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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all! I'm taking delivery of a new to me 9500 with just 2700 sep. hours on it. Can any of you guys tell me what to look for or share some experiences you've had with your 9500's. A lot of gleaner guys are telling me it won't clean as good as my old gleaner would.
 

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No personal experiences, I have a 7720 Titan 2 but I have a few neighbors with 9500's and they love them. Corn, soybeans and wheat go through them and they don't have any complaints against the cleaning.. Honestly if I ever upgrade I'd be looking for a nice 9500
 

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go to your local dealer and get a winter inspection form. it will be a good way to learn the combine.
 

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I'm going on the third season with the 9500 and we're happy with it. I put a set of Trellborg radials on it last year and that really smoothed out the ride. If the sample isn't what it should be, start inspecting for worn rub bars or a damaged concave. Also check the concave for level. There's no reason why it shouldn't give good performance, it's a tried and true formula.
 

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Keep an eye on the engine temp gauge. In windy conditions trash can build up on the radiator. If you see temp rising, just open the radiator door and scrape the trash off with your fingers. I always blew my radiator out every night, but in barley, trash could build up 3 times a day if it was windy.

There is a warning buzzer, but it's got to be better if you can pick it up before it gets that hot.

This goes against the manual, but I was told to aim to get a clean sample with the pre-cleaner fully closed (in cereals), and then gradually open it up until the sample got a little dirty, then close it a fraction. This gets a bit of extra capacity out of the sieves, but mostly your capacity is limited by the walkers.

While on walkers, there are several threads about it if you want to do a search, but to keep it short, use plenty of grease if they are the greasable type, or switch to wooden blocks which will be more reliable and hassle free.

They're a good honest machine. I think I only had three bearings fail in 4000 hours on ours. With correct lubrication, it's mainly belts, chains and sprockets to keep an eye on.
 

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A few years ago when working for Deere I replaced I don't know how many rear main seals in 9600s and 9500s. Pull the flywheel housing plug and if it is wet, replace the seal. The housing is sealed and you won't know it until fills enough to break the seal some were and find oil running down your combine. Easiest to pull the engine to do this. Was a good 8hr job for me. I would say over 80% of the combines I checked got a new rear main seal.
 

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You have a good combine. Reliable and fairly easy to service. There is a grease zirk in behind the header drive pumpover the front left axle. Found it the hard way, changing it was even worse. Other than that we really only had trouble with keeping it cool, which Chompy already outlined for you.

If you ever plug the beater on that sucker, don't hesitate to just drop the grate with the single bolts on each side, climb in on top of the walkers to clear it. If it's real stuck take a cordless drill and a half" bit or a spade bit. Build yourself a wrench to fit in the slots on the cylinder pully.
 

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Yea.... I've had more trouble with the beater than the cylinder with wet wads. I don't run the cylinder too wide open in canola anymore, that leaves more room to drop the concave and clear it. I've thought about the aftermarket beater kits but haven't tried one yet. It's probably not a recommended practice from a safety perspective, but I have cleared the beater of green buckwheat stalks with an electric chainsaw. Also jack up the back end and check your back wheel bearings for extra play at least once or twice a season... they've been known to lose a back wheel occasionally. We lost one on a hillside the second day out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks a lot guys for all your experience and advice. That means a lot. Its things like you all listed above that you can't get from a service manual. It should be here by the end of the week. I'll keep you guys posted on how it goes.
 

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We've had two 9500s for as long as I can remember until we traded one on a 9760 this year, I've learned some things over the years. Replace the clear rubber band rotary screen drive belt at least every other year. Ours always seemed to break on the hottest days and the engine would over heat. It's not fun to change either, brute strength is about the only method. Make sure your rasp bars and concave are in good shape and take the time to level the concave. It makes a world of difference in small grains. We also tried concave closure plates (AH130465) and they added capacity in barley and wheat. The better they thrash the less grain gets up on the walkers. A good upgrade is to install the JD beater slow down kit in reverse to speed the beater up 25% or so, we saw a gain in capacity from that modification. Also I like to run a lot of walker risers, about six on each walker staggered side to side, and lift the rear end by putting the axle in the lower holes. They are great machines and unbelievably reliable, just grease it every day and check the chains and oil. As far as cleaning grain they do a great job, so clean it makes you wonder what's going out the back, but ours never lost grain over the sieves just the walkers. We run a 25 foot head and it's a great combo. Good luck
 

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I'm running a 925 header on a 9500 and was curious if anyone knew how many RPMs I should be running the header at?
You should run your feeder house drive pulley to the slowest it will
go. That is just right. Any faster you will overspeed your knife drive
wobble box and shake it apart.
 
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