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Discussion Starter #1
Looking to make an idiot proof tool for levelling out no-till fields that have been subject to years of plowing and one ways. Lots of strike outs, and dead furrows, old fence lines, and just alernating high and low from last time they were plowed. Plus areas where I have been doing landscaping, but it is usually either too wet, or too frozen to complete the job at the time. Makes combining flat crops a nightmare, seeding depth inconsistent, allows water ponding etc.

Idiot proof because this would probably have to happen in the spring at the same time as seeding( haven't had post harvest anything in recent years, when combining in the snow, if at all), so I want to be able to turn anyone loose and say drive over that ridge until it isn't a ridge anymore, or an entire field. It takes more skill, practice and a calibrated eyeball to do the same with heavy equipment. And don't want to work the areas up, since it makes seeding depth impossible when areas are and aren't worked in the same field.

Can I just get the biggest I beam I can find, hook up two cables and go, or does it need corners to keep it standing up, and carry dirt? Horseshoe shape? Multiple beams behind each other? Railroad ties? Shorter beams staggered behind each other to follow the contours better, and smooth out the ridges from the first beam? Or am I delusional to think I can drag no till ground with anything less than the D8 on the front?
 

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I have seen a unit made out of old mine tires that were huge. Hooked a bunch of them together in 2 offset rows and they seemed to level real well and were very durable. Not sure if they would do fence rows and things like that as it might do more smoothing than leveling.
 

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Just one straight beam would make ridges out the ends eventually, and without a way to hold it straight it might have a lot of side to side movement leaving hinges worse than when you started. If you had an old harrow packer bar maybe you could just use the Center section and hang 2 beams on opposite angles where the harrows go, then you have better control over pressure and forward movement
 

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We have a 12” I beam that we use for similar situations. We have a chain coming from each end to a clevis. As long as you go slow it’s not bad. If you are looking for a smooth finish you might want to cut the ends on a taper to smooth out the ends
 

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At one place I worked at they had an old cat rail chain that the pads bolt onto. There is enough weight there to move dirt around and we tied it onto a 1 ton flatdeck to level out the yard after it was wet . Used wire cable to tow with. After about 5 mins it was hard to pull as you dragging around quite a bit of dirt and gravel as the rail would turn into a half moon full of dirt and dropping it off in the low spots as you went
 

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We have a float just like that. Large I-Beam with a d8 cat track rail attached to each end that forms a U behind it that works fantastic on the roads. It would smooth out the ruts really well but its not going to cut large high's and fill large lows.
 

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If you don’t want the beam ridge on the ends you need a skid plate on each end. Last big float I built involved an 8 rail on a pipe drawbar with a cable tow. Behind that cabled separate was 3 uke tires. I drilled a hole in the middle of the face of each tire which a large rod and eye was affixed. Pulled it on freshly brushed ground. Worked very well
 

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Discussion Starter #8
If you don’t want the beam ridge on the ends you need a skid plate on each end. Last big float I built involved an 8 rail on a pipe drawbar with a cable tow. Behind that cabled separate was 3 uke tires. I drilled a hole in the middle of the face of each tire which a large rod and eye was affixed. Pulled it on freshly brushed ground. Worked very well
Not sure I follow. Does the D8 track rail attached to each end of the pipe, and that way it doesn't need to be all welded together, it just makes a horseshoe shape?
 

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Not sure I follow. Does the D8 track rail attached to each end of the pipe, and that way it doesn't need to be all welded together, it just makes a horseshoe shape?
Yes. The rail is attached at the ends to the ends of pipe. Think the pipe I had was 18’ wide. Need a rugged pipe or better yet I beam. Had a 4” 1/2” wall stater pipe which bent in a U. The uke tires had a double pipe truss I made and that didn’t bend. I can’t see why an I beam like a 2’ with the rail attached behind wouldn’t work provided you had skid plates at the ends. My hard clay soil when dry enough to float in hay situations is next to impossible to level with anything aside from working it up.
 
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