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Hello, I'm Blake and I'm kinda new to this forum so please bare with me. My family farms in the Texas panhandle and we have a 2005 model 9760 from heck! We have had nothing but problems with this combine. We operated this combine in wheat and the electric clutch on the front gearbox went out. This caused us to have to have the reverser, varible speed pully rebuilt and the electric clutch replaced.
We also used this machine on about 1600 acres of corn. All during corn harvest their was at least one code that came up about some sort of fuel delivery problem, or rail pressure problem. With no warning the combine will lose power. We have had our local John Deere mechanic come out and put a computer on our combine and he could not find anything wrong with it.
I was just wondering if someone else out there has had any problems with a 9760 losing power as well and what they did to correct it. Thanks!
 

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i would drain fuel tank and take that little filter off the end that i screwed up in the tank that is know to give problems. i have had alot of these plug up and that is were problem is at so when tank is low finish draining tank and remove it and trough it away.
 

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Hi
Do you know the code number and what engine is this a 8.1 or 9.0 liter. Will this happen after it has been at idle, if you shut the key off and start back up will it go away, any smoke when this happens. Anything you can tells us will help.
 

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I heard from a 9660 owner to check the filter in the sediment bowl. He had low power issues and they changed the fuel filters but no improvement. The called a dealer and the tech hooked the computer up. Nothing found. Suffered for a while and called another dealer. Tech asked if they cleaned the screen in the sediment bowl, which they had not. Took it out, blew it off with a the air compressor and the hp returned to normal.
 

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We had a similar problem on our brand new 9870, turns out there was something in the tank from the factory, maybe something plastic from when the tank was made. We took the line off at the sediment bowl and took an air blow gun and shot air up that hose to clear the blockage in the bottom of the tank. We were aware at the time that whatever was blocking was still in the tank but it worked for a week and we had todo it once again, but it got us through the season. We will have to drain the tank and take the valve out of the bottom of the tank in winter to get it sorted out.
 

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It's not a 94.17 code by chance is it??? I've had a few issues in corn with a 6.8 9560 six row head. That code is supposed to only apply to start up, but returns while engine is running even when cleared. I'll try the sediment bowl as you guys said.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
We removed fuel line from the sediment bowl and fuel flowed freely, so the screenin the bottom of the tank wasn't the problem. We cleaned the sediment bowl and have changed the fuel filters numerous times during the season. Our mechanic also replaced a wiring harness that goes on top of the valves to the injectors at the begining of corn harvest and that helped the combine run smother, but not the hp issue. I was wondering if the injectors are possibly in need of repair as in stoped up or something? I'm not much of a diesel mechanic.
Another topic about these combines is that they chunk corn out of the back of the rotor very easily with no warning. We personaly never had the problem, but a friend of ours did constantly! Has anyone else had this problem. How many bu. per hour were some of you able to get with say a 12 row header in 18% moisture.
 

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not sure if this could be the problem but we run a 03 9750 and had the same sort of problem last year. dealer hooked computer up and tried for hours to find the problem. we tried endless things and could not figure it out. It turns out that the problem was caused by a little check-valve thing in one of the fuel lines. There are 2 or 3 on our combine and after we replaced them all the problem was solved. they are about an inch in diameter and 3 inches long. aparently the little rubber inside turns sideways and causes trouble.
 

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This is very common to rotor combines. I have posted about rotor loss already years ago.
Mark Underwood, the inventor of the bi-rotor combine (www.ralfmeister.com/birotor.htm) calls this the "rifle effect".
Instead of falling through the separator grates the corn kernel joins in the spin of the rotor and gets literally screwed out of the back. There is no straight solution to this, because the effect depends on the shape of the kernel, the moisture and the temperature. With the wide varieties of corn these days, the conditions will vary greatly for everyone.

First of all, put the corn spacers in. Combines which are spect from the factory as "corn machines" have those along but not installed. If you stand at the left side of the combine and have the rear plastic covers removed, look at the separator grates, where they are bolted to the top rail. (Don't forget to remove the separator grate covers from wheat harvest). Corn machines have long bolts with the spacer (maybe 2 inches long) sitting on the upper side of the rail. Take the bolts out and put these spacers in between the rail and the separator grate, thus lowering the grates down a little. This will give the kernel more opportunity to get through the grates. The spacers are typically only on the left side of the combine. But this does not prohibit one to install them on the right side, too.
If you don't find your spacers order them from your JD dealer.

Next thing would be to experiment wildly with rotor speed and maybe concave clearence. And I mean wildly, because with these days crazy varieties we have to think outsided the box. Try speeding up the rotor way above what you would think, one may even go into second gear. Or try to slow it way down, still threshing the corn of the cob by maybe closing the concave and see what happens.
 

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This is very common to rotor combines. I have posted about rotor loss already years ago.
Mark Underwood, the inventor of the bi-rotor combine (www.ralfmeister.com/birotor.htm) calls this the "rifle effect".
Instead of falling through the separator grates the corn kernel joins in the spin of the rotor and gets literally screwed out of the back. There is no straight solution to this, because the effect depends on the shape of the kernel, the moisture and the temperature. With the wide varieties of corn these days, the conditions will vary greatly for everyone.

First of all, put the corn spacers in. Combines which are spect from the factory as "corn machines" have those along but not installed. If you stand at the left side of the combine and have the rear plastic covers removed, look at the separator grates, where they are bolted to the top rail. (Don't forget to remove the separator grate covers from wheat harvest). Corn machines have long bolts with the spacer (maybe 2 inches long) sitting on the upper side of the rail. Take the bolts out and put these spacers in between the rail and the separator grate, thus lowering the grates down a little. This will give the kernel more opportunity to get through the grates. The spacers are typically only on the left side of the combine. But this does not prohibit one to install them on the right side, too.
If you don't find your spacers order them from your JD dealer.

Next thing would be to experiment wildly with rotor speed and maybe concave clearence. And I mean wildly, because with these days crazy varieties we have to think outsided the box. Try speeding up the rotor way above what you would think, one may even go into second gear. Or try to slow it way down, still threshing the corn of the cob by maybe closing the concave and see what happens.

One highly effective way to control the "rifling effect" is with a system (combine) whose threshing and separating systems are controlled separately, whereby the settings for effective threshing do not compromise the rate and quality of separation at nearly the same level as on a single rotor system that has to rely on a common rotor speed for both threshing and separation, by default. We must remember that speeds used for threshing are not necessarily good for separating and vise versa. I learned this with my first lexion 485R with its threshing variator (175 - 1150 rpm) and separating variator (390 rpm - 1050 rpm). Having the two of them give the operator total and easy control over performance and loss.
 

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We had that problem last year. We have two 05 9760's and they both did it. This is what our combines would be doing, you would be going along and every thing would be just fine full power everything, just like that it would come to a dead stop barely running it would not recover until you shut the head and machine off and then it would regain power again and it would be good for 2-5 min and then again. We checked the sediment bowl and it was full of junk cleaned it out and it was good to go and then in beans it was doing it to both of the machines and then we had to change the fuel filters. But last year we had a bunch of crudy fuel because of the short and they we running the lines and the tanks dry and has soon as they were done filling them they would pump fuel out and would not give it time to settle and so we had all this junk in the fuel but it only did this on the combines the tractors were fine and everyting else.
 
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