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Ok so we have just purchased a half section of land up against a body of water covering approximately 300 acres. We have another 1/4 that is also up against this body of water. We have approximately 160 acres under water. I should mention that this "slough" was dry from 1988 till 2004 or 05. We grew some great crops on this land through those years, in 02 it was the only field we combined. Anyway I am wondering if anyone else has done any irrigation out of similar sort of body of water? An irrigation equipment company has claimed that they have set up similar irrigation projects in eastern Saskatchewan. We have 200 acres we could irrigate easily and another 100 could be done with some cat work. I do know one guy that did a similar sort of thing 30 plus years ago and from what I heard the body of water was sucked dry in two years. With the price land now that wouldn't be so bad either. I know zero about irrigating. Am I crazy to be thinking this might be feasable? Any thoughts? I am in NW sask
 

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I have a similar set up. Works well in a dryer year. In a wetter year it just makes the plants sick/diseased and reduces yield.

How do you plan to suck from the deepest part? I buried pipe to the outside and put in a small 3' culvert down to supply pipe.

Make sure you choose a fuel source that doesn't cost much in the years you don't use it.
 

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Ok so we have just purchased a half section of land up against a body of water covering approximately 300 acres. We have another 1/4 that is also up against this body of water. We have approximately 160 acres under water. I should mention that this "slough" was dry from 1988 till 2004 or 05. We grew some great crops on this land through those years, in 02 it was the only field we combined. Anyway I am wondering if anyone else has done any irrigation out of similar sort of body of water? An irrigation equipment company has claimed that they have set up similar irrigation projects in eastern Saskatchewan. We have 200 acres we could irrigate easily and another 100 could be done with some cat work. I do know one guy that did a similar sort of thing 30 plus years ago and from what I heard the body of water was sucked dry in two years. With the price land now that wouldn't be so bad either. I know zero about irrigating. Am I crazy to be thinking this might be feasable? Any thoughts? I am in NW sask
Is the land you intend to water have any sand in the profile or drain good? Guys north of lloydminster irrigated the waste water from the city for years. They might still do. Most of that land is sandy and can stand that amount of water. Any kind of clay and poorish drainage is a recipe for disaster in a cold summer. Pm me and I'll give you a name or two if interested.
 

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I have a similar set up. Works well in a dryer year. In a wetter year it just makes the plants sick/diseased and reduces yield.
:sFun_explosive:f
How do you plan to suck from the deepest part? I buried pipe to the outside and put in a small 3' culvert down to supply pipe.

Make sure you choose a fuel source that doesn't cost much in the years you don't use it.
There Is a dugout on the edge of the body of water. I have not thought of a fuel source, I was thinking diesel.
 

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Is the land you intend to water have any sand in the profile or drain good? Guys north of lloydminster irrigated the waste water from the city for years. They might still do. Most of that land is sandy and can stand that amount of water. Any kind of clay and poorish drainage is a recipe for disaster in a cold summer. Pm me and I'll give you a name or two if interested.
It's on heavier land with good drainage.
 

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It's on heavier land with good drainage.
I'm I heavy ground. Know of one farmer that irrigated some land late 80's? Turned it on once since new. Do you loose much yield to lack of water or loose more yield from too much water? Might have money better spent elsewhere if you chasing only a few bushels. What's your annual rainfall/crops?
 

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Do you have water rights for it? I think if you own every area surrounding it you still need water rights to irrigate out of it.
This was one of my main questions, no we don't own all the land this water is touching. Who would I contact to find out if I can even use this water?
 

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I'm I heavy ground. Know of one farmer that irrigated some land late 80's? Turned it on once since new. Do you loose much yield to lack of water or loose more yield from too much water? Might have money better spent elsewhere if you chasing only a few bushels. What's your annual rainfall/crops?
I would say we lose more yield to lack of moisture then to much. But the last few years it has been minimal. We grow wheat, canola, peas, and barley. I would not be opposed to putting alfalfa in, it can use a lot more water then an annual crop.
 

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Kinda depends where you are as well. Water rules vary all over the place, DU might pay you decent money to keep it a wetland.

300 acres is not allot of water if it's shallow so you'd want to keep your overhead low as possible. We irrigate out of a basin that's over a hundred acres with one 850gpm pivot and that water is gone in a couple weeks, we have several gas wells on that field so we still benefit during dry years as leases are being paid based on irrigated land.
 

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I've done this on a piece of my ground that floods every once in a while. It's about 40 acres under water and the most I got out of it was 21 days around the clock with a half mile of wheels. Use propane to pump, it's cheap enough fuel and the engines are cheaper to rebuild than diesel. Wheel lines are also cheap and abundant. Around Lethbridge they mostly go for scrap now. If the land is usually farmed I wouldn't bother asking for permission, there's always someone that will say you shouldn't but at the end of the day it's your land. First time we did it Ducks Unlimited questioned it but when told that the land had been seeded for the past 30 years they backed off.
 

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If you do end up irrigating I would definitely get a river screen.

I used it in Tennessee and the suction line never plugged up.

Totally worth the cost, IMO.
 
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