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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So pretty sure my compressor went today, didn't run it for half of last reason as the belt twisted on me and it was kind of cold doing corn anyway. Replaced the belt this year and first time using it today the compressor lasted about 2 hours and started smoking pretty good, and for some reason caused my fan fuse in the cab to blow. Removed the belt and finished the grain today but it's like sitting in a fish bowl out in the sun. Have a basic knowledge of lots of things but none on ac systems. Are compressors hard to change? Or should I have someone who knows what they're doing look at it? Thanks
 

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The compressor is not hard to change, did it quite a few times on my M2, but (always a but) you need to be able to capture the refrigerant and recharge the system. My BIL has the pumps and stuff to do that so he takes care of that for me. You can do that yourself, but your going to need the proper tools to do that. Best of luck!
 

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If you are harvesting and need it, now is not the time to learn A/C systems. Find someone to help you with it. Then try to find an a/c class to learn it. It is a nice knowledge to have with all the equipment farmers use these days.
 

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young.farmer90, get someone who is savy on the replace/charge. Unfortunately there are several different clutches and the height of the hose connections on the head differs. Plus an overcharge can ruin the compressor shaft or the clutch and shred the drive belt:mad:. Be time and money ahead to get that experienced help the first time out.
Good luck,
Dwight E. Lambert Albany, Oregon
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Blew slightly cool air for a little while until whatever happened happened, then it was all just smoke. Tried spinning the pulley by hand this morning and it is only free on about 1/4 the way around the shaft. Fortunately the guy who can get replacements is also savy about installing and recharging them, so I think I'll just let him handle that part. Anyone know the make or model of these compressors? Can't seem to find any numbers on mine. Thanks!
 

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Yorks were I believe the most common on farm equipment. Tecuseh also made them. Basically I believe identical but made mostly from aluminum. I think the front pulley/clutch is the same for both and can be obtained rebuilt as can the compressor. Front seal next to clutch is a common leak area and sometimes will build up dirt between the clutch and the compressor housing to cause the belt to slip or break and for a time only run part time with belt slipping on the engaged clutch hub. The clutch is usually easily removed by impact wrench with bolt threaded in the center of the clutch. Usually only able to get a bolt threaded in about 2 turns by hand wrench but the impact will push the compressor easily off the shaft. Don't attempt a vice and hand wrendh it usually won't work and the impact is a snap to remove. Look very carefully at the clearance between the clutch/pulley assembly and the compressor housing they often 'freeze' up there with dirt and shaft leaked oil. The seal is usually an easy replace and as I recall the York and Tecumseh use the same seal. Again if you replace the pump be sure to measure the 2 nipples on top of the head for exact height as the same compressor fits many different engines and frequently Ford, Chrysler etc may use a different nipple height with their own style short or deep female hose nut. A whole bunch of different clutch and pulley combinations and diameter so measure all exactly to get the right fit first time out. I think the last of those type pumps was manufactured around late 80's but there are still quite a few remans available. Slight difference in head bolt pattern so don't think because they look alike that the old head can be installed to solve the wrong hose fitting nipple problem. Probably less than a 50/50 chance of head interchange so get the correct one to start with. Don't forget to add R-12 lube oil before the recharge if the system is drained or in doubt. Pump won't last long without the oil. All comes down to having some experienced help for the learning curve.
Good luck,
Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon (more 90-100f days here with cool down forecast by weekend here on the bad end of starvation flats):)
 

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The compressor on my R70 locked up this past wheat season, it and my Deutz R62 both have those York compressors. I took it off ( PLUG OFF THE LINES TO KEEP MOISTURE OUT ) and took it to O'Reilly's, they had to search through a book in order to find the correct compressor and clutch, they got it for me next day and the combo only cost me like $280 or so
 

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Had seals leak on the York compressor on my M several times through the years, a reman didn't cure that problem. The best thing to come along is the Sanden compressor kit change. The recommendation is to start them every few weeks so the seal remains lubricated and pliable.
 
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