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Just like many others we're in an area where land is almost impossible to acquire unless you've got daddy's quota money. Unfortunately for us our immediate area is so choked full of livestock (us included) that any land that does come up get's bid up to insane prices. We currently run about 800ac all within a 4mi radius of the yard with most of it owned or within the family.

That brings me to the question of this thread, how far does it make sense to go for land? Talking to some neighbors who've gone out a bit further there seems to be some potential opportunities for good land about 25-30ish miles away for almost half of what the local going rate is. Those who have gone further out is it worth it? What are some considerations when farming land that far away? What are all the costs of transporting equipment/fuel/seed/chemical/etc back and forth? I'm just starting to gain some ownership of the farm and took on some decent debt with a major barn project so we're definitely not out knocking on doors, but if opportunities are coming up over the next few years we want to have thought things through so we know what we want to do ahead of time.
 

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If it was me I would be doing some land comparisons and taking a hard look at selling where you are and buying those twenty five miles away. It's not that the distance is prohibitive, but if the area compares at all you could buy say 75% more land and put the improvements you want on it. If you're dead set against relocating, twenty five miles isn't a horrible commute, the downside is you will break or wear out things you never dreamt of and you have to be more organized otherwise you will always feel like you are never where you should be.
 

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For a few years we were driving 160ish road miles to farm a 1,000 acre block until someone closer offered more money than it was worth to us to farm it but it's all about what you want need and can afford cows will be a bit easier than farm ground but are you willing to spend a hour of your day driving no matter how busy you are to go check cows or crops
 

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There are guys from my intermediate area that go to Texas to farm. They aren't the first from the area to try it and it managed to break the others so....

I've got an out laying 160 that's a short 15 miles away. That's far enough, things like to break away from home area, or a freak rain storm comes up. Can't get manure on it so cost of production is higher but it got bought right.
 

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We used to go 20 miles for a 375ac piece. It was pretty decent as it was right next to town, elevator and fert dealer less than 5 miles away. But it was on the north side and we were on the southwest side. As time went on, they took 80ac here and 100ac there for development, land switched hands, rent got too expensive, but by that time traffic was becoming a pain to move equipment there so we let it go. Also at that time a neighbor was cutting back and we picked up 2 qtrs closer to home. All things aside, if traffic and town wouldnt have grown and developed we probably would still be farming it.
 

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I tel myself if something comes for sale within 10 miles of main place I would look at it, but even 10 miles would be pushing it for me. 3 miles I would be more comfortable with and take more seriously. Go too far and you start having to look at trucking equipment and all the investment that that requires, or else just extra wear and tear, and it just isn’t worth it. For me.
 

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I tel myself if something comes for sale within 10 miles of main place I would look at it, but even 10 miles would be pushing it for me. 3 miles I would be more comfortable with and take more seriously. Go too far and you start having to look at trucking equipment and all the investment that that requires, or else just extra wear and tear, and it just isn’t worth it. For me.
So that kind of brings up a question, how much more is land worth next to home, or within say a 3-4 mile radius of home base as opposed to land that is farther out?

My situation is somewhat unique with manure availability I figure if its within three miles of my barns its easily worth $500/acre more than outlaying farms. That doesn't factor in bins/dryer rt home and other perks of operating close. I've wondered if $500/acre maybe on the low side even.
 

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We have around 350 acres that are 10-15 miles away from our home farm. I figure it's drought insurance. We don't cut the hay there quite as quickly as around home, so it never quite makes highest quality dairy feed. But it feeds dry cows and heifers quite well, or milk cows if things go sideways and everything gets more expensive in dry years. Which has been the last 2.5-3 years running now, so as much as it's a bit of a pain, I'm still glad we have it. I fully admit, it's all rented and pretty cheap. If we had to buy it or pay more for rent, it might be a different scenario.
 

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We’re about 35 miles end to end as well. All kinds of opportunities have come up with a larger scope. Next to nothing in a tight radius where I grew up.
 

