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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live in a semi-arid environment. We have terraces as well so I think a 12 row corn head is probably the max for us. Would be able to run a 40' draper or stripper head though.

With these header sizes and our yields I'm not sure we could keep even a 575R or 740TT full. If you're looking at auctions though, it seems like sometimes there are good deals on even larger machines such as 585R, 595R, 750TT or 760TT. If a guy were to buy one of those and then get into a poor yielding year where ground speed limitations put you at 700 bushels per hour in corn or 300 bushels per hour in wheat, would they still do OK?

On our average years I would expect 1800 bph in corn and 1300 bph in wheat on most of our ground because it's dryland. The irrigated ground would likely max the machine capacity out, but is a low percentage of our total acres.
 

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I think they do pretty good...better than a single rotary IMO. Going from wetland to dryland will surely take some fine tuning, but can be done within the cab and even have different settings saved on the monitor for various conditions. With the current machines, you can pick from narrow body, or wide body. Different hp and options available within, but 740 and 750 are narrow, 760 and up is wide IIRC.

I think if the feeding at the feeder house is somewhat even left to right, the machine will perform well. A rotary doesn't care how spread out the feeder chain delivers, but at various through-puts, the rotary changes how even the distribution is to the chaffer. I also believe threshing is done better on a cylinder machine at various through-puts, but like usual, high volumes is better.

I run a 740TT with 40' fd70 and 12 and 8 row corn head. Our yields vary like you are referring to. I wouldn't mind a wide body and more power ( I'm an American!) but am happy with its performance and loss levels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys. I appreciate the feedback. There are lots of S670's around here, a Case 9230, and gleaner S77's and I know none of them can be being kept full either when conditions are bad to average. It's just that I don't think I could keep a 760TT full even when conditions are excellent in our area. Sounds like it shouldn't be a huge issue though. I'll still be focusing on the class 7 machines but it a heck of a deal pops up on a larger one, I won't be afraid of it.
 

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Thanks guys. I appreciate the feedback. There are lots of S670's around here, a Case 9230, and gleaner S77's and I know none of them can be being kept full either when conditions are bad to average. It's just that I don't think I could keep a 760TT full even when conditions are excellent in our area. Sounds like it shouldn't be a huge issue though. I'll still be focusing on the class 7 machines but it a heck of a deal pops up on a larger one, I won't be afraid of it.
Where do you farm? Sounds kinda like here. 25 bu average spring wheat, 35-40 bu average winter wheat around here. Occasionally we will see 50-60, but only once every 15 yrs or so.
 

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What I liked about the lexion in 2011 was essentially all of their machines are capable of large, heavy headers (for thin crops would be a reason). Now, most all machines can handle a 40 ft grain table.
I went 40 because it can handle it, and poor turning on the headlands.
 

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I run a 590r in central Ks. Have harvested wheat, soybeans and milo, very good to very poor yields, in all crops. I've never really had problems in any crop. Losses from the machine are never an issue.
 
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