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Discussion Starter #1
I'm no big fan of the STS combines. I in fact run another color but have owned a 9750STS for a few years and ran another 9650 STS on the wheat harvest for a summer. One of the very few things I actually like on those machines were the hydraulic driven chaff/straw spreader. I loved being able to speed them up and slow them down from the cab and the ability to drop straw easily was another plus.
I now run Massey combines. 9895 to be exact. It has a small Redekop chaff spreader thats hyd driven and 2 larger spinners for the straw that are belt driven. What I want to do is somehow adapt the JD design onto the Massey machine. Just run one set of spinners for both chaff and straw. I have a hard time in green or damp soybean straw choking up the chaff spinners. We rarely get a killing frost til way into the harvest season but when we do its night and day difference.

Anyone know how the Deere spinner hydraulic system is tied into the rest of the machine? Any diagrams of that? Any idea how much oil flow is needed at the highest rpm? I already have the small Redekop spinners and I could possibly use the oil flow there but I'm not real sure on the gallons per minute it flows or what might be needed for the Deere style setup.

Any help on this would be greatly appreciated. I'm going at it blind with not much help from either Deere or Massey...they all think I'm crazy.
 

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I can not help but am sure it would be possible so Good Luck I bought a 9760 with a speader and concerned if we can spread bean straw even and wide enough to notill corn in the spring. If you have any thoughts I would apreciate them.
 

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The straw spreader drive system provides a mechanism to distribute the straw coming from the STS rotor discharge and the chaff coming off of the cleaning shoe. The straw spreader disks turn any time the engine is running and the separator is engaged. A three position rocker switch on the armrest control console controls spreader disk speed and width of spread.

The straw spreader drive system uses its own dedicated pump, control valve, and hydraulic motors, but shares the same filter and reservoir with the main hydraulic system and the reel/belt drive system.

When the separator is engaged, mechanical power is provided to the straw spreader hydraulic pump by the straw chopper jack shaft. Oil flow from the spreader pump is first directed to the straw spreader flow control valve, then to the straw spreader motors, and back to reservoir through the hydraulic filter.

An electric motor-actuator attached to the straw spreader flow control valve opens and closes the metering valve to control oil flow to the spreader motors. Opening the metering valve increases oil flow to the spreader motors, which increases spreader disk speed and width of spread. In the same manner, closing the metering valve reduces the flow of oil to the spreader motors, which decreases spreader disk speed and width of spread.

The straw spreader flow control valve is pressure compensated to keep spreader disk speed constant as the load on the spreader disks changes. When the valve is adjusted to the minimum setting, there is still a small amount of oil flowing to the motors and it is normal for the spinners to continue to turn at a minimum speed. A pressure relief valve within the flow control valve protects the system should the spreaders become plugged.

The work flow from the flow control valve is routed to the spreader motors through quick-couplers. The spreader motors are connected in series and should turn in opposite directions at approximately the same speed.

With the exception of short (30 second maximum) pressure checks, the hydraulic couplers must always be connected to the motors to provide an open loop for oil flow. If the hoses are not connected to the motors or each other, the system will be forced over relief and will overheat the hydraulic oil.
 

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The straw spreader drive system is an open center hydraulic circuit with a fixed displacement pump. Pressurized oil from the straw spreader pump enters the flow control valve through the inlet port, where the metering valve divides it into work flow (to the spreader motors) and return flow (to reservoir). The operator controls the amount of work flow by opening and closing the metering valve.

The compensator spool inside the flow control valve responds to the setting of the metering valve by shifting to the right and opening a path to the return port . This allows the excess oil that is not needed to drive the spreader motors to return to reservoir. Open center pressure is determined by the strength of the compensator spool spring and the number of shim washers . The pressure at the inlet port will always equal the pressure at the work port, plus the spring pressure.
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How far the compensator spool shifts is determined by the setting of the metering valve. When the flow control valve is set to the minimum position, the metering valve is completely closed and no oil can flow through the metering slot . A small amount of oil can still flow through a small hole in the metering plug to the straw spreader motors, but the compensator spool shifts far off its seat to allow the majority of the pump flow to go to the return port.
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As spreader speed is increased, the metering valve is opened and the amount of oil flowing to the spreader motor increases while the amount of oil going to return decreases. The compensator spool shifts to the left as spreader speed is increased, to decrease the amount of oil flowing to the return port.
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The compensator spool and spring also establishes priority flow to the spreader motors by preventing the oil from taking the path of least resistance to reservoir. Any oil flowing to reservoir must overcome work port pressure plus spring pressure, while the oil flowing to the spreader motors only has to overcome work port pressure.
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In operation, the screened passage in the work port senses the pressure required to turn the spreader motors at a given speed. This pressure is applied to the right side of the compensator spool. As the load on the straw spreader motors increases, the pressure required to turn the disks at a given speed increases, causing the pressure on the inlet side of the valve to increase. Regardless of what pressure the system is operating at, the compensator spool and spring maintains the same balance of flow between the work port and the return port.
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If the flow to the spreader motors is blocked for any reason, oil can no longer flow out of the work port of the control valve. This will cause the pressure in the work port to increase to the relief setting of the flow control valve.
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As pressure in the work port increases, the compensator spool is pushed harder to the left. With the compensator spool fully “seated” oil can no longer flow around the compensator spool to return the return port. Since no oil can flow to the spreader motors and no oil can flow to the return port, the pressure on the inlet side of the valve will increase until the relief valve poppet unseats against its spring. With the relief valve poppet unseated, oil can flow from the inlet port, through the small holes in the relief valve poppet, through the larger holes in the compensator spool to
 

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I don't understand why anyone would want those spinners. The only thing I could see it being ok for is corn. Other than that, why would you want all that unchopped residue all over your field? Even an average straw chopper can leave residue that is difficult to deal with for next year's seeding. Around here, only those that have good choppers were able to seed early enough to get a good crop going. Any field that had unchopped, heavy residue stayed cold and wet well past the idea time frame for seeding. Riceman, you say you use spinners in soybeans. That would mean a disaster here. There would be no possible way to deal with that straw. It would plug any and every deeptiller and cultivator.

Riceman, one of my customers bought a 9860 from Kansas and it had spinners. He put a Redekop chopper on it the second it got here. He would probably sell you the spinners very cheap. They are useless to him and every other farmer I know.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm interested in his spinners. I'll PM you my info if you'll pass it on to him or either get a price from him and send it my way.

We run the "rice" rotor on our machines and they chew up the straw pretty well. If I can spin it out 30+ feet then I don't need to chop it. For wheat we always burn the straw and doublecrop beans behind so no real need to either spread or chop it there. Our winters are usually wet and things rot really well also. Soybean residue that is left on the top of the soil is almost always gone by the time we start working ground and planting. It never gives us a problem in the spring. Rice straw is rolled into the mud and water so it rots and is 95% gone by spring draining time. The only thing that we really need a chopper for is milo. Its usually green when we cut it but if left alone over the winter it is brittle and just dissapears when worked in the spring.

Another major reason we don't want a chopper is the horses it takes to pull one. We tend to get into some wet ground in the late bean harvest but with no freeze up we have to keep cutting in the mud. Toting a big head trying to keep the combine full in the mud is enough of a challenge for the machine so it needs all the horses it has.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
10 gallons per minute and 2100 psi is what the Deere setup takes. Now to pick the Massey guys brains and see what I come up with.
 
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