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I have a tri axle pup trailer I’d like to tow with my front wheel assist this spring for seed so I won’t have to leave the field to go fill during the day. I can slacken off the brakes but would need the air if the suspension. Anyone ever made a hydraulic compressor to pressure the air tanks.
 

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Not me but my brother rented a jeep for his B train to haul bales with the tractor, it had a hydraulic drive air compressor. It didn't have the valve to activate the brakes, which it should have. It just released the Maxi's.
 

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For all the time it would need to run, why not a gas compressor, assuming you have room. Fire it up, get where you need to go, shut it off. Assuming you had room to mount it
 

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For all the time it would need to run, why not a gas compressor, assuming you have room. Fire it up, get where you need to go, shut it off. Assuming you had room to mount it
Not sure if it would work with a trailer that had leaks but you can buy 12 volt compressors really cheap. We put one in our pickup to charge the air bags on the back axle so we don’t have to go looking for air when we load it. It works great for that. Many different ones available online. Our local parts store had a special on for $70 so it wasn’t much risk!
 

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Off topic, but it's interesting to me that North American tractors have never or rarely had trailer brake systems of any kind, but they are required in Europe and elsewhere, at least for implements over a certain size and weight. Do any of the big grain carts have braking systems? How do they work?

I would think a 12V compressor would be able to keep the trailer aired up enough to move it, although it might take a while for the pressure to build after loading the trailer and having the suspension eat up air pressure.
 

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At tractor speeds, why not just let it ride on the stops without any air in the suspension? Can't see it doing any harm, unless you need the height to unload?
I use our pup behind a tractor at seeding and harvest, but it has spring suspension, which is a pain for loading legal weights, but sure simplifies using it on the tractors. I just stick all 6 caging bolts in before I unhook the truck, doesn't take long.

That said, brakes would be a really good idea, this thing can really push the tractor around, and especially around corners if you miscalculate the speed, it really wants to go straight, being able to slow it down faster would be rally helpful for that. If you do add a hydraulic driven compressor, I would find a way to make the service brakes functional. Could even use another hydrualic outlet, a small hyd cylinder pushing on a spike valve.
 

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Off topic, but it's interesting to me that North American tractors have never or rarely had trailer brake systems of any kind, but they are required in Europe and elsewhere, at least for implements over a certain size and weight. Do any of the big grain carts have braking systems? How do they work?

I would think a 12V compressor would be able to keep the trailer aired up enough to move it, although it might take a while for the pressure to build after loading the trailer and having the suspension eat up air pressure.
Some of the big carts have hydraulic brakes. Activated by the brake light circuit, or a separate controller
 

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At tractor speeds, why not just let it ride on the stops without any air in the suspension? Can't see it doing any harm, unless you need the height to unload?
I use our pup behind a tractor at seeding and harvest, but it has spring suspension, which is a pain for loading legal weights, but sure simplifies using it on the tractors. I just stick all 6 caging bolts in before I unhook the truck, doesn't take long.

That said, brakes would be a really good idea, this thing can really push the tractor around, and especially around corners if you miscalculate the speed, it really wants to go straight, being able to slow it down faster would be rally helpful for that. If you do add a hydraulic driven compressor, I would find a way to make the service brakes functional. Could even use another hydrualic outlet, a small hyd cylinder pushing on a spike valve.
Or run a couple air lines into the cab and use a hand valve to apply?
I heard( but didn’t see it) of a guy putting a foot valve on the floor beside his tractor’s brake pedal When he pushed the brake pedal, it applied the air brakes at the same time. I pulled a 40’ tandem grain trailer behind a smaller 4 wheel drive tractor a few years ago and it was really dangerous in the hills. I wouldn’t put just anyone in that machine!
 

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Probably better to run a belt drive rather than direct drive on the pump to minimize pulse
 

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Haven't got there yet but am putting a hydraulic drive compressor on my 875 to run a fan clutch for cooler weather use, can't stand that cold blooded Cummins smoking because that dam fan running constantly won't let it warm up.
Have to give the Russians credit, the air system on my old Kirovets is one handy setup for everything up to and including even operating trailer brakes
But for the application here, some air ride systems don't like running on no air, but like Orsy said about a gas powered one, tie it on the hitch or somewhere, those 12 volt electric ones are a joke for a application like this, need something that can actually produce some air. Also since you would be supplying the air thru the emergency line, would also be no need to back off the brakes either as they will release once pressure builds over @40psi and to reapply them, simply remove the supply line, instant park brake.
 

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The one my brother used was home built, a 100 lb propane bottle for the tank, a hyd. motor drove the compressor through belts. it worked quite well but brakes were needed, my brother was pushed by those super b's more than once.
 

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Doesn't your 875 have the mount for a factory engine compressor?

Also, I agree on the gas powered one. Just don't drive away until all brakes are released. I try to tell everyone to not move until system is over 90 psi.
 

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Doesn't your 875 have the mount for a factory engine compressor?
Oh yea I could put one on the engine, even have all the rigging off parts engines from trucks I've junked, but that would be a fair bit of work and for what I really want it for it don't need to be that fancy. Even if it leaks, how much air does a Horton hub take lol. Would only be for in the fall to spring, in summer would just put the bolts in and lock it up.
Figured I's put it in the back of the cab just to the left of the hydraulic valve bank, and have some of those propane tanks of the two little ones hooked together off of vehicles, nice and low to mount on the front of the rear section and wouldn't obstruct view of drawbar. For the little it would need to run, heat wouldn't be an issue either inside that box I wouldn't think, would keep it all neat and tidy and dry to boot.
 

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Old valves were application priority, new ones are parking priority

So sit till system blows off if you are in slippery going
 
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