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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Let's say I wanted to try something and I was'nt worried about engine longevity. Lets say for this experiment, that I needed pretty much every pony I can get. Now the 466 is on a 1680 combine, and it is bone stock right now. It has a type MW governor. If I felt it was more important for whatever reason to use this engine for the experiment and did'nt mind throwing a few dollars at it, what can I expect for output? What would you do to it to get this power? Injectors? ATAAC? Progressive turbos? What?

Thanks for any info and links to places to have the work done.
 

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Give it as much air as you can without blowing the block, and then give it the proper amount of fuel to go with that air. At some point, you'll need to get bigger injectors to get the fuel into the cylinder in the short amount of time that it needs fuel.

Everything else in the world of engine building just improves on that basic principle. Cams allow air to move in/out of the cylinder better. Ported manifolds allow air to flow smoother. Different sizes of turbos determine how quickly the air pressure is built up versus how many PSI of air pressure you want to build. The scope of your project will determine what type of turbo setup you use.

-Lance
 

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You need hypermax engineering. They have all the parts to make a tractor pull engine and the old international 466 engine is a favorite in the farm tractor class. Here is the site.

http://www.gohypermax.com/Index.aspx

They show the standard pickup truck stuff on there web page so you will have to call them.

If you sold plenty of that $5.00 corn then
I think they can get that 466 up to 600 to 800 HP. You could run circles around an 8010. Only problem is the 5 feet of fire coming out the exhaust pipe might set your field on fire.
 

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3-400 hp is in easy reach without much $$. Basically screw pump and 3LM turbo (which it may allreay have?)

I don't know if a MW pump will push that much fuel though, If you really want to get the fire lit you will need a "P" pump. And of course water injection to keep exhaust temps down.

Another problem I see is that to really build the HP you need to significantly up the RPMs. (well over 3000.) Pretty sure you'd shake the machine apart.

But your rubber band will be the next problem.

Good luck in what ever you're doing! Sounds kinda fun to build a "pullin" combine!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Quote:You need hypermax engineering. They have all the parts to make a tractor pull engine and the old international 466 engine is a favorite in the farm tractor class. Here is the site.

http://www.gohypermax.com/Index.aspx

They show the standard pickup truck stuff on there web page so you will have to call them.

If you sold plenty of that $5.00 corn then
I think they can get that 466 up to 600 to 800 HP. You could run circles around an 8010. Only problem is the 5 feet of fire coming out the exhaust pipe might set your field on fire.


To see that 5' fire out the exhaust, I would'nt care about loosing that field. The sight would be worth every penny.


Thanks very much for the info and link. I'll be looking and calling likely sometime this next week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Quote:3-400 hp is in easy reach without much $$. Basically screw pump and 3LM turbo (which it may allreay have?)

I don't know if a MW pump will push that much fuel though, If you really want to get the fire lit you will need a "P" pump. And of course water injection to keep exhaust temps down.

Another problem I see is that to really build the HP you need to significantly up the RPMs. (well over 3000.) Pretty sure you'd shake the machine apart.

But your rubber band will be the next problem.

Good luck in what ever you're doing! Sounds kinda fun to build a "pullin" combine!


Its not uncommon at all to have a 466 powered combine running at 2850 or better when the pump comes back from the "injection specialist"
...
In fact, thats how mine came back too. Unless you have an experienced pump guy with the application so they can set the governor correctly, you'll get the pump back with the gov setup for a truck. Then to get the rated power at the rated rpm, they up the high idle. Morons!!! I wish these companies would get a clue when they have an experienced guy in the shop, dont let him go. But, that's a story for a nother time.

I'm wanting to experiment with chopper designs for proper residue management. Or in my area, we call it straw management. To do this I need a little more power. The only drives that will really be effected are the pto and rotor drive. I run a belt pickup header, so that whole drive setup wont be effected.

Thanks.
 

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I cant see the engine lasting to long turning more RPMS but give it a try. I would try billet rods maybe bore it out a tad P pump is a must. Also look at Liquid to Air Intercooler i have seen major HP Gains with those. Also best beef up your head if you want to turn bigger Turbo water injection maybe not sure how well that would last in a constant speed application. Just look around the country at some Hot farm tractors running 750hp. some of those guys can turn that power @3000 Rpms
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Quote:I cant see the engine lasting to long turning more RPMS but give it a try. I would try billet rods maybe bore it out a tad P pump is a must. Also look at Liquid to Air Intercooler i have seen major HP Gains with those. Also best beef up your head if you want to turn bigger Turbo water injection maybe not sure how well that would last in a constant speed application. Just look around the country at some Hot farm tractors running 750hp. some of those guys can turn that power @3000 Rpms

It allready has the intercooler on it. I believe I read the HP was stated at 210? for these machines.

We have a 5488 tractor with the same engine, but has the old style rotary pump that with the factory seal still on it was turning 240 at rated rpm. I know there are several 466 truck engines running more than that. I dont know what the governed rpm limit is in the trucks, but it's likely over 3,000.

If it all works, I'll repower the machine with something larger.
 

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There is one HUGE difference between the pulling tractors and a combine, other than the obvious, and that is the conditions. The pulling tractor only has to put out max power for maybe a minute. A combine has to do it for hours. This makes for a very different set of parts.
For starters:
1. Put a pyrometer in the exhaust manifold before the turbo. Make sure it stays under 1250 deg F under full load. This keeps things from melting. It also helps to know if you get an injector stuck open, or seem to have low power. A pyrometer is actually a pretty good power gauge. In general, more heat means you're using more fuel & making more power. I can't stress the pyrometer enough. Make sure you do it before anything else.
2. Turn up the pump. If that don't give you enough fuel, take it to a performance shop. Tell them exactly what you are trying to do, and any specifications you need it to meet (speed at which to make rated power).
3. If that still isn't enough, get the injectors worked on. Extrude honing the injectors 10% over-size can gain quite a bit of power. IIRC, a 5.9 in a pickup gained ~75-120hp from EH injectors. Otherwise get them overhauled & built larger.
3. Turbo. Since the combine really doesn't worry about acceleration, there isn't much need for multiple turbochargers. If you get the injectors & pump worked on, you'll probably be moving too much fuel for the stock 'charger. This will be shown by back-pressure in the exhaust manifold. I have no clue what size turbo to look for.

Stock, brand new, highest rated DT466E is 300HP, 860ft-lb, 2400rpm governor. VGT & HPCR electronic injection.

Scheid Diesel in Indiana should be able to put that motor where you want it. They are a very popular source for pulling trucks & tractors. Injectors, pumps, turbos, etc. They do it all.
 

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That's the sticky part. The HPCR (High Pressure Common Rail) is a totally electronically controlled engine. The ECUs on the HPCR are usually bought from one of a few companies, Bosch being one of the more popular. To get more power out of a HPCR, you need to change the programming. A simple 'fuel box' (goes between a sensor & the ECU) will get some, but won't max out the engine.
The mechanical engine is a lot easier to make an intermediate amount of power on for a combine application. You really have 3 operating states:
1. Off (really easy to accomodate)
2. Low idle (still pretty easy to accomplish)
3. Full throttle, max power (the hard part)
As long as the engine transitions from one state to the other and back easily, it's good. An automobile has to operate smoothly at all conditions, which is where the HPCR shines (and costs).
1680 had 225HP new stock. So figure 75-90 horse with injector & pump work. (DON'T forget the pyrometer!!!) Any more than that and you'll probably need a bigger turbo.

Forgot to add; the new DT466E has EGR, so I'm 100% sure it must have an air-air cooler.
http://www.internationaldelivers.com/site_layout/engine/dt466detail.asp
 
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