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Ive been cutting wheat this past week in West Texas with my dad on our farm. We run a JD 7720 Turbo with a 230 header. The dryland wheat is averaging about 50 bu/ac. I've been driving around 3.0 to 3.5 mph. I was wondering how fast you guys with the 9000 series combines can run with 30 ft head in 50 bu/ac wheat.
 

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5.3-5.9...or according to our dealer you can put the lever all the way foward...thats a little extreme for me though
 

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All depends on how much of the wheat you want in the tank or if you want to reseed by combine. LOL
 

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I run a 9750 in 90-110 bu wheat @ 3.5-4 mph. I usually don't go much faster than this because as Harsh says, it usually puts more out the back. I've seen some custom harvesters go 5-6 mph and when the volunteer starts growing again u can see a real difference. Anyways, I know this doesn't give u an answer, but it can kinda give u an idea.
 

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You guys are making me want to harvest wheat SO bad....but mine is just not quite ready, yet. I do not know what our wheat is going to yield, but "the straw" is surely there! Freeze damage was hit and miss in our neck of the woods...mostly miss, I would guess. If I had to guess-timate how much our wheat will average, I would say about 60-65 bpa (100% dryland). There are more heads than not with 4 grains per mesh; but then on the other hand, there are a few small grains in some of those same heads.

I am like the most of you here...I want to have the grain in the bin, NOT on the ground! Pulling back on that orange lever is the best way to prevent volunteer wheat.

One time, I was cutting with this old man, and we stopped our machines to look for carry-over/throwing wheat out the back end. He contended that if he could put his [big] hand on the ground, and within that hand print find only 5 grains of wheat, he thought he was doing a "more than swell" job of harvesting. I have never really stopped and thought that "formula" through all the way, but my gut instinct tells me that would equate to quite a bit of carry-over by the time it's all said and done..

I sew a wheat called Cutter, and also some Scout. Both of these varieties thresh very easily. By the time they are mature, screaming really loud might do a little threshing, inofitself. Seems like 4.0-4.5 mph was the ground speed I remember in 50-60 bpa wheat (that was with my 930R platform). I'll admit that I am a little bt anal, though, when it comes to combining correctly. I have a real problem blowing through a crop that took the better part of a year to mature/produce...a good yield (50 bpa +) and a good price ($5.65 last time I checked) makes it even harder to close your eyes & mind and push the orange lever forward!
 

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I think it's something like 11 kernels per sq ft to equal 1 bu/ac loss rate.
Also, ALWAYS check your ground in front of the combine, especially with so much inclimate weather and your easy-threshing varieties. Many times, the combines/operators get blamed for something they simply had NOTHING to do with!

Easy to thresh=higher shatter loss.
 

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The amount of kernels per square foot varies with the width of the header and the width of the spread of the chaff.

I think the formula for wheat is this:

1,000,000 kernels per bushel (if memory serves me correctly) divided by 43,560 square feet per acre = 23 kernels per square foot if spread the entire width of the header, or if checking pre-harvest or header loss. (1 bu per acre loss).

If the chaff is not spread the width of the header then you take the width of the header divided by the width of the spread of the chaff i.e. 30 foot head divided by 6 foot sieve width (with no chaff spreader) = 5.

Take 23 kernels per square foot times 5 = 115 kernels per square foot to equal 1 bu per acre of combine loss in that example. This is due to the fact that you are concentrating the loss from a 30 foot swath into 6 foot strips.

The formula is the same for other crops, you just have to know the average amount of seeds per bushel, everything else is the same.

Hope this helps
 

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Quote:The amount of kernels per square foot varies with the width of the header and the width of the spread of the chaff.

I think the formula for wheat is this:

1,000,000 kernels per bushel (if memory serves me correctly) divided by 43,560 square feet per acre = 23 kernels per square foot if spread the entire width of the header, or if checking pre-harvest or header loss. (1 bu per acre loss).

If the chaff is not spread the width of the header then you take the width of the header divided by the width of the spread of the chaff i.e. 30 foot head divided by 6 foot sieve width (with no chaff spreader) = 5.

Take 23 kernels per square foot times 5 = 115 kernels per square foot to equal 1 bu per acre of combine loss in that example. This is due to the fact that you are concentrating the loss from a 30 foot swath into 6 foot strips.

The formula is the same for other crops, you just have to know the average amount of seeds per bushel, everything else is the same.

Hope this helps


1,000,000 seeds / bu. might not work so well because there are small, medium and large grain wheat and barley varieties. 23 kernals per sq. ft. isn't so bad with a 30 - 36' header and the chopper and chaff spreader off. with chopper and chaff spreader off, a bushel / acre loss can vary from 70 - 100 kernels / sq. ft.
 
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