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Discussion Starter #1
What would a 4960 be worth with a blown engine? It has 9000 hrs, but doesn't have duals. The tires only have about 30-40% tread left. On a scale of 1-10, this tractor would be about a 5 or 6.
How long do the powershift transmissions usually last before they need to have some serious cash stuck in them?
And lastly, will a 466 from a 7720 combine fit a 4960. Or are they 2 different engines?
 

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Well, here's my thoughts.

9000 hrs.--- high hours
blown motor---- $$$$
no duals ----- $$$$
rear tires 30-40%----- soon to be $$$$
tranny condition might not be far behind motor----- more $$$$
I am assuming it has MFWD---- might need attention $$$$

So, with that, I would say 12-15 thousand. Maybe, just maybe, up to 18K depending on overall condition. I don't know if I would offer more than that. Kind of hard to say without seeing in person. Is the cab in decent shape? Oil leaks? Lot of factors. You could put a motor in it and be fine for years. Who knows.

I have heard people putting combine motors into tractors. But most are motors out of 8820's--- 200 to 225 HP. 7720's were rated somewhere around 165 or so. I would go for an 8820 motor to get the power output of where that tractor used to be. I believe you would have to change the oil pan for sure. Not real sure about what else.
 

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A 8820 has a 466 engine and the 4960 is a 7.6, the 7.6 has a water pump that is driven from the engine, the fuel injection is different, it is a different engine. I have put a alot of different engines in old John Deeres, but it never really worked ok.
 

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Man, looks similar to our old 88 when we bought it. That tractor has been out in the sun it's whole life. Is everything there to put it back together? Why didn't the person that owns it fix it? I assume that the front weights are the ones behind the tractor? Do you know the guy that owns it? Shady or honest? How long has that tractor been sitting there? The oil leaks on the rear of the tractor aren't that big of a deal. The ones under the tractor are the ones that are a big deal. A potential split job. If the guy wants to sell it, you might get it even cheaper if you point out the uncertainty of not knowing what else could be wrong besides the motor. I still don't know if I would go over 15K for it. High hours, potential parts missing, uncertainty of other problems(if motor is blown, is tranny next, rearend? How abused is it?), no duals, tires worn, weathered, cab condition, oil leaks, etc... all legit problems. The worse you make it sound, and no other potential buyers, could get you an even better deal.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Most tractors around here don't get put under a shed. There are only a few farmers that have sheds to store their stuff. From what I gather, the tractor didn't get fixed because the farmer was fixing to quit farming. Everything that was taken off is around the tractor. So there shouldn't be any missing parts. They started to take it apart but after pulling the oil pan, decide to sell it. The mechanic said the block is ruined. There are a few spun main bearings and line boring it would do no good. So I'm looking at atleast buying a short block if not a whole complete engine.
The only oil leaks were in the back, around the engine, and by the left front axle.
I'm thinking about offering $10000 if they have the duals and $8000 if not.
 

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Quote:Most tractors around here don't get put under a shed. There are only a few farmers that have sheds to store their stuff. From what I gather, the tractor didn't get fixed because the farmer was fixing to quit farming. Everything that was taken off is around the tractor. So there shouldn't be any missing parts. They started to take it apart but after pulling the oil pan, decide to sell it. The mechanic said the block is ruined. There are a few spun main bearings and line boring it would do no good. So I'm looking at atleast buying a short block if not a whole complete engine.
The only oil leaks were in the back, around the engine, and by the left front axle.
I'm thinking about offering $10000 if they have the duals and $8000 if not.


Sounds pretty fair to me. Your the one taking the risk, so I think that sounds about right. They might think they have gold and say no, but who else is going to offer that much for something in that shape? Let them stew on it for a while. After they have it for another few months and it's eating a hole in their pocketbook by just sitting there, they might think twice about it and take your offer. Plus it gives you a bit to reevaluate it or find something better.
 

