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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Has anyone successfully sped up the reel lift/lower and fore/aft hydraulics on a 500 or 700 series Claas?
MacDon uses cylinders that are about three times as large in volume as on Claas headers/fronts slowing down cycle times to a glacial level!:(
 

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Can you say "New Holland"??? Kidding :D

It's not programmable is it? If they use load sensing hydraulics and your feeling lucky they might have adjustable spools on the valve bank. Otherwise I wonder if Mac Don is using orifices somewhere in their plumbing to reduce speed, you could listen for hissing noises when someone is moving the the reel fore/aft or up/down.
 

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Can you say "New Holland"??? Kidding :D

It's not programmable is it? If they use load sensing hydraulics and your feeling lucky they might have adjustable spools on the valve bank. Otherwise I wonder if Mac Don is using orifices somewhere in their plumbing to reduce speed, you could listen for hissing noises when someone is moving the the reel fore/aft or up/down.
No electronic means of setting.
Can't find anything mechanically adjustable.
Possible on the MacDon side, I have removed orifices before and also remember removing an orfice in an STS that while not fast made reel lift/drop better.

I've always had this issue regardless of combine, TR, TX, STS and now Claas. You end up just kinda living with it.:(
 

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This might work for the reel lift only, depending on a few things. If the reel circuit actually has two lines operating it, there is a good chance that it is only designed as a single acting circuit because there is really no need to hydraulically pull the reel downward.

In any case I doubt if it would prevent this from working as long as the rams are rather oversized for the need.

By disconnecting the shaft side line and then teeing it into the lift line, the reel would now raise simply by the physical force differential between the shaft side of the pistons and the open side, even though the pressures are equal, there is a large differential in piston area.

In the lift mode, fluid exiting from the shaft side would flow through the tee and join the lifting flow as additional fluid volume.

On the lowering cycle, (part), of returning flow from the open side of the piston would pass through the tee and enter the shaft side on the cylinders and the balance of the fluid would return to the reservoir via the valve.

I think?
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Your thinking of a regeneration circuit Haystack which could be done with a double check valve on the rod side of the cylinder. Only problem is I think those circuits both run slave cylinders so the rod end of the master cylinder sends it's oil to the the other cylinder.

Our CXs and New Holland swathers don't have this problem with Honey Bee. Is the MacDon cylinders that much bigger? If so I wonder why, I'll have to have a look at one. What model is it Don? You can small cylinders under a hundred bucks Princess Auto and Wajax but if it's running a slave system there will be some matching to do.
 

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Yes, the slave would also have to be ported on the shaft side which is the only reason I can see for two lines from the combine to the reel. If there is only one line the slave is likely single acting with a simple dust wiper seal on the shaft.
 

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This might work for the reel lift only, depending on a few things. If the reel circuit actually has two lines operating it, there is a good chance that it is only designed as a single acting circuit because there is really no need to hydraulically pull the reel downward.

In any case I doubt if it would prevent this from working as long as the rams are rather oversized for the need.

By disconnecting the shaft side line and then teeing it into the lift line, the reel would now raise simply by the physical force differential between the shaft side of the pistons and the open side, even though the pressures are equal, there is a large differential in piston area.

In the lift mode, fluid exiting from the shaft side would flow through the tee and join the lifting flow as additional fluid volume.

On the lowering cycle, (part), of returning flow from the open side of the piston would pass through the tee and enter the shaft side on the cylinders and the balance of the fluid would return to the reservoir via the valve.

I think?
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You are correct in that the reel lift is a single pressurized line and no pressure for lowering. The Macdon is a three cylinder slave design. I don't think this would allow the cylinder to be hooked up in such a way.

To state the method another way, if you tie each cylinder port together the ram extension will go much quicker.

When you go to extend the cylinder, both sides become pressurized. You think it won't move then...but it will. The piston side has more power than the ram side because of the larger fluid surface area, so the cylinder extends at a fast rate, because the ram and piston side are hooked together. The oil pump supplies oil to the piston and also the ram side because the fluid is exiting it upon extension.

Although you get a fast rate of extension, your power is limited as both sides of the cylinder become pressurized, and the ram side is fighting the piston side. There are setups that use this and then when fluid pressure reaches a set point, the lines separate to act like a typical setup, slower with more power.

I suspect this might be how fast raising floor jacks are setup, but I don't know for sure.
 

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http://www.thecombineforum.com/forums/12-claas-lexion/39069-f540-macdon.html

I have mentioned before of orifices that I drilled out for faster reel and header tilt functions. It has been awhile since I did it. I don't remember if there was an orifice for the reel lift but would bet it has one. The MD parts book shows some orifices, and also left out a few that I found. A little trial and error, or even timing the oil flow in a measuring device at the cylinder and then at the solenoid behind the multi-coupler could verify restrictions.
 

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Don, have you been able to take a look at a parts manual, online or otherwise to determine if MacDon uses a restrictor for that header. I went through that last year with our 2952 swather because I changed out both reel cylinders and found out that the restrictor that came with the master ram was too large and the reel went far too fast up or down and was able to purchase the correct restrictor for our width of reel.

Conversely with our 9600 with the honey bee header, we never have had any success in doing anything because the combine itself uses a certain sized orifice in the hydraulic system and off the start we had a JD service tech experiment with a different orifice meant for another function and in that case the system wouldn't hold pressure and the reel dropped. All I can say is to find out what if any restrictors are on the MacDon side and what if any flow adjustments are able to be made on the Claas side if you can find someone at the dealer that knows anything .... that is usually the hardest part ! .
 
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