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There are already laws like that if you are involved in certain programs. For eg, if you are selling grain to a company that moves grain into Europe, you need to sign onto an ISCC agreement, where they will not allow you to de tree your farmland beyond a reasonable amount. Stripping down a 1/4 would be far beyond a reasonable amount.
So the UK can import wood chips to fuel their wood burning electrical plant??
Who would have thought scrub bush would have value?
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Thank you to everyone for the comments/answers/discussion.

I went and eyeballed the situation up. This is not going to be cropland..... ever..... I checked the soil type before leaving and was rather suspicious. Got there and became more than suspicious. Possibly it might be worthwhile to put a fence around it. As far as clearing and cropping it is not something that anyone could ever do with an expectation of profits anytime in the next few generations. The family walking away from it generations ago became much easier to understand upon seeing it. Speaking to a neighbour who described it as "having difficulty growing grass" confirmed the earlier suspicions.

Again thank you to everyone.
 

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Our RM requires a permit here if you plan on clearing land. I don't know how many desks that goes through before it gets the rubber stamp.
It might be more of a way to make sure that any possible buried utilities are identified and located before people just start going at it.
“Oh there’s nothing out there just dig”. Are usually the famous last words
 

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Makes sense especially if land has changed hands. Common sense would say these utility and pipeline rightaways would still have a footprint through the bush and you’d steer clear when burying things but never say never. Remember years ago my dad was doing some cat work in the hills and my cousin who flew the pipelines on a weekly basis told him to be careful on a particular spot because the condensate pipeline there could be damaged cause it wasn’t that deep. Few years later same oil company was putting in a lease road across said rightaway which dad even told the consultant the line wasn’t in that deep. Lo and behold they hit it with a ripper tooth. Kind of ironic.
 

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It might be more of a way to make sure that any possible buried utilities are identified and located before people just start going at it.
“Oh there’s nothing out there just dig”. Are usually the famous last words
That's a good point.
I also think it may be for land assessment changes.
Also, changes in water flow, erosion, etc.
I just wonder if council can deny permission even without a good reason.
 

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Makes sense especially if land has changed hands. Common sense would say these utility and pipeline rightaways would still have a footprint through the bush and you’d steer clear when burying things but never say never. Remember years ago my dad was doing some cat work in the hills and my cousin who flew the pipelines on a weekly basis told him to be careful on a particular spot because the condensate pipeline there could be damaged cause it wasn’t that deep. Few years later same oil company was putting in a lease road across said rightaway which dad even told the consultant the line wasn’t in that deep. Lo and behold they hit it with a ripper tooth. Kind of ironic.
It depends on the area, how much you can see after a line goes through, native prairie you can see a ROW for years after, farm land a year or two, unless it’s stripped again and then you can usually see the old ditch line. and if it is in short fast growing brush it can pretty much disappear. If it’s cut through standing trees it’s easy to spot. Ground disturbance is a course that any farmer who has their own hoe, loader or cat should have. It can be a real eye opener.
Condensate isn’t something I would want to hit, it has an extremely low flash point. did anyone die or get hurt from that?
 

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It depends on the area, how much you can see after a line goes through, native prairie you can see a ROW for years after, farm land a year or two, unless it’s stripped again and then you can usually see the old ditch line. and if it is in short fast growing brush it can pretty much disappear. If it’s cut through standing trees it’s easy to spot. Ground disturbance is a course that any farmer who has their own hoe, loader or cat should have. It can be a real eye opener.
Condensate isn’t something I would want to hit, it has an extremely low flash point. did anyone die or get hurt from that?
What actually happened is crazier than you could imagine. It was apparent where the line was. The line was only 4’ deep. When it was breached the stuff shot 18’ in the air and the cat skinner proceeded to berm it thinking it was a salt water line. No one blew up or anything but it was big bucks at the time to fix and clean up. Just amazing an engine didn’t run away let alone an explosion happen.
 

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What actually happened is crazier than you could imagine. It was apparent where the line was. The line was only 4’ deep. When it was breached the stuff shot 18’ in the air and the cat skinner proceeded to berm it thinking it was a salt water line. No one blew up or anything but it was big bucks at the time to fix and clean up. Just amazing an engine didn’t run away let alone an explosion happen.
That guy must be one of the luckiest fellas spinning on this ball.
I worked with a guy years ago, his Father in law hauled condensate, he forgot to kick the fan in on his truck before unloading, when it kicked in there was enough mixture in the air that it exploded, burnt the truck to the ground, he lived a few days, then passed away.
I also worked with another welder who was fixing a condensate line break, when he started welding, the condensate that had soaked into the ground started the ditch on fire, nobody was hurt but he said it was something to see
 

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That guy must be one of the luckiest fellas spinning on this ball.
I worked with a guy years ago, his Father in law hauled condensate, he forgot to kick the fan in on his truck before unloading, when it kicked in there was enough mixture in the air that it exploded, burnt the truck to the ground, he lived a few days, then passed away.
I also worked with another welder who was fixing a condensate line break, when he started welding, the condensate that had soaked into the ground started the ditch on fire, nobody was hurt but he said it was something to see
Maybe it was the same ditch. When this break was being repaired there were blue flames all over the place.
 

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Interesting timing of this conversation. I've been dealing with some pipeline crossing for drainage lately. The one fellow mentioned that his next stop is to go an deal with another farmer who had piled brush piles on top of a pipeline, and was starting to burn them. Which is not allowed on the right of way. I probably wouldn't have even thought about that.

Some of the massive trees around here leave a crater many feet deep when they tip over. And if they are stumps left from logging, need to be ripped very deep to come loose. So there is some merit to being informed about their location before brushing.
 

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Interesting timing of this conversation. I've been dealing with some pipeline crossing for drainage lately. The one fellow mentioned that his next stop is to go an deal with another farmer who had piled brush piles on top of a pipeline, and was starting to burn them. Which is not allowed on the right of way. I probably wouldn't have even thought about that.

Some of the massive trees around here leave a crater many feet deep when they tip over. And if they are stumps left from logging, need to be ripped very deep to come loose. So there is some merit to being informed about their location before brushing.
I would love to see where it says you’re not allowed to pile brush on a right away. Not saying it’s a good idea or even you should do it but the smart energy companies work with farmers and landowners. Pretty sure it needs to be a surface lease before their opinion matters about surface issues.
 

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If agree with that. Because after the pile is burned, the next step is to dig a hole as deep as possible right beside the pile to burry the left over stumps and root balls.
Ok that’s a no-no lol
 

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I just bought 150 acres...70 open ..rest bush...that was logged almsot 20 years ago now...biggest poplars are around 6 inch. I have my own 8 and 6 as well as a older deere790 excavator. Im hoping the roots come right out when we knock them down so it makes it all that much easier to brush pile! If I didnt have my own equipment... i dont think I would have bought it.
 

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I just bought 150 acres...70 open ..rest bush...that was logged almsot 20 years ago now...biggest poplars are around 6 inch. I have my own 8 and 6 as well as a older deere790 excavator. Im hoping the roots come right out when we knock them down so it makes it all that much easier to brush pile! If I didnt have my own equipment... i dont think I would have bought it.
In my experience with trees that size a loader tractor with forks and grapple is a huge time and undercarriage saver.
Excavator digs them out, tractor piles them. That is if you are concerned about dirt in the pile.
 
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