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Used to farm 480 acres 11 miles from home on the other side of the Trans Canada hwy. After a couple of close calls on the highway I sold it and was lucky to pick up some close to home.
If traffic and bridges weren't a concern I would likely still be farming that land but it definitely takes more time to farm away from home. Land in the immediate vicinity of home is definitely worth quite a bit more per acre.
 

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Just like many others we're in an area where land is almost impossible to acquire unless you've got daddy's quota money. Unfortunately for us our immediate area is so choked full of livestock (us included) that any land that does come up get's bid up to insane prices. We currently run about 800ac all within a 4mi radius of the yard with most of it owned or within the family.

That brings me to the question of this thread, how far does it make sense to go for land? Talking to some neighbors who've gone out a bit further there seems to be some potential opportunities for good land about 25-30ish miles away for almost half of what the local going rate is. Those who have gone further out is it worth it? What are some considerations when farming land that far away? What are all the costs of transporting equipment/fuel/seed/chemical/etc back and forth? I'm just starting to gain some ownership of the farm and took on some decent debt with a major barn project so we're definitely not out knocking on doors, but if opportunities are coming up over the next few years we want to have thought things through so we know what we want to do ahead of time.
I currently deal with about a 30 mile spread mostly North and South. I don't mind it. When rain showers are really spotty you can be productive on some land while the other land is drying out. I usually plan it out where if I'm at my far away land that I seed it all in one shot. The more diverse your crop rotation is the more of a pain it can be. I know tender trailers for seeding are expensive compared to a grain trucks, but if you can minimize the total # of vehicles you need at the field it saves a bunch of stress and time. If you are at the point where you have to transport combines, sprayers, and tractors with a trailer then to me it better be one **** of a deal. I don't know how your licensing fees are for old rust bucket pickups, but we have a few old fords that I don't care if they sit in a field for a week till we have time to get them. If anybody tries to steal them then the joke is on them.

On another note, Don't ever bring up "daddy's money" in your local town/neighborhood. Nothing positive ever really comes out of it. Some people are dealt with a better set of cards then others.... That's life. The good landlords know the difference.
 

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I am of the opinion, possibly wrong, that all the known factors are already priced into land prices. Which is to say, that there really are no bargains in one area vs. another. There is always a reason why one area is higher or lower than another. Even if that reason has nothing to do with farming, such as development potential( which might be wildly profitable in the long haul, but won't make any payments in the interim), or recreational potential/view/resources etc.

Climate/Weather/hail, yields, proximity to markets and services, accessibility, topography, soils, rocks, water table, manure access etc. are already priced in, and cheaper is cheaper for a reason. Which doesn't help at all if nothing is for sale in your immediate area of course.
 

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We have 20% of our land 15 miles away. Not far, but sometimes it feels like it. Like when you're down there and get stuck and have to wait an hour or two for a 4wd to come pull you out, if there's even someone available.

You never have the tools you need. Moving all the harvest equipment is half a day each way. But at least when we're there, we try to do it all. Seeding for sure.

In my mind, a fully stocked crew cab service truck would be the first thing if we went farther. A seeding tender is top of my wishlist. We use liquid, so seed, liquid and fuel on one trailer would save the tender driver, me, a lot of trips.

Harvest is rough, especially if you get a rain shower. But it's good for rain/drought risk too. And it's only 15 miles.
 

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My farm is spread out 30 miles in two different directions. Not that big a deal really. You just get more efficient and seed one crop at each farm to cut down moving times. Sometimes its a benefit to spread your weather risk. And theres always the potential to pick something up inbetween
 

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If we moved from our most northern field to our most southern, it’d be a 71 mile move. That would never happen of course, because there are lots of fields in between and you plan accordingly. I sure wish everything was in a 10 mile radius but just not reality where the Hutts have surrounded the home farm on all four sides.
 
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