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Alternate Crop Use

The current dry conditions are of great concern to many grain and cattle producers in Manitoba. As the extreme heat and dry conditions persist, crops will continue to deteriorate.
The AgriInsurance program provides flexibility for producers to put their crop to alternate use during the growing season. Alternate use means a change to the use of a crop from what was originally intended when planting in the spring. For example, if you indicated on your Seeded Acreage Report that you were growing oats for grain but choose to cut it for greenfeed instead, this would be considered alternate use.
If you are considering putting your crop to an alternate use (silage, greenfeed, grazing) for your own use or someone else’s, here’s what you need to know from an insurance perspective.
  • Contact MASC immediately by phone or email. Please have the legal land descriptions and number of acres you plan to put to an alternate use available. It is ideal to have an adjustor appraise your crop prior to putting it to alternate use. However, if timing doesn’t allow for an adjustor to assess your crop prior to putting it to alternate use, producers must leave strips (one 10-foot-wide strip, the full length of the field for every 40 acres) so that the adjustor can accurately assess the crop at a later date.
  • The appraisal determined by the adjustor will be used to finalize the insurance claim and will be included when calculating your future coverage. For example, if the appraisal is 20 bushels per acre and you elect to cut it for feed, MASC will count these 20 bushels per acre as if it were harvested for grain. The proceeds from alternate use production (i.e. greenfeed or silage sales) are not part of your crop claim calculation. The assessment can also be helpful in determining the value of the crop if it will be used for an alternate use for your operation or to sell.
  • It is up to the producer to decide whether they want to harvest the crop or put it to alternate use. An appraisal must be completed prior to cutting or adequate strips left for appraisal at a later date to ensure a representative yield can be used for a claim calculation.
 

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Alternate Crop Use

The current dry conditions are of great concern to many grain and cattle producers in Manitoba. As the extreme heat and dry conditions persist, crops will continue to deteriorate.
The AgriInsurance program provides flexibility for producers to put their crop to alternate use during the growing season. Alternate use means a change to the use of a crop from what was originally intended when planting in the spring. For example, if you indicated on your Seeded Acreage Report that you were growing oats for grain but choose to cut it for greenfeed instead, this would be considered alternate use.
If you are considering putting your crop to an alternate use (silage, greenfeed, grazing) for your own use or someone else’s, here’s what you need to know from an insurance perspective.
  • Contact MASC immediately by phone or email. Please have the legal land descriptions and number of acres you plan to put to an alternate use available. It is ideal to have an adjustor appraise your crop prior to putting it to alternate use. However, if timing doesn’t allow for an adjustor to assess your crop prior to putting it to alternate use, producers must leave strips (one 10-foot-wide strip, the full length of the field for every 40 acres) so that the adjustor can accurately assess the crop at a later date.
  • The appraisal determined by the adjustor will be used to finalize the insurance claim and will be included when calculating your future coverage. For example, if the appraisal is 20 bushels per acre and you elect to cut it for feed, MASC will count these 20 bushels per acre as if it were harvested for grain. The proceeds from alternate use production (i.e. greenfeed or silage sales) are not part of your crop claim calculation. The assessment can also be helpful in determining the value of the crop if it will be used for an alternate use for your operation or to sell.
  • It is up to the producer to decide whether they want to harvest the crop or put it to alternate use. An appraisal must be completed prior to cutting or adequate strips left for appraisal at a later date to ensure a representative yield can be used for a claim calculation.
How has that changed anything? Those rules are the same for every year. What would help is upping the "no yield" amount so its actually economical for it to be fed to cows.
 

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Wow, the biggest increase in crop production in the last ten years is the CO2 in the atmosphere. Good post! the man sounds like a very technical common-sense guy.
 

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According to Dad he sort of remembers 1961 drought he was about 14 years old, he said wheat ran around 7 bu acre on summerfallow but he said grandpa cut and baled most of the crop to feed the cows.
I remember 1988 being dry and the crop wasn't great.
And 2002 we hauled water to the pasture but we had more quantity slough hay to bale.
This year seems the slough hay is non existent after so many wet years here there is no grass in them just cattails and thistles.
 

