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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yes.

The easiest flights on the market to install. Easier if the feeder is removed, but you do-not have to remove the rotor or the front bearing. A helping hand is allways nice and safer as you'll be working around places that are all too easy to pinch a finger.

Yes.
 

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Our neighbor has 3- 1460's and after installing one set, refitted the other 2 units with them as well. He swears by them. When the straw is getting a bit tough in the evening, there is no more banging and pounding like the old elepant ears used to produce. He claims he can combine a lot later in the evening now.
 

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I have a set in a 1688 and a friend installed on his 1666 at the same time. Not too bad to install, as Doorknob said, easier with helping hand. Did not remove feeder house, but probably will next time. Amazing the difference it made feeding the rotor.
 

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I have used 2 sets of kile rotor flights and they work very well. Also get the transition plates to put on while you are doing it. Big improvement there. Go ahead and take the feeder housing off. Much easier.
 

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Specifications for harvesting wheat, sunflower and canola. If you can tell me all the specification I would appriciate it.
Wait. Are you talking about finding out what kind of kyle rotor flighting to buy or are you talking about combine settings? If it's settings, please start a brand new topic instead of replying to this discussion from 2009.
 

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Yes.

The easiest flights on the market to install. Easier if the feeder is removed, but you do-not have to remove the rotor or the front bearing. A helping hand is allways nice and safer as you'll be working around places that are all too easy to pinch a finger.

Yes.
How hard is it to put the flights on a specialty rotor without pulling the feederhouse? Would it be quicker in the long run to pull the feederhouse? I usually work by myself but can occasionally get my wife to help.
 

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Can it be done yes, as doorknob mentioned, they are ackward to handle, finger pinching sob, without removing feeder house your laying on your belly, plus you have the fun of removing bolts.Do yourself a favor, pull feeder house, not that hard of a job, forklift works best with side shift, a heavy skid steer with pallet forks will work, than your looking at it, keep in mind, you might need to have rotor in neutral, when you remove that amount of weight, rotor will turn NOW, normally I just get them lined up so I can get at bolts, torch might be required with rotor locked in gear, two people is much hander when removing, installing, Scott.
 

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I guess I did all three of my machines through the inspection cover, 2-1/2 hours to install, I really felt the biggest pain was the transition bars because I had to remove concaves, for what ever reason on all mine I had to grind the edge of the wear plates off other wise they would rub against my bearing housing. I guess if you could find someone in their mid 20's that would be best and pay close attention that you mount them 180 across from each other, some how I messed that up once and didn't notice till I was nearly done
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
How hard is it to put the flights on a specialty rotor without pulling the feederhouse? Would it be quicker in the long run to pull the feederhouse? I usually work by myself but can occasionally get my wife to help.
It can be done. I have done it. But by yourself, it would be a great advantage to pull the feeder. Your wife can help with that, but I would never put her in a potential danger of loosing a finger installing the flights thru the top cover.

Here's one of my picture threads on agtalk that may or may not help you with the feeder. I was removing the rotor in that thread, so you may not have to go quite as far when getting the feeder out of the way.
 

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I would pull the feeders house I if installing again, I'm eight years older now, maybe a little wiser, but definitely no stronger then when I installed a set. Did them though the top cover.
 

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It can be done. I have done it. But by yourself, it would be a great advantage to pull the feeder. Your wife can help with that, but I would never put her in a potential danger of loosing a finger installing the flights thru the top cover.

Here's one of my picture threads on agtalk that may or may not help you with the feeder. I was removing the rotor in that thread, so you may not have to go quite as far when getting the feeder out of the way.
Taking the feeder off doesn't look to bad. How about attaching the header, then removing the header along with the feederhouse? I could just set the header on the ground, diconect lift cylinders, belts, and so forth, then back up. It should be easy to reattach as well, maybe?

Are those Kile rasp bars on your rotor? I like your return design, I'm certain its much better in small, fine seed crops.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yes, there are several different Kile bars on that rotor. Some experimentals.

Way back in the old days when I ran dad's 503 and those year models, that is how we changed concaves. The header stayed on the feeder and a bracket for a bottle jack was bolted to the under side of the feeder for support and we backed the combine away. It worked then. It probably should work now, but I have not done it, nor have I been present to see it done in a new model. I have heard others talk about it though.

Biggest reason I dont like removing the feeder all the way unless needed, is on the older machines with the reel pump on the feeder, it takes quite a few more bolts and time to remove the reel pump and tie it up on the steps. That's not real bad by yourself, but re-installing the lift cylinders is a real pita.

I built that tailings system way back in I think 1998 or so. It works in all crops here. But hard thresh spring wheat and clovers was the driving notion to do it. When you take seed crops to the cleaner,, you are charged on the in weight. If you have unthreshed seeds in your truck, you not only loose that yield, but then have to pay to have them removed.
 
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