The Combine Forum banner

1 - 20 of 77 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
437 Posts
is macaroni worth it

i dont think square bales would stay!
why no hopper extentions on that combine?
where is the truck/btrains...sidehill cart?
serious now
how do they seed,spray,prework,...
somewhere on youtube is a selfpropelled round baler 4x4 crawling a hill but the bale would take out the house at bottom if ejected... i have hills but not these problems
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I have hilly terrain up to 45% slope.

we pack the straw with rotropressa jd premium
throw us the herbicides with the leveling rods 12 14 meters
we throw the fertilizer spreader
we also sow with wheeled or crawler tractors iron
collect the grain up to 42% with the john deere t560al that you have not

the truck is usually on the sideline or on the road
the trailer and we go with the grain

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,773 Posts
Wow that is amazing, another thing would be it would almost have to rain every night the exact right amount to prevent washout or drying out. Expensive equipment, extra fuel etc, betcha they're getting more than $5 a bushel for wheat or barley :).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
we unfortunately there 'but there is the plain' the hill even at 45%.
The lower wheel with 480 65 r 28 r 65 600 and 38, we go up to 35%, higher than most big and no, because it overturned.

if you work up and down when it rains are problems.

I also collect pictures of the hill pending
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
Can you see the main difference between those combines and ones in Canada???

They actually use the seat belts! Always wondered what those were for!!!:D:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
Those are some hills, but on that second video with the New Holland I would have cut a backlash at the bottom. In other words instead of going to the bottom of the hill into the hole as we call them here, I would leave a patch at the bottom to be cut later and follow the contour of the hill better so one does not have to go down to the bottom and then pull up to the next ridge and turn on it at the same time spinning out in the process. This would keep the machine from pulling up hill on the steepest part of the hill alot. We have a steep hill not as long as that, but we always start at the middle going across the hill, turn down hill and come up the lowest part to the hill taking the next swath farther up the hill, but there is almost no climbing up the hill high up on the hillside, but close to the bottom. It is pretty much staight across the slope.
Those European combines are so Narrow, even the 1960's era IH combines we have had at least a 12 foot width. and the 1470 is about 20 ft wide at the wheels. I can't believe how much backing up is done going up those hills. Looks very dangerous with all that weight hanging so high in the air. My dad always liked the IH brakes on the hillside combines in the old days as they were on the wheel rather than on the transmission so if a drive line broke you still had brakes on the wheels. Especially important before Hydrostatic drive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,773 Posts
Ya I can see brakes and axles being quite important here :). Are these combines all automatic leveling? The rear axles on those units sure look flimsy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
I'm sure they are all automatic. Probably use mercury switches controlled by fluid flow in the sensor system. It wouldn't be possible to drive combines that way without automatic levelling. It's hard especially in a cab to tell how level you are and level it yourself. early self propelled combines in the US with levellers used to be hand levelled by the operator. The Harris out of California had the header controls and side levelling controls on the same leveller. Many had a small carpenters type level in front of the operator so he could see how level he was. No rear levelling.
Early pull type levelling combines in the American west some of which were built in the late 1800s had one man on the pull type combine to level it, one to "punch" lift and lower header on the side of the combine and a machine man to watch the machine and oil bearings and chains ( wooded framed combines some of which were ground driven) as well as one or two sackers. These were for very large farms.
 
1 - 20 of 77 Posts
Top