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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright. I.H. 1680 vs J.D. 8820 T2. Which was the better Combine and why? Will also post this in the J.D. site. Lynas
 

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In dry wheat the 1680, it uses centrifugal force to seperate the grain instead of just gravity on the walkers so it saves wheat better at higher groundspeeds. The parts count is alot lower on the 1680, you don't have a hot noisy engine right next to your head and it weighs less so it does better in soft conditions. A very dyed in the wool green guy in our area had is brother inlaw help 2 years ago with his 1680 during wheat harvest. The green guy admitted that he didn't think that his two 8820's took off half of the crop. The only disadvantages i see to the 1680 compared to the 8820 is in really tough conditions and you have to change concaves from wheat to corn.
 

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In small grains,8820 is far and away better.It will thresh better,clean better and still run even when the moisture gets up.Second,the 8820 isn't hot and noisy.I've run both and the 1680 was hotter,bad A/C I guess.The 1680 is a good combine,but an 8820 will cut all day with a 1680 and do a better job of threshing than any red combine.
 

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Never had a chaff problem in our engine compartment. Yes we do have to tap the filters out fequently, but its never back in the engine compartment. I don't see how the 8820 is far and away better but you are entitled to your opinion. Both machines are capable of threshing just fine if set up right. My observation is that the 1680 has more capacity during the day, but doesn't do as well at night. Personally we have enough terraces and washouts that i shut down around dark anyway, so it is important to me to get as much done with the sun up as I can. Obviously if they weren't both good machines they wouldn't have sold so many, i just like the simplicty of the AF design. Plus i think that a rotor does a much better job getting all the grain out of the straw then a walker.
 

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the case ih all the way

the jd ur right beside the motor and in the case the motor is in the back thats the biggest difference i like
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Reason for posting this topic is that I`m considering one of these for the farm. Types of crop grown here are 40% Hard wheat, 20% Barley, 20% Chickpea, 20% Sorghum ( Milo ). I`d also consider 1688 or 9600 if budget allows. LYNAS.
 

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We just bought a 30' 8820 T2 for this harvest just gone (finished 18th last month) and are wrapt with its performance, BUT I doubt its got the same capacity as a 1680 Axial flow. Some friends/neighbours have a 1660 case and I recon the 8820 is more like its capacity or maybe even a little less but it's still a huge combine by my standards and has more than enough to keep us happy. I ended up sitting next to the engine in the 8820 and couldn't get over how quiet it is, you can have a conversation with a passenger without a problem but you do need to have a good air conditioner, but I think a Case would be the same. From what I see I think the JD is stronger built but the Case is faster, around here the service for both makes and also New Holland is good so from my perspective I don't think it would realy matter to you, they are both good.
We use our 8820 on mostly wheat (about 75%) with a bit of barley (15%) and a small amount of oats, canola, and lupins. (the other 10%)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for input, Veitchy. How many acres do you crop there?
 

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We usually put in 1500 to 1800 acres, normally 1000 acres or a little more of wheat and the rest varying amounts of Lupins , Canola, Barley and Oats. Its dryland agriculture here and our yields arn't anything like you would have over there but this old 8820 seems to work just fine. When we bought it we were thinking it would be a stop-gap for a couple of years before we got a 95/9600 JD or maybe a 2188 or a TR of some type but after using it we now think it will be a lot longer term than we were originally intending. We run a farm of 3500 acres in total which in this area is only a fairly modest operation but we also run 3500 sheep. We only paid $7000 Ausy for it but it does have 5000 hrs up, and even after doing a few maintenance jobs the previous owner had let slip we had it working in the paddock for under 10 grand. We couldn't be happier !

