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We have always used one tandem to haul grain away from two combines. With the larger hopper size and capacity of our new Lexions we are recognizing the need to upgrade our truck. We grow wheat and canola - no barley or corn so my expectation is that we will be able to keep up to the two combines with one tri drive truck. Almost all our fields have storage within 1 mile of the field. I like the idea of a tri drive as opposed to a grain cart because we could get by with less operators and the truck would be useful as a second truck to deliver grain on occasion. (much of our grain is stored within a few miles of the delivery point) We are prepared to purchase a new truck but at the same time realize that for the amount it will be used a good used one would be adequate if it could be found. I am interested in hearing peoples thoughts on what to look for and where to look to find a suitable tri drive truck.
 

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Interesting question

I'd like to as well as what advantages a tri drive would have over a tandem? I think in some US areas they call them twin screws.
That would make a tri drive a triple screw. Kinky.

How much bigger box?

Anyone who has used both on short hauls is the klutziness of a tri drive over a tandem negate any advantage?
 

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why not get a second older tandem? They sell at auction with new boxes for 30-50k.But I dont see how you can keep up to 2 big bines with one truck so if you are not carting now get a cart and use it as a surge bin sitting on the field and try hauling with one truck.
 

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The neighbour had a tri-drive with a 24' x 60" box on it. I think it held 800 bushels. He rented all his land out and sold all his equipment with the deal. They were driving the truck with water/organic "water" and tried to take a corner too fast. Unfortunately they tipped it over and twisted it all up. I would have loved to have bought that truck.

The only thing the neighbor told me is that you had to be carefully when cornering with that truck, apparently the new owner didn't heed his warning! Somehow a tri-drive corners harder than a traditional tandem and tends to "push" you more when turning.
 

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wow you use 1 truck to keep the grain away from 2 combines and they never stop, we use 3 end dumps and a grain cart for 2 combines, you must have super fast unloading system? we like 30 ft end dumps because they are quick to dump they hold around 1000 bushels
 

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I hauled away from two 9600's with one tandem for ten years. Worked fantastic. But There was no room for trouble with just one truck, you would run to the field pick up both combines then straight back to the yard.
Eventually we put a grain cart in the field as a surge bin for when we we're more than five miles from the yard but with only three people it was very efficient. A few muddy harvests make a grain cart indespensible though.
 

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Going to need a large end gate hole to dump quickly. I would think you might need a larger auger.

Lots of the new trucks can't run in the field. Chaff keeps plugging the rad. Make that the first thing you check.

What 2 combines are you keeping up to now and what types of yields? Lexions have dinky little hoppers for their capacity, doesn't give you much time to get back. Think you need a 900 bushel box. Lower yielding crops will also give you more time.

I found a semi and 1/2 a super b worked excellent. Parked my tandems after using the trailer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Going to need a large end gate hole to dump quickly. I would think you might need a larger auger.

Lots of the new trucks can't run in the field. Chaff keeps plugging the rad. Make that the first thing you check.

What 2 combines are you keeping up to now and what types of yields? Lexions have dinky little hoppers for their capacity, doesn't give you much time to get back. Think you need a 900 bushel box. Lower yielding crops will also give you more time.

I found a semi and 1/2 a super b worked excellent. Parked my tandems after using the trailer.
With two New Holland 8080's we have all sorts of time with one truck. The truck driver is quick; he is responsible for filling the bins and moving the auger without help. I doubt the combines wait more than 10 minutes total per season. Like I mentioned previously there is seldom a time when the grain needs to be trucked more than 1 mile from field to bin. In the good years the wheat will yield around 90 and canola 60 - 65 bu/ac. Yes a large box will be a necessity and I am concerned that with the relatively small hopper size of the Lexions, one truck might not keep up anymore. We might have to keep our current tandem and hire a second driver for the wheat acres.
 

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My farm has a tri drive truck, in manitoba it has to have 3 drive axles & no lift or tag axles. The legal weights of a tri vs tandem truck are pretty small, probably won't even be worth it. But in overall capacity our tri is quite impressive, 24ft box 66" sides and it will hold almost 900bus of wheat. You really need the wider front tires if your going to travel in the field with it. I'm impressed you can keep up to two big combines with just one truck, but I won't argue with it cause it works for you. I know it wouldn't work on my farm, too far way from the bins. We also have a 32ft end dump trailer with 60" sides holds around 1100bus and a 37ft tri end dump with 66" sides that holds 1400bus.
 

