The Combine Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey I have a 30.5 32 tire tube that has small leak which lasts about a month after I fill it up. I am toying with the idea of using tire slime because I dont want to spend the money on a new tube. I have heard of using a gallon of anti freeze for a small leak. I have also heard of anti freeze mixed with shredded newspaper. Has anyone ever done this? Im sure a couple gallons of slime would work but im trying to get by cheap. I personally think the antifreeze and shredded newspaper would work. Any ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
I have heard that latex paint will work in a pinch for pinhole leaks.

Take the core out and run some latex paint through the valve stem.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,613 Posts
A gallon of antifreeze costs how much? A patch costs how much? What does a tube cost? I agree 100%, just fix the thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,603 Posts
I have heard bicyclists use a mixture of 1/2 antifreeze and 1/2 latex paint. I have used straight antifreeze with some success. Stop leak concoctions seem to work better in tubeless tires. There is not much distance for the plug to work with a tube.

Do all you guys do your own tires? Here its $250 to get a guy to come out and fix a tire.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,613 Posts
$250 to fix a tire? I just paid $75 for a high wheel sprayer tire to be patched. I can't do that one without a bead breaker. I would wreck the tire trying. Why not just buy a bottle of slim at the very least?
It is a $2000-$2500 tire new? Why risk it there is something stuck in it that can do a lot more damage?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,233 Posts
$250 to fix a tire?
Thats just the charge for the service call in these parts and that is the small private shops, brand name ones even more. Then charges for mileage on top of that, and of course the charges to dismount and fix tire. For example last fall neighbor racked up a $750 bill just to have a boot put in a 23.1 30 on his combine from an antler puncture. Getting to the point of being cheaper to buy a new tire rather than have an old one repaired.

I have my own fluid pump and the rest of the tooling so unless I am in a hurry, I just do my own large tire repairs now. But if you don't know what you're doing, that can get expensive fast too from pinched tube and wrecked beads:eek:

But I concur, fix the dam tire properly and be done with it. That is a pricey tire to be taking chances with IMO. And I'll reserve comment on dumping crap inside a tire as some have suggested...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
If you don't want to repair your tire for fear of the cost......... The cheapest route is keep pumping it up monthly! If it were me I'd fix it! Just saying
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,024 Posts
The tire shop we use sells this pink tire sealant in a gallon jug. It seems to work well on tubeless tires. I think the stuff costs around $30 a jug and they will pump a jug of that into a 20.8 38 if the tire is old and leaky. It seems to work and cheaper than pulling and putting in a tube. However these are old tires that if they were pulled would probably be replaced. The stuff is great for implement tires with slow leaks and even atv tires that are a pain to keep air.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,973 Posts
Investing in a bead breaker and few tire tools is money well spent. We bought a bead breaker out of Texas that runs off an impact for about $400 that works awesome. The guy that builds and sells them is a metallurgist and knew the proper alloys and components to put into it so it lasts a long time. They also run a tire shop. Since we bought it I have done all my big tire work my self. I can now clean up the inside of the rims and repaint them if they are rusty if we are not pressed to get them back together right away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Investing in a bead breaker and few tire tools is money well spent. We bought a bead breaker out of Texas that runs off an impact for about $400 that works awesome. The guy that builds and sells them is a metallurgist and knew the proper alloys and components to put into it so it lasts a long time. They also run a tire shop. Since we bought it I have done all my big tire work my self. I can now clean up the inside of the rims and repaint them if they are rusty if we are not pressed to get them back together right away.
What about the homemade beadbreaker from Texas do you like? Price? Effectiveness in separating the tire bead? Did you save money overall since you do the work yourself now?
 
  • Like
Reactions: radar

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,539 Posts
I fix all my own tires, and they always have flats at the wrong time and place. I bought some slime for ATV tires that have slow leaks, and it worked so well that I now keep a good stock of is and use it in any tubeless tire, or else I make them tubeless. Just takes too much time to fix a tire when the sun is shining and there is work to be done.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,233 Posts
I have the Emco?? mechanical/manual one and its been good. Was around $150. Honestly haven't figured out why they say not use an impact gun on it, unless they figure guys will overload it. I have no issues when done with some common sense. Gotta keep them threads lubed up on any of that style.

As for the rest, have everything from the diaphragm pumps down to the Coats tire machine and large tire spreader which is the cats ass for boots or plugs in tires. My fav tire irons are the ones that come with my old Russian tractor lol, though must have a dozen other ones including those special ones for the lock rings on the old multi piece wheels. Been eyeing up that gizmo known as the Blue Cobra from Ken Tool, that thing is slick for tubeless truck tires. Seen some different offshore brands of it, not sure the quality is there though.

IMO, fixing tires is not for everyone. Requires patience and a strong back lol. And lots of inventory of tubes, patches, valve stems and more, and even then a guy don't always have what you need. Tubes just don't last anymore, have had so many rot and crack sitting on the shelf in the dark. Tractor tire tubes, I won't put anything in but Firestone. You get what you pay for. Those chinese tubes are f'n garbage IMO.

FYI I get all my tire repair supplies from B-Line out of St Albert. If I time it right, the salesman's truck will stop by and drop off my order when in the area about every three weeks as he is making his rounds of the area shops. Otherwise I just pick it up in person. Great guys and prices and well supplied!:)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
410 Posts
I bought one of those blue cobra tools, pretty pricey. All the incumbent tire guys just roll their eyes and swear all you need is two bars and some testosterone. I, personally, would like to keep my back functional. The blue cobra works well most of the time, but takes some getting used to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
931 Posts
Im thinking his slow leak is a bead leak so a patch wont help that. That's why hes saying he needs a tube. I would just bit the bullet and put a tube in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,773 Posts
I have sixteen 710/70 R 38s Titan/Goodyears that developed slow leaks and just couldn't get them to stop. Finally bought a barrel of Liquitube and eliminated that problem. LiquiTube Tire Sealant - Home

I think it was around 1600USD but so far I think it's worth every penny. Still patch truck and vehicle tires but use this for virtually every other leaking tire.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top