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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are looking to go twin row here on our farm and was just wondering if its worth it?? I have heard people say they cant tell a diffrence in yields and i have heard some say they seen a 10-20 bushel increase?? What are yall thoughts on this and what kind of twin row planter would you get? Thanks
 

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I have had two crops in twins now and I have had a lot of benefits from it. Ex. It seems to make it 3-4 days further into hot and dry weather before the leaves curl up vs 30" and seems to hang on a lot better in a light frost, yields have had a nice bump especially in a more variable year.
 

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There isn't much research that shows yield increases. The further north the more likely you are to get one. Similar to 20" rows. I have never tried it but the ability to handle light frosts better would maybe make it worth it here
 

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We are in a drier area and we have been able to bring up populations without loosing the stalk strength, I agree it would be similar to 20" but the extra 2" helps a lot getting the sprayer and top dressing equipment threw it and narrow row heads are heavy and expensive, if I had the means I would plant 12" corn. Narrower the rows the better the canopy witch improves drought tolerance, weed control, better use of sunlight, more room to grow, leaves for better use of nutrients available. The twin row is a nice way to move to narrower rows with out changing the corn head.
 

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I know a guy who plants twin row corn with a Salford air drill that is on 7.5 in spacing. He does this guy plugging two rows, seeding two 7.5 in apart rows. Then he is able to harvest with a 30" spacing corn head. Interesting use of twin rows. Other corn in this area is planted with sugar beet planters on 22 in spacing.
 

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Pioneer corn blows, but I believe I have gained 10-12%, I know it sounds high but it is how you go about it, if you don't change population you are probably wasting you're time. It's the ability to jump the population about 25% of norm, get a little poor weather and the norm 30" and it will fall apart and the twins pull right through
 
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With increased stalk quality, root mass and a larger area for nutrient uptake you will see less blown over, damaged crops.

If it is a staggered pattern like a Monosem you will see a more uniform canopy with a nice spacing for air flow and sunlight penetration.

We actually see a lot of growers going to twin row for both corn and beans,
 

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I will agree that certain areas some companies will perform better than others.

Year in and year out I have the best luck with Pioneer, more consistant. It may not be the highest yielding, but it is close. It also doesn't seem to fall out of bed in a bad year like some other companies. At least that is the way it works in my fields and my area.
 

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I know you won't believe me so this is a waste of time but I'm actually offended by your last post.

Dad's been a Pioneer sales rep for 30+ years. I've been there doing yield trials my whole farming career, putting the plots in and all that stuff.

Never once have we skewed our data. We never mess with the competitors or lie. Proof of that is look at recent soybean plot data. Pioneer beans have been weak for the last few years, since the 90M01's were popular. All our published plot data shows the 24-10 and 25-10 and Northstars yielding higher than the 90Y71's and 90Y01's and such we have of late.

It's not fun publishing losing data but if you lose, you lose. Your post insinuating Pioneer sales reps skew their data in their favor to make a sale is disgusting.

Maybe in your area that's how things operate but we don't work that way. We've thrown away plots because they couldn't get harvested the same day because the combine broke. We felt it was unfair to combine the last few varieties a couple of days later because of the change in conditions. The moisture would not be accurate, wind or animals may have knocked plants down and it wasn't fair.

That all being said, judging from your other posts around this forum, I'm sure you'll have some smartass comment but I get mad when I watch people do their very best to provide accurate information for farmers, then farmers turn around and make comments like yours.
jcalder, I applaud you for your efforts to keep your data honest. Cheating on plot data helps no one in the end.

That being said, I've seen with my own eyes what SWFarmService describes from a Pioneer rep. I've seen hybrids that beat Pioneer hybrids left out of published results altogether. That to me is worse than just screwing with the numbers. For this reason, I don't trust any plot data that comes from someone I don't know. Does it happen by other seed company reps? I'm sure it does. When a dollar is involved, some people will do anything to get it.

In full disclosure, I sell Channel. I've beat Pioneer and I've been beaten by Pioneer. Either way, I publish the full plot.
 

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To get back on track jegfarms103, what's your climate, general area in the us or Canada, and what kind of yield do you raise corn at currently in 30's? If you're in western nd for instance and raising 130 bu consistently year in and year out you change a lot of things, tillage, fert, and varieties, and doing a perfect job planting to name a few,before you ever have to think of changing row widths. I think the cheapest thing you could do, but sometimes the hardest to do is plant perfect, as in you plant 32k and you finish with 32k harvestable ears, and being honest with yourself in counting ears.
 

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Couldn't have said this better myself.

Dad has always said honesty is the best policy. If other people want to leave plots out, change the numbers in their favor, whatever then so be it. But anyone, anytime, anywhere can come watch us do our plots and "watch the scale". We have nothing to hide.
Yours is the type of data I like!

that said....in real world conditions, would you not cut the ripe beans before the green ones....do you adjust the combine while harvesting a plot? In real world you adjust when you change varieties. do you go the same ground speed throughout the plot? I change ground speed when harvesting fields. I realize the reason for all of these for consistency, but it actually can change the results a little, and depending on the size of the plot, a little is a lot! My biggest beef is the change of variety names so often, that I can't try them a couple years to see how it works, My yields have dropped the past few years. Don't know if it is just the climate or not, but I stopped doing on farm research for about 5 years ago!

I wish there were more people in my area that did on farm trials, as I believe when they are done on farm, they are more relevant for my farm! Keep up the good honest work, it should benefit you in the long run!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Were in the eastern part of the US...we average around 170 across the board on a good year and may see number higher than that..we are looking at a great plains 2020p which is a drill type planter but uses finger pickup..Looked all over the web and yield data charts and 38,000 with the perfect skip seems to be the best. but to get the skip right is what is bothering me....u need to have each seed 6.5" apart to be perfect???? just trying to get some ideas of what i need to do and what not to do. Thanks guys for the help
 

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Were in the eastern part of the US...we average around 170 across the board on a good year and may see number higher than that..we are looking at a great plains 2020p which is a drill type planter but uses finger pickup..Looked all over the web and yield data charts and 38,000 with the perfect skip seems to be the best. but to get the skip right is what is bothering me....u need to have each seed 6.5" apart to be perfect???? just trying to get some ideas of what i need to do and what not to do. Thanks guys for the help
I'm not sure I completely understand you're question, perfect skip? You mean seed spacing?
 

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If you are looking at Great Plains twin row, you should go to their website. you can find the manuals online for the planter you are looking at. I'm not sure about the first few years, but they eventually had a way to time the rows for proper stagger. Very easy once you understand. If the planter you are looking at doesn't have the timing marks, I'm sure you can update, but it will be expensive, if you have questions about it you can call them on their service line and they are very helpful, probably can check the sn number of the unit you are looking at and tell you if it was after the timing mark changes happened. I like their air pro meters....like white but better, but I don't like their row units as well as white!
 
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