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Is it due to emission standards that when I hit the throttle on 7010(idle to full)
it takes 5 sec or more to get to full RPM's? Can anything be done to speed this up?
 

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Is 5 seconds out of your day really going to matter? It probably has something to do with the electronics. If an engine immediately went to full blast from idle it could cause some extreme stress in the engine and in other parts.
 

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I know what you mean with the delay, our 7010 is slow to rev up as well and our elevation is only1400ft. As for delay in all electronic engines well I cant pick a delay in our C15 C16 Cats or our Toyotas.
 

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I agree I really like our 7010's but hate the slow winding up and both smoke like a freight train don't know how they can be better on emmissions than the cummins. They do not have any power at idle or mid idle and smoke terrible at half throttle, once they get wound up they have real good power
 

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Check with the dealer... On Cat Et we can change throttle delay with a laptop.... Thats not emmisions related its so when you put the machine in gear and speed it up its not all at once- a modulated engagement.
 

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Slow rpm increase is usually related to the size of the turbo compared to the displacement of your engine. A larger turbo requires more pressure to get up to speed, which means you need more exhaust flow to really get it going, resulting in a period of time where even though you "floor it" you do not get instant power. This is also known as "turbo lag".

Some solutions for this problem and a possible explanation for why some of your other engines do not have this issue:

- variable turbo (usually the vanes turn), closes vanes which speeds up the turbo even with low exhaust flow. Hard to configure for manufacturer though, and expensive. Very effective.
- using more than one turbo rather than one big turbo. Or using a small one and a big one where the small one has a "spill" valve to the bigger.

Altitude is also related to this problem because to actually burn your diesel you need about a ratio of at least 15 oxygen: 1 diesel. Obviously, if you are at a high altitude there is less oxygen in the air and thus it's even harder for the engine to start revving up. Most engines run at 30:1 ratios rather than that 15:1 though (numbers might be off, it's been a while since i worked on this).

Remember that smoke is caused by less-than-optimal burning process and is a waste of fuel
 
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