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Quote:Here are some pics of the 4960 I'm looking at







Unbelievable!!! You would never see a tractor like that, in that kind of shape in my area. I can't believe anyone would let a tractor like that get into the condition that it is in. I would say its from quality work/operation either as much as I would say abuse.

The 4960 MFWD is an excellent tractor. Many of them came out of the factory pushing 40-50hp beyond what was rated in its literature. We bought a pair back in '91 I think and they each had around 255hp.
 

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I agree, looks pretty rough.
No more then $10.000. Spun bearings-why? Waterpump went out??
That one looks like it could be a money pit.

Had 2 of those at one time. One went only to 8100 hrs when one of the liners gave way due to being pitted from antifreze cavitation.
We had gotten it used with 3000 or so hrs.
Traded it at 9200 hrs.

The other one had 15.000 hrs when it was traded. Never had been touched but the engine was headed south in a hurry on it.
Everything on the 3 point was completely worn out. Never pulled anything in the drawbar much, it still looked new.

Good tractors overall.



edit: Transmissions should run to maybe 15.000 hrs or more depending on care. By then the C2 clutch pack is usually worn out.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well, we ended up buying the 4960. Now I need to know the best way to steer it without the engine running. I'll have to pull it about 200ft and make 3 turns to get it to where it can be loaded on a trailer. Any suggestions?
 

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Use the 4850 thats there to pull it and steer it with the forward momentum. If you can get it rolling, you should be able to steer it. At least I believe you can. Just take it easy so that you can take rests from trying to steer it.
 

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I ones helped move a burned out combine - we hooked up a draw bar and pulled it with a tractor. Used the tractor hydraulics to steer the combine, by connecting hoses from tractor outlets directly into the supply and drain on the steering orbitrol/ rotating valve on the steering column on the combine.

That should be possible to do as well with the 4960, but maybe too much work if your not going that far...

We towed the combine about 25 miles that way...

- Peter
 

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If you don't have to make too sharp of a turn you can kind of turn the wheels with the steering wheel. Takes lot's of turns of the st wheel though.

4960 don't have steering cylinders to hook into. Or best I remeber they don't.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
So if I turn the wheel, I should get some steering? I know I can do this with our 4010 but I wasn't sure about the 4960. I don't remember the 4960 having steering cylinders, although I think the 4850 MFWD's do.
 

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We pull dead tractors around the shop all the time. Just pull them and turn like heck on the steering wheel for steering. The tractor will turn, for no farther than you are going, but it just takes a lot of work!! Once you get the tractor going pretty good, it doesn't turn too bad. The faster you go the easier it will be to turn, just have to be really careful. Don't stop it though, it makes it almost impossible to turn.
 

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Aah - they have those steering cylinders that are built into the center of the front axle... Well if that's the case, I don't know how easy the hydr. ports are to get to, but still they should be there, somewhere...

I'm not sure whether you were referring to dutch's or my comment - I wasn't talking about hooking up to the steering cylinders - I was talking about hooking up to the steering "orbitrol" as we call it over here in DK. It's the rotational valve that's mechanically connected to the steering column and steering wheel. It has 4 ports + 1 additional drainage port sometimes. 1 port for feeding oil from the pump, 1 port for returning oil to the tank (at some point) and the last 2 ports goes to the steering cylinder - in this case probably integrated into the front axle, but still - 1 port for oil pressure for the right side and the other for oil pressure to the left side.

If you hook up the work hydraulic outlets from the tow tractor to the steering valve on the 4960 - 1 hose on the pressure side and 1 hose on the return - you can steer the 4960 by using its own steering wheel while towing. (2 man job: 1 towing and 1 in the 4960) Just remember that the tow tractor must leave the hydraulics on ALL THE TIME while driving! Might get a bit too exiting, pretty fast...
(been there, done that...)

And one last thing - keeping everything connected to hydraulics absolutely clean is essential!!

Hope that helped

- Peter
 
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