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How old is too old of a combine to take on the harvest run for next summer? Got a 97 JD9600 I think is in OK shape. If we decide to do this I would put it in the shop this winter and go through it and install some major upgrades like enclosed cylinder and whatever else to help performance. Probably would like to get a 36 ft macron flex draper. I've seen some guys using equipment that old but any thoughts would be appreciated. Thanks
 

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I'd like to go down and start in Tx in May and at least cut into KS . Just want to get started without a mountain off debt.
 

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I think the 9600 is as reliable combine as ever put in the field but the hiring prospects of a 20 year old machine may not be as considerate.

Have you ever been on a run or are you going in blind?
How old are you?
 

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Yes I've been on a run once, mid 40's. I'm not professing to knowing it all but I believe I'm knowledgeable, with a lot to learn. You are right about the self confidence. That's why I'm asking, if I had 15 year newer machine but had more hours which is worse? I have about 600 acres of my own Milo to cut this fall and I will have more knowledge of my machine as I just purchased it.
 

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If you are confident in your machine, charge a realistic price, be very social able, sleep very little it can be done

One thing is if it's wet put a set of big tires on it and you will have lots of clean up work to do, I also think a 30' head should be in the tool box as well
 

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If I was hiring someone I would want good straw/chaff chopping/spreading as part of the package, a 9600 isn't very good in that department. For that reason I would stick with a 30' header as a maximum width like SWFarmService says.
 

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When we used to run 9600s we would send them to dealer for inspection then spend time in the winter tearing them down and fixing or replacing what need to be done. More often than not we could run our entire season (about 200 sep hr) without fixing anything. We had one machine over 4500 eng hours. Fast forward to today . . . a brand new rotary combine can't even run 50 hours without needing something. I would have some concerns about your "hire-ability" I personally don't want to go back to the cracked wheat and larger losses that we had with the 9600, and as stated the chopping/spreading of the straw would be a concern for those reasons I wouldn't hire you.
 

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Just for info, when a combine gets that far south residue management goes out the window because of heavy grazing of the winter wheat on alot of farms, different world down there, especially if a guy crosses over to Colorado
 

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If you know your 96xx walker machine and only run it to its capacity you won't loose any more grain than your rotary. In some crops you could actually do better than your rotary. (ie. Canola Sunflowers)
 

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I have never seen a walker machine do better in canola than a rotary. We have owned both at the same time and the difference in the amount thrown over was quite drastic.
 

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I have never seen a walker machine do better in canola than a rotary. We have owned both at the same time and the difference in the amount thrown over was quite drastic.
That's strange, I would go conventional any day in canola up against a axial or Lexion, the shoe load if set even half ways correct is half, the transitions of rotary combines tear it up too much
 

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would never hire a 9600 bad spreading low capacity and cleaning. but if you know a bunch of people that you could for sure go to then why not.
 

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That's strange, I would go conventional any day in canola up against a axial or Lexion, the shoe load if set even half ways correct is half, the transitions of rotary combines tear it up too much
Different conditions I guess. Ran both side by each and rotary for canola hands down. Walkers can't seperate the seed from the straw and chaff around here.
But I'm talking a real rotary made for small grains the ones with 2....not corn and bean machines adapted for small grains.
 
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