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How long do spray nozzles last? How do you tell if they're worn? This is my third season on a new-to-me sprayer and am wondering when I start considering replacing nozzles.
 

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Take them to your local dealer and have them tested, they should have a machine or they will point you in the right direction to someone who does.
 

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Easiest way is to run the machine at operating pressure with water and have a measuring jug and stop watch. Time the output for 1 minute. Look at measurement and you can find out what it should be outputting per minute at what pressure. But at least u can compre a heap of nozzles output per minute to each other. If there is a large variation then they are buggered. Replace them all not just a few as they will never be the same.
If u are concerned they not putting out a good pattern then u can get some of that water sensitive paper and drive the boom over it to check the spray pattern.
Easiest and quickest way is to measure output. You might be amazed how much variation can occur. Which then means your chemical is going on at different rates.
 

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Depends on type also, stainless steel last the longest. Sometimes you can see the pattern changing when you are spraying. I try to get 40,000 acres out of a set then replace them, one year, but it is cheap insurance to put new ones on to keep an uniform pattern.
 

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Dirty water from a dugout will wear out the nozzle faster than anything else. If your using clean well water they last a long time. Best to measure them with calibration cups or just buy a new set every 40,000 acres (with clean water)if your worried.
 

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Dirty water from a dugout will wear out the nozzle faster than anything else. If your using clean well water they last a long time. Best to measure them with calibration cups or just buy a new set every 40,000 acres (with clean water)if your worried.
Well water here in Sask. is way too hard to use in a sprayer. I and most that I know of are pumping from sloughs or dugouts. Warmer water and no minerals are better that cold , hard water from a deep well.
I got away with using well water for a few years but one chemical (was it roundup) reacted so bad that it turned into white paste plugging every screen and nozzle.
 

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Do you guys think running nozzles at higher pressures wears them out quicker?
Yes, but I'm going to run high pressures anyway.

40,000 acres, ha ha ha! That would be a few life times for guys like me!

Anyway, that would depend greatly on the width of your sprayer, no?
Yes, it would also depend on nozzle, size and pressure.

I thought the ceramic ones were supposed to last the longest???

Andrew
Not sure on lasting longest, but after 120,000 acres, my ceramics varied less than 5% of new ones. When you consider 100% overlap, that's less than 2.5% variation in application rate from new ones. Pattern still looked the same as new ones, so I couldn't see a need for replacing them.
 

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I was using stainless steel nozzles at 60' of sprayer, soft shallow well water and checked my tips at 40,000 acres (approximately) and they were still good to go. I don't know anything about ceramic so I can't comment on that.

As far as well water compared to dugout water, my dugouts are usally full of cow manure, sand, algae and little shrimp looking things. I screened and filtered the water and spent as much time cleaning as I ever did spraying. With clean water I only ever check the screens and filters. I guess it's a regional thing depending on water quality. Or maybe if you don't have cattle around it would help a lot. (And I now have most of my dugouts fenced)
 

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I used water from my yard this spring to begin with spraying as the water truck was still hauling fert as we where later seeding. Anyways we don't drink my water its fairly hard its drinkable but a good taste to it. I sprayed pre seed burn off on 536 acres that we seeded to flax using 1 litre of glyphosate and then I sprayed 130 acres of glyphosate + heat on a quarter destined to be oats. (it was canola the year before added heat to kill volunteer canola) The flax ground was a mess the kill was terrible lots of wild oats the oat field was also a disaster of volunteer canola so my conclusion is my water hampered both chemicals from working correctly the oat field had some kill though hardly touched the volunteer canola the flax had no kill. Heat is usually and effective product in fields using well water from the RM we had an excellent kill. hopefully the in crop chemical works well as our fields look terrible this year
 

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I used water from my yard so my conclusion is my water hampered both chemicals from working correctly
Yes, this is not new science. I remember reading in Grainews about the benefits of using soft, warm water from the surface (dugout or slough)rather than mineral laden, cold well water. Read all about it in this article..
Check water quality before spraying - Grainews
 
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