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Research and understand what fertility each crop needs to produce X number of bushels. Grid sample your fields and run full analyst not just N, P, and K. Also understand what nutrients are mobile in your soils and what nutrients are immobile in your soils. Nitrogen is mobile in soil thus you shouldn't try to build residual levels. Phosphorus is immobile in soil and residual levels can be built. These are factors you can control but there is a big you can't, Mother Nature. Control what you can and set yourself up for success.
 

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Have access to manure from anywhere? That is like instant soil profile and organic matter. If you plan on just building through continuous cropping and spreading the straw you've got a long process ahead of you. My dad and I have finally got some land turned around, through continuous cropping, and minimum tillage seeding, and it's taken years. We still have some land that used to historically oats, with the straw baled and then summerfallowed, and I still feel like it isn't where I would like it to be compared to the other land.
I second that. On the worst areas of our grey wooded soils, the only thing that they really respond to is copious amounts of manure. Or peat moss. I need to get some level of OM built up first, otherwise more fertilizer is just good money after bad ( unless the stars align and rainfall is just perfect).
 

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What is your organic matter %, my guess would be that is your issue. Find manure, biowaste, keep roots growing/living 365 days & intensively graze it, these are the ways to build organic matter. No till, direct seeding and leaving the straw on the land helps but will not build organic matter quick enough. Also, there was a comment about anhydrous ammonia burning out carbon, not sure so can't say. All I do know is any land we have taken over that anhydrous was the nitrogen source for years has taken us much longer to get the carbon cycling (increased microbial activity) and the land releasing nutrients that are tied up. There will be those that will say I am full of it and that is fine, they have not experienced what we as a farm have experienced over the last 12 seasons. Haven't seen enough to have an opinion between urea or UAN as main nitrogen source.
 

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Purchased land a few years back that was close to me but farmed very poorly from its early days of cultivation..

dint think I would do it again, spend the extra money when decent land come
Up and look for that, a poor soil structure with low organic takes decades to get back, 5-10 years I don’t think will get it back
 

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"In aerobic decomposition, living organisms, which use oxygen, feed upon the organic matter. They use the nitrogen, phosphorus, some of the carbon, and other required nutrients. Much of the carbon serves as a source of energy for the organisms and is burned up and respired as carbon dioxide (C02). Since carbon serves both as a source of energy and as an element in the cell protoplasm, much more carbon than nitrogen is needed. Generally about two-thirds of carbon is respired as C02, while the other third is combined with nitrogen in the living cells. However, if the excess of carbon over nitrogen (C:N ratio) in organic materials being decomposed is too great, biological activity diminishes. Several cycles of organisms are then required to burn most of the carbon."

Decomposition of Organic Matter

Dumping excess nitrogen to the soil helps eat up organic matter much faster as the microbes use it as well in decomposition, key term is excess, you can use too much. Also goes the same for too much organic matter and not enough free nitrogen.

I am eagerly awaiting the results of a marginal piece of land in the area that got absolutely stuffed full with big city manure injection. It is part of the City of Edmontons Bio Solids disposal program. For about a week there was a never ending line of semis full of Bio solids trucked from edmontons waste management facilities. This year we will see if the farmer gets a Bum-per crop out of it, or is just picking stringed cotton out of his seed drill.

My guess is his most invasive weed this year is tomatoes.
 

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we bought some land back in 2015 with super poor soil nutrient levels. sorry to bring the bad news but it's costly to get production up on land with poor levels. Best thing to look for is manure, when not available, grow crops that do well with poor nutrient levels.
we've noticed with this land that it will always yield less even though it looks better than our owned land. After harvest we take our amazon spreader and dump an extra 100 lbs of 11-52 on and work it in. its a cost that came with the land, lesson learned but ya it will take 10+ years to build soil nutrients and it comes with a cost. Some guys here that rent a lot of land and lose it due to the owner selling have been mining the soil badly. some guys including us were shocked how much money it took to get it back up in nutrient levels.

don't bale the straw or burn it. also watch how much nutrients you put in seed row, sometimes too much is not good either. when soil building, fall is the time, phos, k sulphur is cheap in fall, take a spreader or your airdrill and scratch it in.
1 rule
3/1 phos to nitrogen ratio. don't think you can buy a crop with nitrogen that's a myth.
 

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All that’s great till it won’t rain:cry:
 

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Have you thought about a humate product? We have seen in some of our poorer land a real bump from a humate based seed treatment and it only cost us around $1/acre, might be worth a shot.
 

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Have you thought about a humate product? We have seen in some of our poorer land a real bump from a humate based seed treatment and it only cost us around $1/acre, might be worth a shot.
Im dropping some humate product as we speak.
Once a year the **** truck comes and hauls it out. Have not noticed a huge difference but I could change my diet up I suppose
 
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Im dropping some humate product as we speak.
Once a year the **** truck comes and hauls it out. Have not noticed a huge difference but I could change my diet up I suppose
[/QUOTE]
What is it and where are you getting it from?
 

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Im dropping some humate product as we speak.
Once a year the **** truck comes and hauls it out. Have not noticed a huge difference but I could change my diet up I suppose
What is it and where are you getting it from?
[/QUOTE]

....Dude I was taking a dump:LOL:
 
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I wouldn’t get to worked up on mined land. We’ve found a well rounded bag of groceries in the year applied gets you damn close to owned land. So close we’ve abandoned the thought of building nutrient levels.

And what are the chances that if you did this on a summer fallowed field it would mysteriously be a record setting yield? There are a lot of ongoing geological processes regarding mineralization and plant yields that conflict with various ideologies.
 

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And what are the chances that if you did this on a summer fallowed field it would mysteriously be a record setting yield? There are a lot of ongoing geological processes regarding mineralization and plant yields that conflict with various ideologies.
Well it’s funny you should ask!
That’s exactly what happened on about 5000 acres when it was to wet to seed. Summer fallowed black for the season.
70 bushel canola all around next crop. Some of this land testing 5ppm Phos.
Why couldn’t that year been $18+ a bushel!
 
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