict of the 403 with the rotor in it. it came from a 24X corn picker, a cage sheller. Cam was the best, he gave his blessing to the 8010 the last I talked to him. took me on a tour in east moline once had some great stories.
 

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FT
did Cam ever mention his wifes name? When did White (or Massey) come out with a rotor, I bet redhat knows the year!
 

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Its Cam and Mercedes Beert. We have always called them Mr and Mrs Case IH. They are truly great individuals and have been terrific spokespeople for the harvesting industry and farming in general.

Here is a link to an article on the US Custom Harvesters website http://uschi.com/fame-beert.php

JHarvest
 

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Jharvest,
I did get to meet him a Louisville show, And he told me his wife's name. Very nice gentlemen. We talked about combines of coarse, and about the business side of R&D .He left me with the impression that he tells it like it is.
 
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