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Weather sucks here and I want be ready to dry grain just in case mother nature does not come through. I expect the wheat to get to 18 moisture or less and the canola to get to 14 or less before I will have to combine. At least that is my hope. Normally grain is dry here at harvest.

Have a 7500 bushel hopper bin with a rocket aeration system and a 7.5 hp high speed centrifugal fan and a 350,000 btu air-o-matic heater. Also have a few 5000 bushel flat bottom bins with full floor aeration and a 300,000 btu diesel herman nelson if needed.

No question that the grain will dry with the additional heat as long as the bin is not too full. Problem I hear about is that the bottom grain is extremely over dry (like 3-6% moisture) and the top grain is still tough. So how do you get this grain blended to evenly dry when you move it to another bin? Would be nice to have the (very dry 4% stuff mixed with the tough 18% stuff to come up with and average dry of 14 and not have any spoilage. I find lots of posts about this problem, but very little on how exactly to handle the dried grain to blend it to dry.

Or are there different methods to handle the supplemental heat so the bin is dried more evenly? Ie, turn the hopper bin every day? Or turn the heater on for 4 hours and then off for 8 hours, etc? Over dry the whole bin to 5% and then blend it with tough grain from the bin beside it? I may have to keep this grain till spring or summer before selling, so would be nice if it is safe to store when done. I do have have aeration in other bins that the dried and blended grain can be moved to when done. Fans on these other bins can be run 1 or 2 nights to stabilize the grain as they are run from diesel generator, so too expensive to leave the fan on for a month.
 

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Did a crap load of this in 2016. Over-dried the entire bin minus maybe the top 1000 bu on 9000bu bins. Blend out with tough that was as high as 20-21% in smaller batches like 3 ton or tandem loads to get the overall bin average that you're dumping it back into to be about 14 or so on wheat. Never had a minutes trouble. I think the trick though was making sure that the layers weren't overly thick when dumping them into the bin that you're hoping to keep it in long term storage for.

When I hauled it out the next spring/summer, it didn't seem to matter where you grabbed your sample, it was always within a few tenths of what the bin average was supposed to be.
 
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