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Discussion Starter #1
My first time running a rotor and never had a problem setting my walker. I know how to set for cob size and it is taking the corn off the cob fine, but I'm having free grain floating around at the rear of the rotor on power shutdown. When I open the back and windrow it, there is too much grain in the fluff. No shoe loss. This is 22 % corn rotor 310, round bar concave 25, wind 850, 53 lb test weight corn, 4.5 to 5 mph with a 8 row chopping head. There is not much trash coming in except husks. It seems corn is getting caught in the husks. I've tried everything, more and less on concave, rotor speed, and ground speed. Spacers are in. Any ideas for me? I could go 4.5 to 5mph with my walker and I was expecting more from the rotor.
 

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You can't fully rely on a powershutdown. It is impossible to say that the corn would be there in the back of the rotor if you had been going 5 mph at 2200 rpm all day long, even though it was in the back when you hit the brakes and turned the key off while the machine came coasting to a stop. I am not saying you don't have corn going out the back, but assuming you do because of a powershutdown is not a good assumption to make. Do your sensors work for your rotor? Are you familiar with the grain loss monitoring and trust it that it works and is half accurate? What does it say for rotor loss? Can you stop the rear spreader/chopper and get a better in-field sample of rotor loss instead of through a powershutdown when the rotor is coming to a stop? Goodluck and sorry I don't have any solution. I run red and my solution was to install disruptors to get every last kernal out of the rotor.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply. Yep the sensors are showing higher rotor loss. In my post I did windrow it out the back and went through the chaff and verrified what my monitor was saying at my running speed. How do the disrupters work?
 

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We have the same problem with a 9660 with grain loss and bad sample and we have a walker with no grain loss and good sample with less headaches to set.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Are the disrupters the same as interrupters and do you have to modify them to work on the deere? Tried to find interrupters but no luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I honestly can't believe there isn't more mentioned about this. Maybe in dry corn it works better, but I am NOT impressed in wet corn. Way too much loss. Our dealer said the spacers were supposed to help with rotor loss and to also slow the rotor down because they thought is was rifling throug too fast. We tried speeding the rotor up but it didn't help. Our walker was WAY better at sorting and saving corn. I still think its getting carried with the husks and isn't getting time to drop through the concave.
 

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if you truly want to fix the problem get rid of the round bar concaves. they might work OK in dry corn but not wet corn. there is not enough space between the bars to drop the corn though. another thing is a round bar tends to bounce the corn back into the rotor instead of falling though. think of the last time you dumped corn at the elevator on a round bar grate. half of it bounces back at you. its no different in the rotor. the problem only gets worst in wet corn. the load on the concave is always in the front you have to drop the corn fast or it will just grind it up and carry it out the back. and in wet corn you just have to slow down give it time to fall though. I don't want to sound like a know it all. but up north we go though this almost ever year. go with a aftermarket concave like a kuchar and you will be much happier.
 

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wouldn't those spacers serve the same purpose of opening concave further??? I thought the spacers were only for the grates.
 

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They are as that's where the tines are that usually "pinch" the cob between the end the grates causing breakage. I have heard of guys having good luck with using large wire concaves with evey other wire removed?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the replies. We are in a relative dry pocket and have been combining 23% corn so I wouldn't consider that excessively wet, but wetter than in the past. We too have to run the concave narrower than what the cob says just to keep the rotor loss down. We are running 4 to 4.3 mph and limmiting the trash coming in, so I just don't think it should be struggling this much, especially for what we pay and all the hype on the bullet. A tech said to take the bars off the accelerator and that should help with the grinding. I agree on the corn bouncing back and that the opening back where the tines are, should be a lot more open because there is very limmited pressure on the shoe. Is the large wire concave put in the front section or all of them? I assume the kucher concave solution replaces all of them.
 

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yes take those serrated strips off that forage chopper feed roll thing thy call a feed accelerator. it will feed just fine. I took mine out and put a paddle type in. with the kuchar system you replace the first three concaves. his concaves have way bigger openings than the round bars. I don't have any experience with the large wire ones. the john Deere separator grates are OK. drop the corn up front where you should and there wont be much back at the separator grates. you are lucky to have 23% corn. the driest I could find yesterday was 36%.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
That's a tuff go at 36%. Hopefully it dried down a bunch now. We did end up using the 9650 sprocket on the feeder house to help the grinding which helped a bunch. The rotor loss has gotten better in 20% corn but still too much and it limits our ground speed so we are going to look into the kucher after harvest. He said if we didn't like it we didn't have to keep it which works for me. Pretty spendy though but I haven't looked at the stock cost either. Did you get the kucher rasp bars too?
 

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Unlike a walker, the rotor needs centrifugal force to throw out the grain.

I run my rotor at 400-425 and I'm in 20-23% corn. Fan at 850-900. Set spacing tight enough to see broken cob on ground, then back off 2 at a time until you see close to full size cob. I didn't give number because each corn varity varies. I might have 1 kernal in 3 ft sq. going 5.1 -5.3 with 2008 9670STS
 

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I put the rotor bars on, the concaves,and the feed accelerator. still picking 30 to 34% corn. rotor at 420, concave 30, fan 1200, chaffer18, sieve10 surprisingly the sample doesn't look to bad even though its this wet. if you would like to talk more you can call my cell phone 815-985-5507
 

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Hi, I am The Disrupter Guy, My name is Don Estes, I owned and operated Estes Mfg. Co. in Flanagan Il for 43 years, I retired but I'm now back to work as a consultant for C M Welding in Frankfort Indiana. I have made a few sets of The Disrupters for the JD rotors but nobody would admit to rotor loss because of corn shucks. Well it does happen as you know. I was at the Farm Progress show in Iowa in 1999 when the new JD rotors came out. The 2388 was not loosing as much as the JD but close. We put Disrupters in the Case IH and a month later Case had The Disrupter in there parts. Call me sometime and I'll work on something for you if you like (765)891-1722 Thanks, Donnei
 

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Hi, The Disrupter Guy again.. I had a booth at the Ill-Indiana Farm Show this week and after hearing you guy's comments on this page and visiting with a lot of farmers at Indy, rotor loss on the STS is a very important issue and it should be addrested. The direction of travel on the rotor machines is forgiving and is very gentle on your crop. The reason it is forgiving is that it is a auger, and moves the crop at a much slower speed then the conventional cylinder. The same thing happenes in he thrashing but only at a slower and more gentle pace. By the same token the rotor is much more gentle on the straw, and corn shucks. The only way corn can get out the back of a spinning rotor is on a whole or large peice of corn shuck. The Disrupter lugs installed in the seperation section or rear grate, and with the assistance of the rotor's single tines, will disrupt the flow and cause the shucks to be broken up in small pieces and lieve the kernels in the machine. Another thing about wires in the concaves, is that their only job is to keep the cobs out of the sample. Wider spaced wires is always better because the more corn you seperate up front the less you have to contend with in the back. I hope to have a proto type in the field this week and if all goes well I will be at Louiville with the new JD Disrupters this February. I appreciate any and all sugestions and comments on this matter so feel free to call me any time. C M Welding Inc. Frankfort In. 765-891-1722 Thanks, Donnie
 
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