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A few years ago I read about research on CO2 concentrations and wheat productions. They did record a slight increase in wheat yields as they increased concentrations, but nutritional aspects declined. Protein levels, amino acids, vitamin content, etc, all declined somewhat. But as wheat is a cool-weather crop, hot weather will greatly curtail the yields that are possible with wheat, regardless of the other factors. Our three limiting facts on my farm are water, soil quality, and excessive soil temperature. These combine to limit what we can ever get . A wheat crop 75 to 80 bu/ac is pretty good here, even with irrigation and lots of inputs. Much of the reason for that is our hot soil temperatures mid summer. Nearly all of our crops on our farm are cool weather crops ideally.
 

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Almost done a field of peas. 15-17bph. Think it’s the best one we got. Worst case sonario. To good to write off. To poor to chase lol
 

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Almost done a field of peas. 15-17bph. Think it’s the best one we got. Worst case sonario. To good to write off. To poor to chase lol
Really?
Depending on pea price I’d say that is time well spent, not using much fuel and while likely cutting right on the ground I doubt mud sticking to cutterbar is a problem.
Count your blessings.
 

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Compared to last year's extraordinary high yeilds, that sounds bad and feels bad. But around here, 20 bpa is pretty much expected on continuously cropped dryland here for peas and wheat on average. We've had about 5 years of way above average yields.

A hutterite boss was complaining to my neighbor about how bad the crops are this year. My neighbor pushed him and said, "how bad? what is your estimated bpa?" He hummed and hawed and then finally said 25-30 bu/ac durum, which isn't too far off the average and at current prices dang good. The colonies have made a lot of money on average crops on dryland for many years. Kind of funny. They aren't going to be hurting too bad this year. Other farmers and ranchers are definitely feeling pain though.
 

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Really?
Depending on pea price I’d say that is time well spent, not using much fuel and while likely cutting right on the ground I doubt mud sticking to cutterbar is a problem.
Count your blessings.
What the **** is mud on the cutter bar? You might get hat once in 10 years out here

Peas were contacted before seeding. First 10 bu. Price was fair.
This is still a crop insurance claim
 

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Compared to last year's extraordinary high yeilds, that sounds bad and feels bad. But around here, 20 bph is pretty much expected on continuously cropped dryland here for peas and wheat on average. We've had about 5 years of way above average yields.

A hutterite boss was complaining to my neighbor about how bad the crops are this year. My neighbor pushed him and said, "how bad? what is your estimated bph?" He hummed and hawed and then finally said 25-30 bu/ac durum, which isn't too far off the average and at current prices dang good. The colonies have made a lot of money on average crops on dryland for many years. Kind of funny. They aren't going to be hurting too bad this year. Other farmers and ranchers are definitely feeling pain though.
Only saving grace is the price. 30bu durum crop on stubble is a very good crop for us
 

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What the **** is mud on the cutter bar? You might get hat once in 10 years out here

Peas were contacted before seeding. First 10 bu. Price was fair.
This is still a crop insurance claim
Your soil is likely sandier than some (not all) of our heavy clay soils here.
Friend and I discussing what would be the ultimate salt in the wound situation, turn wet just before having to harvest a cutterbar ground skidding crop.
And under those conditions clay sticks to components like baby **** to Velcro!
 

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Your soil is likely sandier than some (not all) of our heavy clay soils here.
Friend and I discussing what would be the ultimate salt in the wound situation, turn wet just before having to harvest a cutterbar ground skidding crop.
And under those conditions clay sticks to components like baby **** to Velcro!
lol remember Don your in gods country.
Ya that’s the biggest worry is our rain will show up when we’re trying to get a ****ty crop off.
Just looked at a later durum field we though looked pretty good. Nothing in the heads other then in the dips.
On the bright side less to combine hehe
 

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lol remember Don your in gods country.
Ya that’s the biggest worry is our rain will show up when we’re trying to get a ****ty crop off.
Just looked at a later durum field we though looked pretty good. Nothing in the heads other then in the dips.
On the bright side less to combine hehe
That’s exactly what happened in 2002 here. I remember thrashing canola end of November…
 
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