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Discussion Starter #1
In the process of designing a farm workshop and I'm interested in being able to fit a semi with 40' hopper trailer inside for the winter. Currently just using tandem grain trucks but would like to build the shop with expansion in mind. Wondering if anyone knows the approximate length of a semi with sleeper and a 40' trailer?
 

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I would think 60 feet at the very least, would be tight to lift the hood.
 

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I agree with Kevlar, with 70' being better for you to work on. We used to back our 2 semis (40' trailers and trucks with sleepers) back to back in cold storage that was 144' long. And that was enough room to open both hoods at 72' each.
 

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MFinlay were you going to design it with a door on each end to drive the semi through or just one door to back it in? If a person makes a door on each end for the semi it makes it a little more difiicult to put a additional wide door in on the end for wide equiptment unless you use the wide door for getting in and out of. If anyone has only thoughts on how to arrange the doors I would appreciate it. I need to build a heated shop in the next few years as well and need something to get a semi in and out of as well as large wide equiptment.
 

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My 45 foot trailer on a truck with a sleeper barely fits in my 70 foot building with enough room to open the hood and no room to walk around the unit. Length of building required will depend on the length of truck but from my experience you will need at least a 70 ft building to have any room with a 40 ft trailer.
 

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I’ve been to a few places that have made a lean to off the side of there shop to park the semis. Door on either end. They made it just wide enough and long enough to put truck an trailer in. Any bigger any they figure it would just collect stuff. If the need to work on it they will pull it into the main shop. One guy had it separate forced air heat source and another had it heated from the floor heat in shop when he built it all with separate control. They put cement in them with a floor drain. Kept the main shop dryer and truck out of the way when working on other things.
 

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100’ if you ever have a Super B.

2 doors with removable post can work for what southernsk is talking about.

As nice as a drive through would be, backing in or out shouldn’t be a big deal. Probably really depends on how it fits in your yard.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the input. Was looking at doing a drive through only so that I wouldn't have to drop the trailer at the end of a day to pull the truck into a warm shop or alternatively leaving the truck outside and plugged in.
 

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Most trucks in Manitoba are going to b 244 wheelbase and most trailers will have a 22" kingpin setback so you can do the math fairly easily. That being said I have 78ft long and will fit a 45ft trailer/truck and open the hood and walk around. I would absolutely go longer if i had the choice but if your certain that 40ft will be the longest then a 75ft shop would do nicely.
 

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You have some good advice already on length. I would size for a tridem because if you're gonna pull a tandem you may as well pull a tridem.

However I am not a big fan of putting a truck and trailer in every night in winter, why waste energy warming up all that steel and opening doors? Put a good block and oilpan heater in it and park it in cold storage, it will start fine. You may want to size the shop for it to go into when necessary for repairs, but usually that's just the truck. I start my trucks out of cold storage and it works fine, try to park loaded to help with brake freezing issues and rarely have problems. Just some food for thought.
 

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I actually kind of agree with swman, now that we have cold storage that’s where our semis get parked at night. When we used to put them in shop, radiant heat, they would get half melted off but not dried off, would pull out and head to town and when you got there the gates would be froze shut! Happened a lot actually. This was when you parked after supper and left early in the morning. Floor heat probably would be different.
 

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Condensation from extreme temp differences and more become problems parking a truck in a heated shop. Unless the truck will be left in long enough to warm up completely you are way better off leaving it sit outside. Not just accumulating water in the fuel tanks resulting in frozen crossovers, but the air system as well creates avoidable issues. Auxiliary systems like winch controls for example can be very susceptible. Might seem silly to some to leave a truck out in the cold but it is the best place for it when you are running it regularly. Back in my rig moving days I had a truck shop in town, but unless I needed to do work on the truck, if I was passing thru and got to stop at home for a day or two, I still just took the truck home to the farm and left it outside.
 
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