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I have got about 1000kms (600) miles to walk my tr 98 an it is cheaper to walk it then truck it i was just woundring is there any way i can pick up a couple km an/hr it does 25k/hr if it could do 30k/hr it would make a big difference
 

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Re: HOW TO MAKE A COMBINE GO FASTER

I don't see roading a header to be any cheaper than load/hauling one--especially for that distance. Even adding another 5-10 Km/hr to ground speed, is still a very long trip. Also, consider the high wear on your header's final drives. There's a huge difference between field and road gear, all day long. Headers simply are not made for sustained travel in "road" gear. Therefore cost of final drive wear must be factored into the equation.

Whatever you decide, be safe. It's a long, arduous trip for both of you.
 

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Re: HOW TO MAKE A COMBINE GO FASTER

are you factoring all your expenses?? I've worked it out to cost about $4/km to road them.. Including things like escort vechicle costs, meals and accomodation for 2 people, wages, etc. but excluding any wear on the header. I would think wear wouldn't be that high tho.. a few cents a km maybe...
 

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Re: HOW TO MAKE A COMBINE GO FASTER

Inflating the drive tires to maximum of 40 or 50 psi will give you a larger rolling diameter that will give you more ground speed. It will also help reduce the heat build up in the tire and prolong its life.

The unloading auger will likely have to be braced, like they do on trucks and trains for long delivery distances. The constant whipping up and down on the road will be hard on it.

If it is a cheap purchase then roading it probably makes sense. If it cost a fair few dollars, then I would definately have it hauled. I had one trucked a year ago 700 km and it cost me $2500. Lots of trucks and dealers with trucks need backhauls, and if you have lots of time to wait for a back hual it may be cost effective.
 

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Re: HOW TO MAKE A COMBINE GO FASTER

no no no NO do not over inflate the tires!

this is a myth, if it changes the diameter, its causing problems. It will make the combine ride rougher and make it harder to handle. not to mention, its REALLY hard on tires!
 

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Re: HOW TO MAKE A COMBINE GO FASTER

We walk ours over 2500 kilometres a year, and have done for years. We have never had final drive issues. We had a 9600 that had done 7000 hours and never missed a beat.

Buzzhillside, I'm not sure about the new hollands, on our JD's you can adjust the hydo cable and they end doing about 40. I agree 25 is slow and I would be looking for something. I also agree with you that walking them in oz is far cheaper than trucking them, when i was over in the states it was a different story.
 

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Re: HOW TO MAKE A COMBINE GO FASTER

For North Americans - Roading combines is standard practice in Australia. When I was there only the big crews had trucks to haul combines.
 

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Re: HOW TO MAKE A COMBINE GO FASTER

What about depreciation? How amny $ per hour does it cost and how many hours lost harvesting? Roading a machine that far does not seem practical. We haul machines if it it 30 miles or so and up.
 

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Re: HOW TO MAKE A COMBINE GO FASTER

We usually don't lose that much time. Between crops the most we road is about 400 kms (240miles) , which in our long summer days you can do in two days. We harvest north to south and have only walked them the full distance in one hit once, heading north pre-harvest when their was no summer rain and no milo to harvest. If everything goes well, after wheat they are spread out part of the way back to our starting point harvesting corn, rice and milo.

It is different here, it is the farmers responsibility to haul the grain away or organise trucking firms to do it. I spent two full years in North America and realise that most cutters have as many trucks as combines which haul grain during harvest and combines when not. Here is different, some guys have 1 or maybe 2 road trains to capitalise hauling grain, but otherwise they have to own 2,3,4,6 trucks to haul combines with and then find work for them in the off season. Some guys buy one dedicated combine hauling truck but if you have 4 or more combines, by the time he makes 4 trips they would have all been roaded to their destination.
 
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