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Actually just looking at what I wrote I shouldn't have said we would have less yield than you , because I don't know what part of NSW you are from. I always think of the irigated parts over there but you could actually be very simmilar to here depending on where you are. Where I am is about 12"- 14" average anual rainfall.
I don't think it will matter which way you jump, from what I have seen they are both good machines.
Graham
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
We usually put in 1500 to 1800 acres, normally 1000 acres or a little more of wheat and the rest varying amounts of Lupins , Canola, Barley and Oats. Its dryland agriculture here and our yields arn't anything like you would have over there but this old 8820 seems to work just fine. When we bought it we were thinking it would be a stop-gap for a couple of years before we got a 95/9600 JD or maybe a 2188 or a TR of some type but after using it we now think it will be a lot longer term than we were originally intending. We run a farm of 3500 acres in total which in this area is only a fairly modest operation but we also run 3500 sheep. We only paid $7000 Ausy for it but it does have 5000 hrs up, and even after doing a few maintenance jobs the previous owner had let slip we had it working in the paddock for under 10 grand. We couldn't be happier !

Edit
Actually just looking at what I wrote I shouldn't have said we would have less yield than you , because I don't know what part of NSW you are from. I always think of the irigated parts over there but you could actually be very simmilar to here depending on where you are. Where I am is about 12"- 14" average anual rainfall.
I don't think it will matter which way you jump, from what I have seen they are both good machines.
Graham
We`re Northern NSW, and Dryland farming. We budget on 1 tonne/acre Wheat and Barley and 0.8 tonne/acre Chickpea. Regards. LYNAS.
 

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In small grains,8820 is far and away better.It will thresh better,clean better and still run even when the moisture gets up.Second,the 8820 isn't hot and noisy.I've run both and the 1680 was hotter,bad A/C I guess.The 1680 is a good combine,but an 8820 will cut all day with a 1680 and do a better job of threshing than any red combine.

I have to disagree with you on the 8820 being far and away better. I cut with a neighbor that had an 8820 with a 30 ft head and I had a 1480 with the small motor and a 30ft head. I cut all day with him and based on what your saying he should have went off and left me, he didn't. We cut round for round in 40 bu/acre wheat. The sample was just as good with the one as the other. He used it for seed wheat and didn't have to clean it. This was an early 8820 so I don't believe it was a T2

The extension service had a local field day with a John Deere 8820 and a CIH 1680. The 8820 cut with a 30 ft header as did the 1680. The 1680 cut a cleaner sample with more in the bin going down and back in less time. I don't know if the JD was set right or what all I know is what I saw. This was the T2 8820.

I think the thing Lynas needs to look at is the dealer support for the particular combine he buys. In our area you have to drive 50 - 60 miles for a JD dealer and 2 miles for a CIH dealer. I am sure the 8820 T2 is a good machine especially with all there are for sale it means there were a lot of them sold. Can you get parts for a 8820 like you can a 1680. The 1680, 1688, 2188, 2388 and 2588 are all basically the same combine so parts should be available for a long time. Can the same be said for the JD's?
 

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I never had any trouble getting parts for our 20 year old 8820 T2 which is more than I can say for my mates 3 year old 80-10 AF, he had to bodge up a couple of things to finnish because no parts were available in Australia !
 

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I don't know about an 8820, but I haven't had any luck getting my 1680 to clean my cereals, always full of chaff and small pieces of straw. Aside from the poor separating i like the 1680, its always been a trouble free machine. (It only has about 1400 engine hours)One thing i see it having over the Deere is the motor isn't right beside you, which would probably get annoying.
 

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I had a 9500 Deere before I bought a 2188 caseih. Going from the conventional, walker to an axial flow specialty rotor was the best harvesting decision I've ever made. If you work on your own machine, then hands down buy a caseih. I'm not gonna say caseih dont break down as often, but if they do you can usually fix them alot quicker.
 

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I was so excited, a question about two machines there is a PAMI test for!:)
Then I noticed the original post is over 3 years old.:(

Lynas is likely in a S690 or a 9230 now.;)
 

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ok Don I give what does PAMI stand for?
Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute.
They tested, among other things, combines from '75 to '92.
I'll give you some links:

Self-Propelled Grain Combines

Self-Propelled Grain Combines

http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/eng7932/$FILE/425.pdf

Self-Propelled Grain Combines

http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/eng7932/$FILE/629.pdf

It was the only testing program in the world and is absolutely a goddamn shame they still aren't testing!:mad:
 
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