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Don' think you need bigger tandem , since hopper's on combine are smaller.
I assume you take a dump of each combine and race to yard if you take more grain it takes longer to return to field and combine's are waiting.
A faster auger and faster s travel speed will win capacity .
Bigger truck will ad none of the above.
 

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Tridrive

We never stop when dumping directly on a truck. I would go with a 24' x 8.5' x 72" box to easily accommodate dumping both combines on the go.
When the second Lexion showed up the 2 tandems could not handle the grain. We were always stopping to unload the second combine and having to stop unloading before empty and with the auger full. Not good. Bought a 2006 IH 5900 tri with ISX 565, 18 spd, full locking diffs and 20,000 lb front axel with 385s. The box is 24 x 8 1/2 x 72" with a 35 ton telescoping hoist
and roll tarp. It gets around the field very well and hauls 8-900 bu easily, about 650-700 bu wheat legally. It will haul 1000 bu but starts to not want to go where you steer getting out of little approaches. You learn to load heavy on the front so it steers better. One driver with a class 3 can keep up hauling up to 3-4 miles and dumping into the pit in the yard. A 2 minute turnaround by opening the door in the back. It is good to have the trailer in the field for emergency unloads. My truck is for sale and has 390 k and 10,000 hrs. It is a very good rig. 2014 was my last rodeo after nearly 50 years!:)
 

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We run 2 760s. Use a 1000 bushel cart and 2 tandems. If the crop is yielding like last 2 years have usually second truck is full, running and waiting before trucker gets back to field. If he has one issue everything backs up quickly. Our furthest haul is 4 miles. Every bodies situation is different but we wouldn't be without our cart. Have had a cart for close to 20 years now.
 

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If the combines are doing 1500 bus/hr the 350 bushel hopper fills up in 14 minutes. Should it take 3 minutes to dump the second combine, you now have 11 minutes to go dump and get back to the first combine.

I don't think that is possible all the time. Combines are often full at the far end of the field.

A second tandem and dumping before the combines are full would probably be the cheapest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
If the combines are doing 1500 bus/hr the 350 bushel hopper fills up in 14 minutes. Should it take 3 minutes to dump the second combine, you now have 11 minutes to go dump and get back to the first combine.

I don't think that is possible all the time. Combines are often full at the far end of the field.

A second tandem and dumping before the combines are full would probably be the cheapest.
When we demo'ed the Lexion it was only capable of about 900 bu/hr in canola. (we were straight cutting and the crop was flat on the ground so much more straw than normal) Based on its canola performance I was expecting it would do about 1100 bu/hr in wheat, so 20 minutes per hopper. Anyway, we should have ample time to get back with one truck in all the canola acres and most of the wheat acres where the bin is right in the field. If that is true, it will only be a couple days a year that the combine operators will either need to exercise some patience or, we might be able to find a second truck driver for those odd days.
 

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The other problem with the Lexion is the unload speed is not the fastest on the market. With a high capacity combine you will travel a fair ways down the field when unloading on the go. When you have invested all that money to gain capcity on your combine you will not want to give it up in high yielding crops with the lack of capacity in the trucking department. I do not see how one driver can empty two Lexion combines with one truck on the go without the machines stoping and waiting during the day in a higher yielding crop. One thing is for sure is I would not want to be the driver of the one truck. That would be a stressful position. When you unload on the go your dumps can be closer to 400 bushels per combine if they are right full. You should in cereals be able to do 1400-1500 bushel per hour in a good crop with good cutting conditions.
 

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The other problem with the Lexion is the unload speed is not the fastest on the market. With a high capacity combine you will travel a fair ways down the field when unloading on the go. When you have invested all that money to gain capcity on your combine you will not want to give it up in high yielding crops with the lack of capacity in the trucking department. I do not see how one driver can empty two Lexion combines with one truck on the go without the machines stoping and waiting during the day in a higher yielding crop. One thing is for sure is I would not want to be the driver of the one truck. That would be a stressful position. When you unload on the go your dumps can be closer to 400 bushels per combine if they are right full. You should in cereals be able to do 1400-1500 bushel per hour in a good crop with good cutting conditions.
I agree with this. 3000 bushels per hour is 12 to 15 min per trip if everything is going right. If you move the auger or have a bit of an issue, then your combines are sitting. 2 big combines waiting in the field for one truck. Thats something I would not want.

I would look at a grain cart first then have more truck power if it was me.
 
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